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Roman Coins in Reverse - a Chronological Gallery


CPK

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@DonnaML All the coins are beautiful, but I have to admit I'm most taken by that Alexandrian elephant quadriga! A perfect example of the fact that grade isn't everything with ancient coins. The combination of patina and smooth surfaces make for a very appealing coin!

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Mailman arrived today with my wins from  the last auction. I didn't want to post this coin when I added my favorite Trajan reverses as it wasn't with me yet. But I certainly had it in mind. One of the coins I tried acquiring for a long time. Pefectly fits the theme...

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19,7 mm, 3.16g.

Trajan (98-117 AD). AR denarius, Rome AD 103-111

IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder / COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC, river god Danube reclining left on rocks, head right, holding prow and resting elbow upon overturned urn from which liquid flows; billowing cloak above, DANVVIVS in exergue.

RIC 100; BMCRE 395; RSC 136; Woytek 277b

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I would like to show a Trajan provincial with an interesting reverse.
Two figures of Artemis standing facing each other.
Why two?
Two temples of Artemis? 

 

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Trajan
Caria, Tabae
AE 24
Obv.: ΑΥ ΚΑ(Ι) ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΑΡΙ(Ϲ) ΓΕ(Ρ) ΔΑ, laureate head of Trajan right, with drapery on left shoulder
Rev: ΤΑΒΗΝΩΝ, two figures, side by side, of Artemis standing facing, wearing short chiton, drawing arrow from quiver with r. hand, holding bow in l.
AE, 24 mm., 9,28 g
Ref.: RPC III, 2289 (this coin)
Ex Lanz 154, 11–12 June 2012, lot 336

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30 minutes ago, shanxi said:

Two temples of Artemis? 

Maybe it has something to do with the two ladies? Artemisia I and Artemisia II of Caria. And their capital Halicarnassus? And the famous Artemis Temple there (for the region of Caria)? Both ladies were dynasts of Halicarnassus - and thus of the Caria region. Both were famous. Both were also revered. Perhaps also at that time in relation to the patron saint Artemis.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_I.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_II.

 

Both women were also very popular in Roman times! There are countless literary mentions from Roman times - from Pliny the Elder, Cicero, Valerius Maximus, Aulus Gellius, etc. - about both ladies. The two Artemesia should therefore have enjoyed great popularity in Trajan's time as well. Why not as the patron saint on the reverse of the coin?

Later issues by other emperors also show the two Artemis persons on the reverse. So it could well be a consolidated cult (originating locally in Caria).

 

Edited by Prieure de Sion
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Hadrian time : I have to go with this Salvs reverse, because it's Salvs and for its tremendous emarald green patina

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Hadrian, As - Rome mint, 126 CE
HADRIANUS AVGVSTVS, Laureate head of Hadrian right
SALVS AVGVSTI COS III, Salus standing left feeding snake arising from altar. SC in field
11.24 gr
Ref : RCV # 3692, Cohen # 1357

Q

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NGC2420229-011A.KowskyCollection.jpg.c3ee1eb144b8200c36b04927bd3ea9c9.jpg

CNG531lot711_2.jpg.6c08468a0a6a732d328bee1a57494ab0.jpg

Egypt, Alexandria. Hadrian, AD 117-138 (dated RY 22, AD 137-138). Billon Tetradrachm: 13.36 gm, 27 mm, 12 h. Obverse: Laureate bust of Hadrian, slight drapery visible. Reverse: Nilus holding a water reed & cornucopia, crocodile at his side. RPC III 6250; Dattari 1438; Emmett 879.22.

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 A selection of Hadrian reverses...

 1 denarius with Victory seated holding corona...

fFx9D8zc38XgK4qyeZf6nm2H52SkGc.jpg.08971987359ef84a932897cedccb0cda.jpg

 

2. denarius with Salus seated...

yi8P4pDQzf3ACfq6L5iQeAB77G2g9a.jpg.95ecfd3fec82b1a13a02f23e28c30b18.jpg

3. two sestertii with Fortuna seated holding cornucopia and rudder...

942956.jpg.9d007c407014f1666ef631babb0830d6.jpg

 

nc9L7tA4fa8DZen32Fyop6QJWpj5Wr.jpg.4a379bff58076cceb59f42f4b2e68009.jpg

 

4. Sestertius with Spes standing holding flower...

3LcaER4dtQS7jo2TrHp6y8FxA6s59Y.jpg.928c01f8dc241bab14be4d00179455dd.jpg

 

5. dupondius with reverse of Salus feeding snake....

867331.jpg.9709c46b3a67ce691813bb6da30aa8e0.jpg

 

6. dupondius with Virtus reverse...

z73D8tQ2Ndw4m7TpyD9GLmw6j2P8Cq.jpg.a561d5cefd1e41a8ae7ed19ccf16d21e.jpg

 

7. As with Goddess standing ;  I believe it is Fortuna as well on the reverse...

943541.jpg.0a31fc315c5e40ae5aa19e12b2bb4d3f.jpg

 

 8. One more sestertius of Hadrian with reverse depicting him being greeted by Roma upon his return to the city -  ADVENTVS...

