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Post Your British Roman Hoard Coins!


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For me, provenance is often the most important feature of a coin. It’s how the coin connects us to our past. Hoards in particular have a provenance that goes all the way back to the original owners. The context of the find can be as interesting as the coin and tells us about the people that actually used them.

Many hoards have been found in Britain. Indeed, a disproportionate number. Much of the reason for this is because recording them is encouraged through the Portable Antiquities Scheme. But that can't be the full explanation as to why 80% of all silver coin hoards across the Roman Empire from 388-410 were found in southeast England. Some of the biggest 3rd and 4th century hoards are British too - the Frome (Somerset) Hoard 2010, from the early 4th century, contained 52,503. It seems the British had both the coins to bury, and the reasons to bury them. Whatever they might be.

How many British hoards can we represent in this thread? There are over 1,200 hoards dating from AD43 to 410, but many are small or end up in museums, so we won't get anywhere near that number. If you have details of the hoard and of the original sale, or even a link to the coin on the Portable Antiquities Scheme page, all the better.

Hoards (27) represented in this thread (links are to descriptions and Portable Antiquities Scheme references)

Quidenham (Norfolk) 2014 (NMS-480CEE) buried 61: L Cassi

Ropsley (Lincolnshire) 2018 (LANCUM-F93E5B), buried 150-2: Hadrian (below)

Westbury Sub Mendip (Somerset) 2016 (SOM-F1847A) buried 193: Galba, Vitellius

Dereham, near (Norfolk) 2004-2010 (IARCH-2EC76C), 2008 (NMS-F33213), 2010-2016 (NMS-7FB747), buried 245: Severus Alexander

Elveden (Suffolk) 1953 (IARCH-809F6C) buried 248: Julia Maesa

Dorchester (Dorset) 1936 (IARCH-5E5FEF) buried 257: Philip I x5, Philip IOtacilia SeveraGordian III

Beachy Head (Sussex) 1878 (IARCH-AB492F), 1899 (IARCH-64CD1F), 1961 (IARCH-6C5529), 1964 (IARCH-666105), 1973 (IARCH-162415), buried 266-282: Balbinus, Pupienus (both 1964)

Oliver's Orchard I (IARCH-C36656), Oliver's Orchard II (IARCH-4184BA), Oliver's Orchard III (IARCH-3E85E8) (Essex) 1983, buried 269 and 274: Tetricus I (II or III)

Wareham I (IARCH-3DB3D1) and Wareham II (IARCH-2FBE67) (Dorset) 1994-5, buried 271 and 282: Philip I x3 (Wareham I)

Botley (Hampshire) 1994 (IARCH-569EED), buried 274: Valerian I

Braithwell (Yorkshire) 2002-4 (IARCH-BDFCCB), buried 282: Tetricus I

Normanby (Lincolnshire) 1985 (IARCH-1A9E14), buried 293: Gallienus, Tetricus I x8, Tetricus II

Linchmere (Sussex) 1924 (IARCH-BB896B), buried 293: Probus

Langtoft I (IARCH-1DA746), Langtoft II (IARCH-D515B1) (Yorkshire) 2000, buried 306 and 324: Probus x4, Constantius I (all Langtoft I)

Rauceby (Lincolnshire) 2017 (LIN-F6D516), buried 307: Maximinus IISeverus II

Falmouth (Cornwall) 1865 (IARCH-4296C5), buried 310: Constantius I

Bourton-on-the-Water (Gloucestershire) 1970-1987 (IARCH-C3BF3A), buried 319: Constantine I

Martock (Somerset) 2012 (IARCH-7B35B7), buried 328: Constantine I

Chapmanslade (Wiltshire) 1993 (IARCH-2DEC05), buried 337: Barbarous Constantinian

Nether Compton (Dorset) 1989 (IARCH-6A057D), buried 341: VRBS ROMA, Barbarous VRBS ROMA

Bridgnorth (Shropshire) 2007 (IARCH-65B7BF), buried 355: Constantius II, Constantius IIConstans, Constans, Magnentius x3Decentius

Freckenham (Suffolk) Hoard 1948 (IARCH-C9D277), buried 361: Constantius Gallus

West Norfolk/Grimston 2015 (NMS-102704), 2017 (NMS-1A6962)Jul 2018 (NMS-488B7B)Oct 2018 (NMS-963FF1), 2020 (NMS-669388), buried 367: Julian II Contemporary Imitation (Oct 2018), Jovian (2020)

East Harptree (Somerset) 1887 (IARCH-4096EB), buried 378: Constantius II x2, Constantius IIJulian II, Julian II, Valentinian IValens, Valens

Vale of Pewsey (Wiltshire) 2020 (BM-7D34D9), buried 402: Julian IITheodosius IEugeniusMagnus Maximus

Thruxton (Hampshire) 2014 (GLO-9D7F36), 2015 (GLO-794BD4)2016 (IARCH-D0FEDF)2019 (GLO-BF8303), 2020 (IARCH-D0FEDF), buried 402: Valens, Arcadius

Otterbourne (Hampshire) Hoard 1978 (IARCH-1D7C98), buried 402: Gratian


I will start with a lesser known one, recently sold by Silbury Coins.

Hadrian Denarius, 126-127, from the Ropsley (Lincolnshire) Hoard 2018image.png.18ac2e3bbdd59cbc9f15152f61db1f6b.pngRome. Silver, 17x18mm, 3.40g. Head of Hadrian, laureate, right, slight drapery on left shoulder; HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS. Virtus standing right, resting foot on helmet, holding spear and parazonium; COS III (RIC III, 851).The Ropsley Hoard comprised a pot containing 522 denarii, from Mark Antony (32BC) to Faustina II (AD152), but many were of Hadrian (AD117-138). It was found in Lincolnshire by a metal detectorist, not far from the Roman town of Ancaster and Ermine Street, the Roman road connecting London to Lindum Colonia (Lincoln) and Eboracum (York).

Edited by John Conduitt
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Posted (edited)

A beautiful coin, and an interesting idea for a thread.

I have three known British Roman hoard coins:

Valens, AR reduced Siliqua, 364-367 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. DN VALEN-S PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / Rev. VOT- V- MV•LT - X in four lines within wreath. In exergue: Mintmark RB. RIC IX Rome 10c (p. 118), RSC V 91(h) (ill.), Sear RCV V 19687. 17 mm., 2.00 g.  From 1887 East Harptree hoard (one of 19 coins of this type in hoard; see https://archive.org/details/thirdnumismatic08royauoft/page/46/mode/1up). Ex Spink Auction 16006, 26-27 Sep 2016, Part of Lot 3028. (See https://www.numisbids.com/n.php?p=lot&sid=1689&lot=3028.)*

Siliqua - Valens - jpg version.jpg

* "The East Harptree hoard was discovered in 1887 on the land of Mr. W. Kettlewell of Harptree Court, while a search for a new spring was being conducted. Mr. Kettlewell kindly made them available for study at the British Museum, and they were written up by John Evans for the Numismatic Chronicle of 1888, pages 22-46. The British Museum was given a few of the most interesting coins, and the rest were returned to the owner. Many years later they were given to the father of the consignor by Mr. Kettlewell's son, and they have remained in their packing ever since. Evans noted \The coins when found were to some extent coated in dirt, and with what was probably a little chloride of silver. When carefully washed and brushed their remarkably good preservation became apparent, and there were none but what could be attributed to the emperor under whom they were struck\\. The coins offered here are as they were when returned from the BM in 1887/1888. Many exhibit light deposit, which could be easily removed by a competent conservator, but at the expense of the mint bloom that is apparent on many. The overall quality is remarkable, and few, if any, are clipped. Large numbers look ordinary to the naked eye, but when tilted towards the light, or examined under magnification, reveal extraordinary quality." (See https://www.numisbids.com/n.php?p=lot&sid=1689&lot=2858.)

For anyone interested, there are always quite a few East Harptree hoard coins for sale in the "after-market," presumably purchased at the 2016 Spink sale. Although I sometimes do wonder if any of those dealers are able to provide proof that their coins really do come from that hoard. I happen to be fortunate that my coin is clearly visible in one of the lot photos from that sale. Many claimed East Harptree hoard coins are not. 

Next, here are my two "Vale of Pewsey" hoard coins, purchased at the Noonans auction of that hoard last month. The two footnotes below apply equally to both of them.