2670404.jpg.d9fd8827d0d911002d9f605cb19fba5c.jpg

 

Edited by Octavius
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I have so many Hadrians -- 41 at the moment, even though I didn't win a single Hadrian lot in that massive Leu auction in July -- and so many of them have interesting reverses, that I'm going to have to divide my choices for him into three separate posts. I suppose one could say that my coins of Trajan, Hadrian, and Antoninus Pius form the core of both my Roman Imperial and my Roman Provincial collection. 

First and fewest, some Hadrian Provincials not from Roman Alexandria:

Hadrian, AR Tridrachm, Tarsus [= Tarsos], Province of Cilicia, AD 117-138 (undated). Obv. Laureate head right with drapery on far shoulder, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΘΕ ΤΡΑ ΠΑΡ ΥΙ ΘΕ ΝΕΡ ΥΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟⳞ ⳞΕ [ = Imperator Caesar divi Traiani Parthicus filius divi Nervae nepos Traianus Hadrianus Augustus] / Rev. Hittite/Cilician god Sandan (a/k/a Sandas)* wearing towered crown, striding right on back of a horned and winged lion (with curved goat horns**); Sandan wears bow-case and sword on left side (together with additional weapons [club and dagger?] worn at waist), and holds double axe and wreath (or crown) in his left hand, with a quiver(?) worn on his right side, and his right hand raised to point forward; ΤΑΡⳞΕΩΝ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩⳞ. 25.5 mm., 9.95 g.  RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 3266 (2015); RPC III Online 3266 (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/3266); BMC Vol. 21 Cilicia, Tarsus 145-146 at p. 186 [Hill, G.F., A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Lycaonia, Isauria, and Cilicia (London, 1900)]; Prieur 767 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]. Purchased from Aegean Numismatics, Mentor OH, Nov. 20, 2022

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*See CNG’s discussion of Sandan at https://www.cngcoins.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=376: “The cult of Sandan, or Sandas, is a remnant of the 17th century BC Hittite occupation of Cilicia. In his Luwian form he was Teshub, the god of mountain storms. Within the Hittite sanctuary at Yazilikaya he is depicted as a bearded god with conical headdress, holding a club and plant, probably related to the Mesopotamian Tree of Life. Like the rest of the Hittite High Gods, Teshub's feet never touch earth; he either rides the back of mythological beasts, is borne on the shoulders of lesser gods, or strides above the mountain tops. The mountain tops recall the lofty Hittite homeland, as does the high-peaked cap, and the pyramidal shape of Sandan's altar. While Sandan's cult in Tarsos became assimilated with that of Herakles, in his origins as a nature god he is more similar to the Greek king of the gods, Zeus.” 

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandas: “Sandas (more commonly spelt as "Sandan") was the Anatolian (Hittite) lion god during the Classical period. He used to be represented in association with a horned lion, and often resided inside a pyre surmounted by an eagle. Sandan was often associated to the Greek god Herakles, and sometimes to Marduk. In ceremonies, an image of the god was placed inside a pyre and was set on fire. Sandan appears in the coins of the Seleucids, as well as on other coins of Tarsus (Cilicia) during the time of the Roman emperors. In Tarsus, Sandon (sometimes spelled Sandes, Sandan, or Sanda) was visually represented as a mitre-wearing human form carrying a sword, a flower, or (commonly) an axe who stands on the back of a horned and winged lion.[1][2] Associated primarily with war and weather,[3] Sandon was the chief god in the Cilician pantheon from at least the beginning of the second millennium BC.[4] The ancient Greeks and Romans equated Sandon with Herakles.[5] A large monument to Sandon existed at Tarsus at least until the third century AD.” [Footnotes omitted.]

** For references to the idea of the horned lion on top of which Sandan stands being a goat-lion amalgamation, related to the Chimaera, see Attilio Mastrocinque, “Chimaera: Features of Near Eastern and Greek Mythology Concerning the Plague,” Journal of Ancient and Near Eastern Religions, Vol. 7 No. 2 at pp. 198-217 (2007), available at https://www.academia.edu/21694825/The_Cilician_God_Sandas_and_the_Greek_Chimaera.  Also regarding the author's comparison to the mythological Chimaera, note the long, sinuous, snake-like tail on this coin's goat-horned lion.