1. Julian II (nephew of Constantine I), AR reduced Siliqua*, AD 362-363, Antioch Mint. Obv. Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, bearded, FL CL IVLIA-NVS PF AVG / Rev. VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; in exergue, ANT [Antioch]. 2.17 g., 19.33 x 18.40 mm., 6 h. RIC VIII 213 (p. 531), RSC V 147a, Sear RCV V 19128 (p. 279), Ghey 22 (this coin) [Ghey, E., “Vale of Pewsey, Wiltshire,” unpublished catalogue held by British Museum]. Purchased 17 May 2022 from Noonans (f/k/a Dix Noonan Webb) Auction, “The Vale of Pewsey Hoard of Late Roman Silver Coins,” Lot 11; ex Vale of Pewsey Hoard, discovered in Wiltshire 12-13 Sep. 2020, Portable Antiquities Scheme Hoard ID BM-7D34D9 (see https://finds.org.uk/database/hoards/record/id/3305).**

image.thumb.jpeg.3a5237446043bcda79f52301d6461120.jpeg

2. Magnus Maximus [Emperor in West AD 383-388 by usurpation from Gratian], AR reduced Siliqua*, AD 383-388, Trier Mint. Obv. Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, DN MAG MAX-IMVS PF AVG [AV ligatured] / Rev. Helmeted Roma seated facing on throne, head left, holding globe in right hand and reversed spear in left hand, VIRTVS RO-MANORVM; in exergue, TR PS [TR = Trier Mint; PS = Pvsvlatvm (struck from refined, purified silver; see Sear RCV V, Introduction p. 7)]. 1.90 g., 16.32 x 16.08 mm., 12 h. RIC IX 84(b)(1) (p. 29), RSC V 20b (ill. p. 176), Sear RCV V 20644 (p. 422); Ghey 56f (this coin) [Ghey, E., “Vale of Pewsey, Wiltshire,” unpublished catalogue held by British Museum]. Purchased 17 May 2022 from Noonans (f/k/a Dix Noonan Webb) Auction, “The Vale of Pewsey Hoard of Late Roman Silver Coins,” Lot 82; ex Vale of Pewsey Hoard, discovered in Wiltshire 12-13 Sep. 2020, Portable Antiquities Scheme Hoard ID BM-7D34D9 (see https://finds.org.uk/database/hoards/record/id/3305).**image.png.73893f363a8f825de3f78566e8d5801c.png

*See Sear RCV V at p. 271: “in AD 357 the weight of the [siliqua] denomination was reduced by one-third to 2 scripula or 2.25 grams.”

**See Noonans Auction Catalogue, at https://www.noonans.co.uk/media/auction_catalogues/Coins 17 May 22.pdf, p. 3:

"Presented here for sale is a hoard of fourth and early fifth century Roman silver coins, recovered in September 2020 from farmland in the Vale of Pewsey, Wiltshire, by a team of three avid metal detectorists. Over the course of two days Rob Abbott, Dave Allen and Mick Rae discovered a total of 160 silver coins and coin fragments, which were subsequently submitted to the relevant authorities for processing according to the Treasure Act 1997 (PAS BM–7D34D9, BM 2020 T702).

No container has been recovered from the site and the coins’ dispersal over an area of around 30 metres across the field suggests that the original parcel was disrupted in recent times by agricultural activity. A few of the recovered coins were badly chipped, broken or fragmentary. Most of these breaks look fresh and it would seem that this unfortunate damage has resulted from regular ploughing of the field for agricultural purposes.

We should be enormously grateful, therefore, that the hoard was recovered when it was before more coins succumbed to a similar fate. Numismatists and historians alike should appreciate the diligent efforts of these three finders in rescuing the Vale of Pewsey Hoard and ensuring that this important group was properly recorded for future study.

Following assessment and appraisal the British Museum decided to acquire two Miliarensia from the group for the Nation’s collection. The remaining coins were disclaimed and returned to the original finders, who have now chosen to sell the hoard so that private scholars and numismatists may have the opportunity to acquire examples for their own collections. Only those pieces in fragmentary state have been retained by the finders, and all 142 complete, or near complete, coins are listed in this catalogue; eighteen Miliarensia and 124 Siliquae.

Amongst them are numerous rare and beautifully preserved specimens which will appeal to specialist Roman collectors and general numismatists alike."

The breakdown of the 142 lots is as follows (see id. p. 10):

CONSTANS (337–350) 1

CONSTANTIUS II (337–361) 2–7

JULIAN II (360–363) 8–11

VALENTINIAN I (364–375) 12–14

VALENS (364–378) 15–33

GRATIAN (367–383) 34–49

VALENTINIAN II (375–392) 50–59

THEODOSIUS I (379–395) 60–74

MAGNUS MAXIMUS (383–388) 75–92

FLAVIUS VICTOR (387–388) 93–95

ARCADIUS (383–408) 96–118

EUGENIUS (392–394) 119–133

HONORIUS (393–423) 134–142

See also https://finds.org.uk/database/hoards/record/id/3305, noting that “Most of the coins have been only lightly clipped to remove silver from the edges of the coins, unlike many hoards with a deposition date into the fifth century AD. There are also few obviously irregular coins in the group. The total weight in silver of the late Roman coins submitted is 328.76g, remarkably close to a Roman pound in silver.”

 

 

Edited by DonnaML
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Constantius II

BGN353 - Constantius II (A.D. 337-361), Pre-Magnentian Revolt, AE Centenionalis, 21mm, 5.14g., Arles mint, first officina, A.D. 348-350, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of the Emperor right, A behind head, rev., FEL TEMP REPARATIO, PARL in exergue, helmeted soldier spearing fallen horseman, A in field, (RIC 119/121-22; Bridgnorth Report #79), very fine. RIC Arles 118

Ex Bridgnorth Hoard, Shropshire, England, buried circa A.D. 355, discovered 2007.

"On October 10th, 2007 a metal detectorist discovered a large scattered hoard of late Roman coins that had been disturbed by deep plowing in a potato field near Bridgnorth, Shropshire. His subsequent actions are praised in the UK government 2007 Portable Antiquities and Treasure Annual Report, where local finds officer Peter Reavill states: “The finder is to be congratulated on the careful plotting and speedy reporting of this hoard as it enabled the excavation to take place and vital depositional information recorded. In turn, this minimised the impact to the landowner and his farming activity.” The majority of hoards that come to light are found outside of planned archaeological excavations, the original owner having selected a secluded spot to conceal his or her wealth away from human habitation, leading to loss of information on the archaeological context of the hoard. In this instance, swift action and close cooperation by the finder and the local Finds Liaison Officer led to an excavation of the findspot. The results of which showed that the hoard had been contained in a large pottery vessel (broken by the plow), most probably previously used as a cooking pot as evidenced by burns marks on the outer edges. The pot had been buried in a U-shaped gulley or ditch that formed part of an otherwise unknown late Roman site.

The hoard consisted of 2892 coins, ranging in date from a Reform Antoninianus of Probus to post Magnentian issues of Constantius II up to A.D. 355. The majority of the hoard was issues of Magnentius and Decentius (75%), followed by pre-Magnentian issues of Constantius II and Constans (18%) and closing with post Magnentian issues of Constantius II and Gallus (7%)."

ciibh1.jpg.72d1fcd21436486574566ac81decad6a.jpgaZD2ok4MT69x2Kt59oBBzF7md8mGHi.jpg.4e665f3d5e31788776688977ca0a0849.jpg

 

 Constans

Constans, AE23. DN CONSTA-NS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, emperor on galley left, holding Victory on globe and labarum, Victory seated to right at the helm. Mintmark: TRP.
Trier
RIC VIII 219

Ex Bridgnorth 2007

1884914477_cgftr1br(1).jpg.e1a0202f4486897b8e192708354a9f4a.jpg

 

 

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

I have three known British Roman hoard coins

Those are great coins. East Harptree is one of my favourite hoards - a great story and the coins often have a beautiful patina. And, of course, despite being found 150 years ago, they were sold recently so you can find your coin in the online sale.

27 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

I happen to be fortunate that my coin is clearly visible in one of the lot photos from that sale. Many claimed East Harptree hoard coins are not.

Yes I've become increasingly sceptical about coins claiming to be from hoards that don't have provenance back to the original sale. While many of them are probably genuine, a few incidents recently have made me think some finders are bulking up their 'hoards' with unassociated coins. The resellers don't always check too thoroughly or simply accept that all the coins came from the hoard. But it's not so difficult to find coins with full provenances (like yours) or on the Portable Antiquities Scheme website. Anything else should be described as 'purportedly from the hoard'.

Nice that you got a couple of coins from the Vale of Pewsey Hoard. I don't think too many Magnus Maximus coins are found in Britain, even though he came to power here. I also bought a couple of coins from the hoard, because you don't see hoards for sale with such an amazing range of emperors very often.