Hadrian, AR Tridrachm, Tarsus [= Tarsos], Province of Cilicia (SE Anatolia, now in Turkey), AD 117-138 (undated). Obv. Laureate head right, [ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΘΕ Τ]ΡA ΠΑΡ ΥΙ ΘΕ ΝΕΡ ΥΙ ΤΡΑI ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹEB / Rev. City-goddess Tyche, turreted and veiled, seated left on diphros [backless stool with four turned legs] (front leg & seat decorated as foreleg and wing of sphinx or griffin), holding palm branch in right hand and touching back corner of seat with left hand [type without cornucopiae in left hand]; at her feet to left, river-God Kydnos,* crowned with wreath of sedge-plant, swimming left with right arm upraised, [ΤΑ]Ρ-CΕΩΝ-ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩC. 23 mm., 9.39 g., 1 h. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 3262 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/3262; Prieur 761 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]; BMC Vol. 21 Cilicia, Tarsus 148 at p. 187 [Hill, G.F., A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Lycaonia, Isauria, and Cilicia (London, 1900)]; SNG France Cilicia 1401-1403 [Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France Vol. 2, Cilicia (Paris 1993)]. Purchased from Leu Numismatik AG, Winterthur, Switzerland, Web Auction 20, 16-18 Jul 2022, Lot 2065.

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 *The river-God Kydnos was the personification of the River Kydnos, which “had its headwaters in the Tarsos (Tarsus) Mountains on the Kilikian border with Syria and flowed into the Mediterranean near the city of Tarsos.” See https://www.theoi.com/Potamos/PotamosKydnos.html.

Hadrian, AR Didrachm, 128-138 AD, Caesarea, Cappadocia Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ - ϹΕΒΑϹΤΟϹ/ Rev. Club, handle at top, ΥΠΑΤΟϹ Γ ΠΑ-ΤΗΡ ΠΑΤΡΙΔΟϹ [ΥΠΑΤΟϹ Γ = COS III, 128-138 AD; ΠΑΤΗΡ ΠΑΤΡΙΔΟϹ = Pater Patriae]. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 3109 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/3109 ; Sydenham 280 [E. Sydenham, The Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia (1933)]; Metcalf, Caesarea 280 [Metcalf, W.E., The Silver Coinage of Cappadocia, Vespasian-Commodus. ANSNNM (American Numismatic Society, Numismatic Notes & Monographs) No. 166 (New York 1996)]; SNG Von Aulock 6422 [Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, Cappadocia, Cyprus, Imperial Cistophori, Posthumous Lysimachus, Alexander tetradrachms (Berlin, 1964)]; Ganschow 178d [Ganschow, T., Münzen von Kappadokien, Band 1 Konigreich und Kaisareia bis 192 n. Chr. (Istanbul 2018)]. 21 mm., 6.02 g. Double die match to CNG E-Auction 110, 16 Mar 2005, Lot 134. See https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coin/70825.

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Some interesting Hadrian reverses from my collection:

Roma seated with palladium

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Winged thunderbolt on a quadrans (or semis)

image.png.c5e78f30ed9e27bad4e0b887972f0c78.png

 

Lyre

image.png.e962e8d6ffaeacd7644b8a987b78f13c.png

 

Rome with victory on a semis 

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All these are Imperial coins. My most interesting Provincial of Hadrian is this Alexandrian tetradrachm with Sarapis and Cerberus. 

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Not extremely out of the ordinary, but I think this Sabina denarius is worth a mention - Venus with apple reverse. 

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Now, some (but not all!) of my Hadrian Provincials from Roman Alexandria. Please understand that most of the time, the reverse is the most important reason I buy a Roman Provincial coin, particularly a coin from Alexandria. Not always the case for Roman Imperials.

My apologies for the frequent repetition of the full citations to various catalogs; it would have taken too much time to edit all the descriptions.

Year 3:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 3 (118/119 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, drapery on left shoulder, AYT KAIC TPAIANOC -AΔΡΙΑNOC ϹƐΒ (clockwise from 5:00) / Rev. Serpent Agathodaemon standing erect right, crowned with pschent/skhent [the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt] , tongue protruding, with coils enfolding caduceus to left and stalks of corn to right; L - Γ (Year 3) across fields. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5149 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5149; Emmett 803.3; BMC 16 Alexandria 665 (at p. 79) (1892) [ill. as RPC Vol. III 5149, specimen 2]; K&G 32.68 (at p. 118); Dattari (Savio) 1541; Milne 918 at p. 25 [ill. as RPC Vol. III 5149, specimen 13] [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; Geissen 764 [ill. as RPC Vol. III 5149, specimen 18]. 24 mm., 13.81 g., 12 h.* Purchased from http://www.cgb.fr July 2021, ex Collection of Aymé Cornu (1926-2020).**

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*The serpent Agathodaemon or Agathos Daimon -- translated variously as good spirit, noble spirit, or good genius -- was sacred to Serapis, and was worshipped in every Egyptian town. “On the coins he is always represented erect, and usually wearing the skhent, in the midst of corn and poppies, generally with a caduceus, also rising from the ground.”  BMC 16 Alexandria, p. lxxxvi. The Numiswiki definition of Agathodaemon, at https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=Agathodaemon, states as follows: “Agathodaemon (Greek: ‘good spirit’) was a god of the vineyards and grainfields and of good luck, health and wisdom. It was customary to drink or pour out a glass of unmixed wine to honor him in every meal. He was the spouse or companion of Tyche Agathe (later Agatha). He was represented in art as a serpent or as a young man bearing a cornucopia and a bowl in one hand, and a poppy and an ear of corn [U.S.: grain] in the other. The agathodaemon was later adapted into a general daemon of good luck, particularly of the abundance of a family 's good food and drink.” 

    It should be noted that there is a wide variety of coin types showing the Agathodaemon, under Hadrian and other emperors (and empresses) from Nero to Gallienus. For example,  the serpent Agathodaemon frequently appears on tetradrachms, diobols, and drachms, and is shown both with and without the caduceus and corn stalks -- and, sometimes, when they are present, with the corn stalks to the left and the caduceus to the right. The Agathodaemon is also sometimes shown with the head of Serapis, and sometimes appears with the Uraeus snake facing it. As we know, it occasionally appears riding a horse. There is also a variety, at least for Hadrian, with a star in the right field of the obverse.

    The article entitled “The Agathos Daimon in Greco-Egyptian religion,” by João Pedro Feliciano, at https://www.academia.edu/27115429/The_Agathos_Daimon_in_Greco-Egyptian_religion, is quite informative, and it is worth quoting it extensively even though its primary focus is on the Agathodaemon as represented on stelae and statues, rather than on coins:

    “The Agathos Daimon, or ‘Good Spirit,’ was a multifaceted deity of ancient Mediterranean religion, usually depicted as a serpent, having its origins in the notion of the household god. The Good Spirit was honoured in both Greek and Roman religions, depicted as a serpent on Roman shrines and lararia, and honoured as a harbinger of luck among the Greeks. However, his most developed form flourished in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, where the Agathos Daimon became an exalted deity, far beyond the status of a household god, becoming associated with Shai and Kematef, the Egyptian creator gods, who were similarly depicted as serpents in the extant iconography, as well as taking on solar attributes and becoming conflated with Pre and Helios as a result of late Egyptian theological innovations. . . . .

    [T]he Agathos Daimon (Greek: agathos daimôn; also agathodaimôn), the ‘good spirit,’ [was] a typically serpentine deity who originated as a genius loci1 in traditional Greek religion, and was also invoked during banquets. A variant of this deity was Zeus Meilichios (invoked in Orphic Hymn 73, to Zeus as the Daimon), an old serpentine aspect of Zeus associated with fortune. Roman religion had a cognate genius figure as well, evidenced by the traditional snakes found on Roman domestic shrines and lararia. The origins of the guardian serpent archetype may be traced to the fact that snakes could protect a house from vermin, such as rodents, and consequently became associated with guardian spirits early on; this notion of the beneficent ‘house snake’  is found in several different cultures. . . . [Remainder of fn. omitted.]

**    Engineer - Head of the mass spectrometry laboratory at the Center for NuclearStudies in Grenoble, France; see https://data.bnf.fr/fr/12598408/aime_cornu/. Author of Cornu, Aymé: La Detection des Faux en Numismatique/The Detection of Counterfeit Coins (Köln (Schulten) 1987). Broschur; 296 x 210 mm. 78 S.

Year 10:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 10 (125/126 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right wearing paladumentum and aegis, seen from rear; around from 7:00, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ ϹƐΒ [translation: Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadrianus Augustus] / Rev. Laureate and draped bust of Zeus right, wearing himation; around, L ΔΕΚΑΤΟΥ [Year 10, spelled out]. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5598 (2015); RPC III Online 5598 at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5598; Emmett 903.10 (R2) [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; BMC 16 Alexandria 571 at p. 70 [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London, 1892)] [ill. RPC III Online 5598, Specimen 2 (primary illustration of type)] [same rev. leg.]; Milne 1100 at p. 28 [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins in Ashmolean Museum (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)] [ill. RPC III Online 5598, Specimen 7] [same rev. leg.]; Curtis 555 at p. 22 [James W. Curtis, The Tetradrachms of Roman Egypt (1969)] [same rev. leg.]; K&G 32.362 [Kampmann, Ursula & Ganschow, Thomas, Die Münzen der römischen Münzstätte Alexandria  (2008)] [rev. leg. var.]; SNG France 4, Alexandrie II 1474 [Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France Vol. 4, Alexandrie II, Hadrien – Antonin le Pieux – Nomes (Zurich 2018)] [rev. leg. var.] 26 mm., 13.30 g., 11 h. Purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, LLC [CNG] Electronic Auction 524, 28 Sep 2022, Lot 388. [Note: 5 of 7 illustrated examples at RPC show Zeus wearing taenia instead of laurel wreath.]

image.jpeg.12946ea4b77a20f3127b12fcff581729.jpeg

Year 11:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 11 (126/127 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Canopic Jar of Osiris (a/k/a Osiris-Canopus Jar and Osiris-Hydreios)* facing right, surmounted by Atef crown above ram[?] horns; body of jar with decorations including disk and horns below right, walking male figure to left; L ΕΝΔ - EKATΟΥ [= Year 11 spelled out]. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5640 (2015); RPC III Online 5640  at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5640; Köln 939 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band II (Hadrian-Antoninus Pius) (Cologne, 1978, corrected reprint 1987)]; Milne 1205 at p. 30 [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; Emmett 827.11 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; Dattari (Savio) 1327 [Savio, A. ed., Catalogo completo della collezione Dattari Numi Augg. Alexandrini (Trieste, 2007)].  25 mm., 13.41 g. (Purchased from Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., 212th Buy or Bid Sale, August 2020, Lot 497.)