Edited by John Conduitt
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Randygeki said:

Ex Bridgnorth Hoard, Shropshire

This is an interesting hoard. There are few found in Shropshire, over on the Welsh borders. It was full of Magnentius and Decentius coins (they had a British father, incidentally), and buried around 355, not long after their revolt was put down. Many of the coins feature Christian Chi-Rho symbols and Magnentius is shown bare headed, which was his way of appealing to the Orthodox populace to turn them against Constantius II and his Arianism. The reprisals against Magnentius's supporters were severe, and included the confiscation of their property, so it's not surprising a hoard of his coins was buried. In any case, all his coins were demonetised and withdrawn from circulation soon after, and hardly appear at all in later hoards.

Decentius as Caesar Centenionalis, 350-353, reportedly from the Bridgnorth (Shropshire) Hoard 2007.image.png.cd42f1108610cfc71c65c259fecccd3c.pngLugdunum. Bronze, 23mm, 5.92g. Bareheaded and cuirassed bust right; D N DECENT(I-VS NOB CAES). Large Chi-Rho , flanked by A and ω, SALVS DD NN (AVG ET CAES); mintmark PSLG (RIC VIII, 157/159)

Also interesting is that a quarter were barbarous imitations - the imitators must have worked quickly to strike so many coins copying issues from 350-353 before they were buried around 355.

Edited by John Conduitt
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ex-Nether Compton Hoard

Roman Empire, City Commemorative, Urbs Roma, Follis, Siscia (RIC-240)

Obv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Roma facing left. Legend around - VRBS ROMA
Rev: Lupa Romana standing left, suckling twins Romulus and Remus; two stars above. Legend below - • ASIS •

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ex-Bridgnorth Hoard

Roman Imperial: Constans (337-350 CE) BI Centenionalis, Siscia (RIC-218c)

Obv: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped bust of Constans left, holding globe in left hand
Rev: FEL • TEMP • REPA-RATIO; Soldier holding spear pointing upwards and leading barbarian right from hut under tree; BSISRM in exergue

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Roman Imperial: Constantius II (337-361 CE) BIL Heavy Maiorina, Trier (RIC-214; RCV-18178)

Obv: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from front
Rev: FEL TEMP-REPARATIO; Emperor standing left on galley steered by Victory seated in stern, confronting phoenix on globe held in right hand and grasping labarum marked with chi-rho in left; TRS in exergue

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Roman Imperial: Magnentius (350-353 CE) AE2 Centenionalis, Trier (RIC VIII 269)

Obv: DN MAGNEN-TIVS PF AVG; Bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind head
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM; Emperor on horseback galloping right, shield on arm, wielding spear at a bare-headed enemy half-kneeling before the horse, broken spear and shield beneath the horse; TRS in exergue

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Roman Imperial: Magnentius (350-353 CE) Æ Centenionalis, Ambianum (RIC VIII-14; LRBC-10)

Obv: D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG; Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right; A behind
Rev: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE; Two Victories standing facing one another, holding round shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X in four lines; staurogram above; AMB in exergue

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Roman Imperial: Magnentius (350-353 CE) Æ Centenionalis, Lugdunum (RIC-112; Bastien-154; LRBC-211)

Obv: D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG; Rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Magnentius right
Rev: FELICITAS REIPVBLICE; Magnentius standing left in armor, holding Victory on globe and standard with banner inscribed with Christogram; RPLC in exergue

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Ex Harptree Hoard

Roman Imperial: Constantius II (337-361) AR Siliqua (RIC VIII 214; RSC V 259a)

Obv: DN CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: VICTORIA DD NN AVG; Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm, one wing visible; LVG in exergue

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Roman Imperial: Constantius II (337-361) AR Siliqua (RIC VIII 216; RSC V 342-3a)

Obv: DN CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: VOTIS / XXX / MVLTIS / XXXX in laurel wreath; LVG in exergue LVG

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Roman Imperial: Julian II (361-363) AR Siliqua, Arelate (RIC VIII 312; RSC V 148c)

Obv: DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: VOT / X / MVLT / XX in laurel wreath, circular medallion at top of wreath; TCONST in exergue
 

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17 minutes ago, quant.geek said:

This was an immense hoard. 22,670 mostly Constantinian bronzes, 21,000 of which were Gloria Exercitus from the 330s. There were no Two Victories, dating the hoard to around 339. Despite the finder’s best efforts, a lack of resources meant no analysis was undertaken before the hoard was sold. The hoard was bought by Lodge Antiquities.