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*See https://egypt-museum.com/post/189683370661/osiris-canopus-jar#gsc.tab=0, with photos of the Osiris-Canopus Jar from Hadrian’s Villa, now at the Vatican Museum, describing it as “A Canopic jar with the head of Osiris emerging from it. In the cult of Isis and Serapis, during the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Osiris-Canopus jars (also known as Osiris-Hydreios) were carried by priests during processions. As they are solid, each symbolically carried water from the Nile, fertility that originated from the god Osiris, one of Egypt’s earliest fertility gods. Osiris-Canopus was named after the ancient Egyptian town of Canopus, on the western bank at the mouth of the westernmost branch of the Delta known as the Canopic or Heracleotic branch – not far from Alexandria. Roman Period, ca. 131-138 AD. Grey basalt, from Hadrian’s Villa. Now in the Vatican Museums (Gregoriano Egizio). 22852.”

Year 11:

Hadrian, AE Nome Obol, Year 11 (126/127 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint (for Arsinoite Nome). Obv. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder, AΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ ϹΕΒ / Rev. Head of Egyptian Pharaoh right, no beard [identified with Amenemhat III, under Greco-Roman name of Pramarres], wearing nemes [royal striped headdress] with uraeus [sacred cobra, worn by deities and pharaohs] at forehead; APCI (= Arsi[noites]) to left, date L IA (Year 11) to right. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 6296 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/6296 ; Emmett 1211.11 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; BMC 16 Alexandria, Nomes 72-73 at p. 357 [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London, 1892)]; Sear RCV II 3831 (ill.); Köln 3381/82 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band II (Hadrian-Antoninus Pius) (Cologne, 1978, corrected reprint 1987)]; K&G N6.6; Milne 1229 at p. 30 (var. with beard; see p. 139 col. 2 bottom) [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]. 19.4 mm., 5.32 g. (Purchased from Zuzim Inc., Brooklyn, NY Jan 2021; ex Fontanille Coins, Auction 96, July 2017, Lot 7, sold as “the finest example [that dealer] ha[d] seen.”)*

[Obv. and rev. are switched in this dealer's photo.]

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*[The footnote is too lengthy to repeat here; I posted it most recently in @Ryro's thread last month about his own example of this type, at https://www.numisforums.com/topic/4506-pharoah-oah-oahhhh-a-rare-case-of-a-pharoahs-portrait-on-a-provincial-roman-coin-and-other-egyptian-iconography-on-ancient-coinage/#comment-56640 ]

 

Year 12:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 12 (127/128 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ  ΑΔΡΙΑ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Mummiform Ptah-Sokar-Osiris* standing right, wearing solar disk as headdress, holding was scepter tipped with jackal head, L ΔWΔƐ-ΚΑΤΟΥ [= Year 12 spelled out].  RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5713 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5713,  Emmett 883.12 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; BMC 16 Alexandria 637 & Pl. XXIII [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London, 1892)]; Sear RCV II 3732; Köln 982 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band II (Hadrian-Antoninus Pius) (Cologne, 1978, corrected reprint 1987)]; Dattari (Savio) 1445 [Savio, A. ed., Catalogo completo della collezione Dattari Numi Augg. Alexandrini (Trieste, 2007)]; Milne 1262 at p. 31 (scepter with jackal-head top) [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; K&G 32.458. 24 mm., 13.85 g., 11 h.

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*From the description in the CNG Triton XXI Catalog (Staffieri Collection, Jan 9. 2018) of the example from the Dattari Collection (No. 1445), sold in the Triton XXI auction as Lot 61: “The image of the Ptah-Sokar-Osiris divinity belongs to Egyptian theology, and in particular to funeral worship. It brings together three famous members of the Pharaonic Pantheon through their respective symbols: the headdress and scepter for Ptah, the solar disk for Osiris, and the mummiform wrappings for Sokar – the ‘Lord of the Necropolis.’ These three associated divinities call upon the concepts of ‘mourning’ and ‘life’, evoking at the same time the pain associated with death and the hope of resurrection. The main sanctuaries of Ptah, Sokar, and Osiris were at Memphis and Abydos.”

Year 16:

Hadrian, AE Diobol, Year 16 (131/132 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Isis as mother, crowned with disk and horns, seated right on throne, offering left breast to infant Harpocrates (Horus-as-child) sitting on her knee crowned with skhent and holding lotus stalk in left hand; on corners of back of throne, two hawks/falcons (representing Horus), facing each other, each wearing skhent, L - IϚ [= Year 16] across fields. Emmett 1138.16 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5813 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5813;  BMC 16 Alexandria 762 at p. 90 & PL. XVI [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London, 1892)]; Dattari (Savio) 1749 [Savio, A. ed., Catalogo completo della collezione Dattari Numi Augg. Alexandrini (Trieste, 2007)]; Köln 1046 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band II (Hadrian-Antoninus Pius) (Cologne, 1978, corrected reprint 1987)]; K&G 32.530 [Kampmann, Ursula & Ganschow, Thomas, Die Münzen der römischen Münzstätte Alexandria (2008)]; cf. Milne 1345-1346 at p. 33 [Isis seated left*] [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]. Purchased from Shick Coins, Ashdod, Israel, Dec. 2020; Israel Antiquities Authority Export License No. 42927, 02/02/2021. 23 mm., 8.6 g.

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*The description in Milne may be erroneous, since neither Emmett nor BMC 16 lists any diobols for Hadrian with Isis seated left holding Harpocrates, whether in Year 16 or any other year.

Year 17:

Hadrian, AE Drachm, Year 17 (AD 132/133), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑΙΑΝ -  ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Isis Pharia, holding billowing sail and sistrum above, sailing right in galley towards the Pharos of Alexandria, which has doorway in front and is surmounted by a statue as well as two tritons blowing seashell trumpets; [L]I – Z (Year 17) across lower fields behind and in front of Isis. 33 mm., 22.64 g., 12 h. Emmett 1002.17, K&G 32.547, RPC III Online 5838 (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5838), Milne 1373 at p. 33. Purchased Feb. 2022; ex Classical Numismatic Group, eAuction 384, Oct. 12, 2016, Lot 482.

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Year 18:

Hadrian, AE Drachm, Year 18 (133/134 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate head right wearing cloak (paladumentum) and cuirass, seen from behind, AVT KAIC TPAIAN - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Sphinx with female human head and body of lioness, seated left, crowned with kalathos, wearing long drop earrings, wings curled upwards, tail erect, right forepaw resting on wheel, LI - H (Year 18) across fields. RPC III Online 5915 (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5915 ), Emmett 1053.18, Milne 1427 at p. 34, BMC 16 Alexandria 848 at p. 99, K&G 32.603 (ill. p. 145), Dattari (Savio) 1996, Köln (Geissen) 1134 (same obverse die). Ex Economopoulos Numismatics, Holicong PA, Oct. 2021 (Nick Economopoulos, formerly of Pegasi Numismatics); ex CNG (Classical Numismatic Group), Mail Bid Sale 58, Lot 976, Sep. 19, 2001 (ill. at Catalog  p. 108). 33 mm., 26.23 g.

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Year 18:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 18 (133/134 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Serapis [associated with Hades] seated left on high-backed throne,  crowned with modius, wearing himation, holding scepter in left hand, and extending right hand downwards toward Cerberus/Kerberos seated to left at his feet; L IH [= Year 18] in left field.  RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5871 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5871;  BMC 16 Alexandria 620-621 at p. 74 & PL. XIII [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London, 1892)]; Köln 1095 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band II (Hadrian-Antoninus Pius) (Cologne, 1978, corrected reprint 1987)]; Dattari (Savio) 1480 [Savio, A. ed., Catalogo completo della collezione Dattari Numi Augg. Alexandrini (Trieste, 2007)]; Emmett 892.18 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; Milne 1394 at p. 34 [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; K&G 32.571 [Kampmann, Ursula & Ganschow, Thomas, Die Münzen der römischen Münzstätte Alexandria (2008)]. 25 mm., 12.42 g., 12 h.

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Year 18:

Hadrian, AE Drachm, Year 18 (133/134 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Serpents Agathodaemon* on left, coiled around a caduceus, and Uraeus [sacred cobra, worn by deities and pharaohs] on right, coiled around [poppies and] a sistrum, both serpents crowned with pschents/skhents [the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt], facing each other; LI - H (date) across fields. RPC Vol. III 5908 (2015) & RPC III Online 5908 at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5908; Milne 1424 (p. 34); Emmett 908.18; K&G 32.574; Dattari (Savio) 1991; BMC 16 Alexandria 844 (p. 92); Sear RCV II 3771 (date placement var.). 33 mm., 24.02 g., 12 h. Purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, LLC [CNG] Electronic Auction 531, 25 Jan 2023, Lot 701.  

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*See above, Year 3, for footnote re Agathodaemon.

Year 18:

Hadrian, AE Diobol, Year 18 (133/134 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from front, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Apis bull standing right before altar, with sun disk between its horns and crescent on its side; [L in exergue and] IH above bull (Year 18).  RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5928 (2015) &  RPC III Online 5928 at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5928 ; Emmett 1114.18; BMC 16 Alexandria 812 p. 95 (date placement var.) (ill. Pl. XXV & RPC Online 5928, example 1); Milne 1436 (date placement var.); Dattari (Savio) 1922. 24 mm., 7.90 g., 11 h. Purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, LLC [CNG] Electronic Auction 531, 25 Jan 2023, Lot 702.