It contained numerous barbarous coins alongside the official issues they imitated. Stylistic links between imitations from Nether Compton and similar hoards have shown that unlike 3rd century imitations, huge numbers were made in Britain. The closure of the London mint in 326 may have created a shortage the locals filled.

Barbarous Imitation of a Commemorative VRBS ROMA, 335-339, reportedly from the Nether Compton (Dorset) Hoard 1989image.png.06fb7ef8f938dc8dd19b736319ee5954.png

East Anglia imitating Lugdunum. Bronze, 14mm, 1.20g. Helmeted and mantled bust of Roma left; VRBS ROMA. She-wolf standing left, head right, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus; two stars above; •PLG (cf RIC VII, 242).

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This needs new pics - ex-Quidenham Hoard, sold by Chris Rudd a few years ago.

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Moneyer:                             L. Cassius Caecianus
Coin: Silver Denarius
CAEICIAN - Bust of Ceres left, draped; above, control mark (C.)
- Yoke of oxen left; above, control mark (Γ.)
Exergue: L. CASSI
Mint: Rome (102 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 3.54g / - / -
References:
  • RSC 4 (Cassia)
  • Sydenham 594
  • Crawford 321/1
Acquisition: Chris Rudd Online sale Quidenham Hoard List #6 8-Jun-2018
Notes: Sep 17, 18 - This coin is coin no. 6 in this P.A.S. report - https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/634521

The coin is no. 6 in the PAS report: https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/634521

ATB,

Aidan.

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7 minutes ago, akeady said:

This needs new pics - ex-Quidenham Hoard, sold by Chris Rudd a few years ago.

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Moneyer:                             L. Cassius Caecianus
Coin: Silver Denarius
CAEICIAN - Bust of Ceres left, draped; above, control mark (C.)
- Yoke of oxen left; above, control mark (Γ.)
Exergue: L. CASSI
Mint: Rome (102 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 3.54g / - / -
References:
  • RSC 4 (Cassia)
  • Sydenham 594
  • Crawford 321/1
Acquisition: Chris Rudd Online sale Quidenham Hoard List #6 8-Jun-2018
Notes: Sep 17, 18 - This coin is coin no. 6 in this P.A.S. report - https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/634521

The coin is no. 6 in the PAS report: https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/634521

ATB,

Aidan.

Excellent coin. Chris Rudd is a great dealer for Iron Age British coins, which made up a lot of this hoard.

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11 minutes ago, John Conduitt said:

Excellent coin. Chris Rudd is a great dealer for Iron Age British coins, which made up a lot of this hoard.

Yes - I subscribe to their lists and have bought a good few coins from them over the years, though Celtic coins aren't my main collecting interest.   I got one of my favourite RR denarii from one of their auctions too!

ATB,
Aidan.

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Posted (edited)

By pure coincidence, I've been keeping my eye out for a while for a Constantius II siliqua in nice condition that's verifiably from the East Harptree hoard. There always seem to be quite a few for sale on V-Coins, but I've never seen one that I felt compelled to buy. Until tonight, when this thread inspired me to take another look.  And lo and behold, I saw one from Lugdunum, recently added by a well-known U.S. dealer, that really spoke to me. It said "Buy Me"!  I was able (although it took a while) to find it pictured in one of the photos of the group lots in the 2016 Spink auction of East Harptree hoard siliquae, so I went ahead and bought it. The dealer has already confirmed the sale, and I've bought from him a number of times before without ever having a delivery issue, so I don't think I'll jinx anything (famous last words!) by posting it:

image.jpeg.f6e4cd3bf2cd27f3b7682e42afaec1ea.jpeg 

image.jpeg.137e7b6111a10fa1cdea0bfc5a0e9916.jpeg

The group lot in the Spink sale, with a dot under this coin:

image.jpeg.b618110c36c28dcba5edb785b10fd74e.jpeg

So that gives me a total of four Roman siliquae from British coin hoards, two each from the East Harptree and Vale of Pewsey hoards.

Edited by DonnaML
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Posted · Benefactor

Here are my mine from the Beachy Head Hoard. One of Balbinus and another of Pupienus both minted in Rome in 238 AD during the year of the six emperors. Both coins found in 1964 within the same coin hoard in Sussex England,

I would like to believe they were most likely minted in Rome at the same time, shipped to Britannia in the same chest, and buried along with over 3,000 others by one of the first ancient romans to receive them as change (purely speculation of course). 