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Year 19:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 19 (134/135 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate bust left, slight drapery; ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ Τ[ΡΑΙΑΝ] - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ (clockwise from upper right) [bracketed portion off flan] / Rev. Slightly draped bust of Nilus right, crowned with taenia and lotus-buds, cornucopiae behind right shoulder; L ЄN NЄAKΔ [= Year 19 spelled out] (clockwise from lower left). RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5941 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5941 ; Köln 1147 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band II (Hadrian-Antoninus Pius) (Cologne, 1978, corrected reprint 1987)]; Dattari (Savio) 7450-1 [Savio, A. ed., Catalogo completo della collezione Dattari Numi Augg. Alexandrini (Trieste, 2007)]; K&G 32.619 [Kampmann, Ursula & Ganschow, Thomas, Die Münzen der römischen Münzstätte Alexandria (2008)]; Milne 1449 at p. 35 [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; Emmett 875.19 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)].  24.5 mm., 13.10 g., 12 h.

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Year 19:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 19 (134/135 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate head left; around from 2:00, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ [translation into Latin: Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadrianus Augustus] / Rev. Draped bust of Serapis right, crowned with modius adorned with leaves (appearing as dots), wearing taenia and himation; around, L ƐΝ – ΝƐΑΚ•Δ [Year 19, spelled out]. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 5943 (2015); RPC III Online 5943 at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5943; Emmett 889.19 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; BMC 16 Alexandria 610 at p. 73 [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London, 1892)] [ill. RPC III Online 5943, Specimen 3 (primary illustration of type)] [same rev. leg.]; Milne 1100 at p. 28 [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins in Ashmolean Museum (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)] [ill. RPC III Online 5943, Specimen 27] [same rev. leg.]; K&G 32.362 [Kampmann, Ursula & Ganschow, Thomas, Die Münzen der römischen Münzstätte Alexandria  (2008)] [ill. p. 146, rev. leg. var.]; SNG France 4, Alexandrie II 1903 [Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France Vol. 4, Alexandrie II, Hadrien – Antonin le Pieux – Nomes (Zurich 2018)] [rev. leg. var.]; Dattari (1901 ed.) 1465 at p. 94 [ill. Pl. XXII; rev. leg. var.] [Dattari, Giovanni, Monete imperiali greche, Numi Augg. Alexandrini, Catalogo della collezione (Cairo 1901)]. 24.5 mm., 13.50 g., 12 h. Purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, LLC [CNG] Electronic Auction 524, 28 Sep 2022, Lot 390.

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Year 21:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 21 (AD 136/137), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate bust left, slight drapery on far shoulder, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Triptolemus standing right, wearing chlamys, in biga drawn by two winged serpents crowned with pschents/skhents [the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt], his left hand holding up front of chlamys to form a pouch filled with seeds, and his right hand raised to scatter the seeds, L KA (Year 21) above serpents to right. RPC Vol. III 6135 (2015) & RPC III Online 6135 at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/6135 (date placement var.; no example with this coin’s date placement in RPC or found in acsearch); Milne 1531 (same date placement, “above to right,” as this coin); SNG France 4, Alexandrie II 2007 (ill. Pl. an 21/1) (date placement var.); Emmett 900.21; K&G 32.723; Dattari (Savio) 1485 (obv. bust var. [right], date placement var., same specimen as Staffieri 90 [Triton XXI, 9 Jan 2018], ill. p. 52); BMC 16 Alexandria 582 (ill. Pl. II) (obv. bust var. [right], date placement var.); Sear RCV II 3746 (obv. bust var. [right], date placement var.). 23 mm., 12.90 g., 11 h. Purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, LLC [CNG] Electronic Auction 531, 25 Jan 2023, Lot 710.*

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*See https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=Triptolemus: “Triptolemus was a demi-god of the Eleusinian mysteries who presided over the sowing of grain-seed and the milling of wheat. His name means "He who Pounds the Husks."  In myth, Triptolemos was one of the Eleusinian princes who kindly received Demeter [Ceres] when she came mourning the loss of her daughter Persephone [Proserpina]. The young goddess was eventually returned to her from the Underworld, and Demeter in her munificence, instructed Triptolemos in the art of agriculture, and gave him a winged chariot drawn by serpents so that he might travel the world spreading her gift. 
Source: http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/EleusiniosTriptolemos.html.”

Year 22:

Hadrian, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 22 (137/138 AD), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right, ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Nilus seated left on rocks, crowned with lotus-buds, wearing himation around legs and over left arm, holding reed in right hand and cornucopiae in left; crocodile below climbing up rocks; L KB (Year 22) in left field. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 6254 (2015); RPC III Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/6254; Emmett 879.22 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; Milne 1570 at p. 37 [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; Köln.1241 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band II (Hadrian-Antoninus Pius) (Cologne, 1978, corrected reprint 1987)].  24 mm., 12.9 g.

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I will post some Hadrian Imperials with interesting reverses -- including a number of issues from the "Travel Series" -- later this evening or tomorrow.