04EA4165-BDAB-4E10-8520-EE4570F4F04E.jpeg.fa049610c1b13660bd9d1408bed94531.jpeg

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6 hours ago, DonnaML said:

By pure coincidence, I've been keeping my eye out for a while for a Constantius II siliqua in nice condition that's verifiably from the East Harptree hoard. There always seem to be quite a few for sale on V-Coins, but I've never seen one that I felt compelled to buy. Until tonight, when this thread inspired me to take another look.  And lo and behold, I saw one from Lugdunum, recently added by a well-known U.S. dealer, that really spoke to me. It said "Buy Me"!  I was able (although it took a while) to find it pictured in one of the photos of the group lots in the 2016 Spink auction of East Harptree hoard siliquae, so I went ahead and bought it. The dealer has already confirmed the sale, and I've bought from him a number of times before without ever having a delivery issue, so I don't think I'll jinx anything (famous last words!) by posting it:

image.jpeg.f6e4cd3bf2cd27f3b7682e42afaec1ea.jpeg 

Beautiful coin. From the colours visible I would think it will look even better in hand, when the light can capture them all.

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1 hour ago, Egry said:

Here are my mine from the Beachy Head Hoard. One of Balbinus and another of Pupienus both minted in Rome in 238 AD during the year of the six emperors. Both coins found in 1964 within the same coin hoard in Sussex England,

I would like to believe they were most likely minted in Rome at the same time, shipped to Britannia in the same chest, and buried along with over 3,000 others by one of the first ancient romans to receive them as change (purely speculation of course). 
 

Those are amazing. Balbinus and Pupienus! I believe 'Beachy Head' is actually about 5 hoards, all found near each other -  1879 (700 coins), 1899 (2,000 coins), 1961 (5,000 antoniniani), 1964 (3,000 denarii and antoniniani) and 1973 (3,000 antoniniani). 

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7 hours ago, John Conduitt said:

Those are amazing. Balbinus and Pupienus! I believe 'Beachy Head' is actually about 5 hoards, all found near each other -  1879 (700 coins), 1899 (2,000 coins), 1961 (5,000 antoniniani), 1964 (3,000 denarii and antoniniani) and 1973 (3,000 antoniniani). 

I always thought there were three hoards, but I’m not surprised that there were five. From what I found, any literature on these hoards is very sparse. If you have any leads on a more thorough account of what they found and what they believe is the historical significance please let me know.

My understanding that these were from the 1964 hoard. 

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Posted · Supporter

Here are two more from hoards not yet represented on the thread:

349289743_Gallienus-FortunaMSexNormanbyillust3542.jpg.ba0f3853eada0cb6ea9a64cab3af8467.jpg

GALLIENUS
AE Antoninianus. 3.33g, 19.2mm.
Mediolanum (Milan) mint, 2nd officina, issue 7, AD 266.
MIR 36, – [1353f]; RIC V (sole reign) 482; Cunetio 1745; Normanby 474 (this coin, illustrated).
O: IMP GALLIENVS P AVG, radiate bust right, with drapery on left shoulder.
R: FORT REDVX, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopiae; MS in exergue.
Ex N. M. McQ. Holmes Collection; ex Normanby Hoard (1985) [IRBCH 854], no. 474, purchased from C.J. Martin (Coins) Ltd., 1987

Pic of the coin from "The Cunetio and Normanby Hoards" book:

1905028253_Gallienus-FortunaMSexNormanbyPLATE3542.jpg.136453b700813f0f3010bc16af354c7a.jpg

 

And a Julia Maesa denarius from the 1953 Elveden hoard :

841835972_JuliaMaesa-SaecvliexKellyexElvedenHoard2995.jpg.cfb7d9557fdbb3c9362aba2e45dce31b.jpg

JULIA MAESA
AR Denarius. 3.08g, 19.5mm.
Rome mint, AD 220-222.
RIC 271; Cohen 45.
O: IVLIA MAESA AVG, draped bust right, hair bound in a bun at the back.
R: SAECVLI FELICITAS, Felicitas standing facing, her head to left, holding patera over burning altar in her right hand and long caduceus in her left; to right, star of eight rays.
Ex Michael Kelly Collection; ex Elveden Hoard, Suffolk, found 23 March 1953 (Numismatic Chronicle 14, pages 204-208, 1 of 7 in hoard)

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Posted (edited)
On 6/29/2022 at 11:30 PM, DonnaML said:

By pure coincidence, I've been keeping my eye out for a while for a Constantius II siliqua in nice condition that's verifiably from the East Harptree hoard. There always seem to be quite a few for sale on V-Coins, but I've never seen one that I felt compelled to buy. Until tonight, when this thread inspired me to take another look.  And lo and behold, I saw one from Lugdunum, recently added by a well-known U.S. dealer, that really spoke to me. It said "Buy Me"!  I was able (although it took a while) to find it pictured in one of the photos of the group lots in the 2016 Spink auction of East Harptree hoard siliquae, so I went ahead and bought it. The dealer has already confirmed the sale, and I've bought from him a number of times before without ever having a delivery issue, so I don't think I'll jinx anything (famous last words!) by posting it:

image.jpeg.f6e4cd3bf2cd27f3b7682e42afaec1ea.jpeg 

image.jpeg.137e7b6111a10fa1cdea0bfc5a0e9916.jpeg

The group lot in the Spink sale, with a dot under this coin:

image.jpeg.b618110c36c28dcba5edb785b10fd74e.jpeg

So that gives me a total of four Roman siliquae from British coin hoards, two each from the East Harptree and Vale of Pewsey hoards.

I should add that this Constantius II coin is one of 49 of this specific type in the East Harptree hoard, out of a total of 340 Constantius II coins, and a grand total of 1,496 coins of all emperors. See the 1888 Numismatic Chronicle article describing and enumerating the hoard, at pp. 39-40 No. 7 (https://archive.org/details/thirdnumismatic08royauoft/page/40/mode/1up :

image.jpeg.ab268d17907189198c9edd52a617e535.jpeg

image.jpeg.f2172f673042d68fa2b3f33870daf7ac.jpeg

Here's the breakdown by Emperor of the entire hoard:

image.jpeg.724d5acb5730dfdc13c9590d51020bfd.jpeg

Edited by DonnaML
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Here is my East Harptree Hoard coin

Julian II - AR Reduced Siliqua
Obv:– FL CL IVLIA-NVS P P AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VOTIS V MVLTIS X, within wreath
Minted in Lugdunum (//SLVG), Spring A.D. 360 - 26th June A.D. 363
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 227

17.26 mm. 2.0 gms. 0 degrees

East Harptree Hoard, which was discovered near Bath in 1887. There were 36 coins of this type found in the hoard.

RI_176l_img.jpg

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Dereham Hoard

Severus Alexander denarius


Obv:– IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate, draped bust right
Rev:– CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left holding patera and double cornucopiae
Minted in Antioch .
Reference(s) – RIC 275 (C). RSC 38. BMCRE ?

Ex Dereham hoard (found December 2004 and January 2007 ). Part of Lot 69 from the Dix Noonan Webb Auction containing the majority of the hoard sold in London on 9th April 2008.

3.58g. 18.73mm. 0 degrees

RI_077bj_img.jpg

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Egypt, Athens Imitative

Obv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Egypt from . B.C. 420 - 380.
Reference:– cf. SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526 (Athens),

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins where they graded it VF. The metal did not fill the die completely on the obverse resulting in the rough flat high area near Athena's temple. A test cut on the reverse was filled with pitch in antiquity.

The silver is quite bright making it relatively tricky to photograph.

From the Harald Ulrik Sverdrup Collection. Ex CNG. From a small hoard of 5 Athenian and 4 Athenian imitative issues.

Comment provided by Forum -
"Athenian tetradrachms with this droopy eye and bent back palmette have been identified as Egyptian imitative issues because they are most frequently found in Egypt and rarely in Greece.

Early in his reign the Egyptian Pharaoh Hakor, who ruled from 393 to 380 B.C., revolted against his overlord, the Persian King Artaxerxes. In 390 B.C. Hakor joined a tripartite alliance with Athens and King Evagoras of Cyprus. Persian attacks on Egypt in 385 and 383 were repulsed by Egyptian soldiers and Greek mercenaries under the command of the Athenian general Chabrias. Perhaps these coins were struck to pay the general and his Greek mercenaries."

17.157g, 25.3mm, 270o

Egypt_1a_img.jpg

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