 

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Cistophoric tetradrachm of Hadrian Nicomedia Mint 128 AD Obv Head right laureate. Rv. Facade of the octastyle temple of Rome and Augustus situated in the Commune Bithynia  Metcalf B1.8 RPC 969 10.54 grms 26 mm Photo by W. Hansen. 

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Hadrian greatly expanded the area in which the cistophoric standard was being struck. It is possible that this issue was struck at Rome. 

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How exactly does one follow @DonnaML's Hadrian extravaganza?! 🤯

A good place to start is with Hadrian's first issue, an eastern denarius proclaiming his legitimacy as the adopted son of Trajan:

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And here's another eastern denarius, with the Genius sacrificing reverse.  I find this reverse interesting as a precursor to the standard nummus reverse introduced in Diocletian's reform:

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Moving to provincials (which surely have the best reverse types!), here's an alternate reverse to the one Donna showed for a Tarsos tridrachm. This one hearkens back to the early staters of the city, e.g. under Mazaios, showing a lion attacking a bull (example shown just below):

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Continuing the theme of reaching back into history, here's an issue of Athens under Hadrian. It's the last ancient occurrence of the classic Athena/Owl type. Crudely made and at only 13mm and 2.41g, it doesn't quite live up to its ancestors:

image.jpeg.348bd6115dba2193e31ebb2b6a214e24.jpeg 

From Egypt, here's an Osiris canopus on a drachm:

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And the Uraeus serpent on a diobol:

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I'll close with this Sabina dupondius, which is an uninteresting Vesta seated with palladium, but I felt it was worthy of inclusion due to its anepigraphic design:

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P.S. I skipped Trajan, but I'll just pop in the boar that I love:

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5 hours ago, Octavius said:

 6. dupondius with Virtus reverse...

z73D8tQ2Ndw4m7TpyD9GLmw6j2P8Cq.jpg.a561d5cefd1e41a8ae7ed19ccf16d21e.jpg

 

@Octavius, your Hadrian dupondius with Virtus on the reverse looks a bit different from my specimen of RIC II.3 Hadrian 278 [bust variety A1: nude, no drapery, ill. Pl. 68 (2019 ed.)] (see below): it's equally clear that the personification is female, but the depiction is considerably less suggestive. What is that she's holding in her left hand? It doesn't look like a parazonium to me.

My specimen:

image.jpeg.4f371e20358173312bad09c3be915d28.jpeg

See RIC II.3 Introduction at p. 49, explaining that new messages seen during the 119-121 period include “Honos and Virtus, celebrating the Emperor’s honour and courage. Honos is a relatively rare male personification. The more commonplace Virtus is female but she demonstrates the masculine nature of her message – vir = man in Latin – by holding a parazonium [large dagger in ornamental scabbard with bulbous end] in a distinctly phallic pose.”

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Hadrian, AD 117-138. AV Aureus (19.5mm, 7.19g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 117. Obv IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA PARTH F; Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing balteus. Rev: • DIVI • NER • NEP • P M • TR • P • COS around, ORIENS in exergue, radiate and draped bust of Sol right. Ref: RIC II.3 50; Calicó 1293; BMCRE 35; Biaggi 625. Reddish toning in Sol’s crown. Very Fine. Ex CNG 120 (11 May 2022), Lot 830. 

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Some other interesting reverses among my Hadrian Imperials.

Hadrian, AR Denarius, AD 117 (Aug-Dec), Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate and cuirassed bust right with exposed upper part of breastplate visible with balteus strap, IMP CAE DI TRA PAR F DI NER NEP TRA HADRIANO AVG / Rev. Trajan standing right, clasping hands with Hadrian standing left, Trajan holds scroll in upraised left hand, [TRIBVNIC][off flan] POTESTAS; in exergue, ADOPTIO. RIC II.3 2960 at p. 278 (ill. Pl. 49) (frequency “R2”) (2019 ed.); old RIC II 22C (1926 ed.) (leg. corr.); RSC II Hadrian 7a (Antioch); Strack *4 corr. [citing example in Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum (No. 8668); see RIC II.3 2960 at p. 278 n. 1442, correcting Strack’s erroneous rendition of legend]; BMCRE III Hadrian, p. 243 No. 3 [citing example in Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum (No. 8668)]. 17x18 mm., 2.64 g. Purchased at St. James’s Auctions, Auction 65, 21 Sep 2022, Lot 1039.*

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*This unusual “Eastern” Imperial denarius was issued together with RIC II.3 2959 at the beginning of Hadrian’s reign, when he was the governor of Syria, headquartered in Antioch. See McAlee p. 216 [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]:

“When Hadrian succeeded Trajan as emperor in August 117 he was the governor of Syria, so that province and its capital, Antioch, were at the center of the political events at the beginning of Hadrian’s reign. [Discussion of Hadrian’s early Syrian tetradrachms, including the transfer of the provincial mint from Tyre to Antioch before the end of the year 117, omitted.] . . . . Hadrian also struck denarii in Syria, and was the first emperor to do so since Vespasian [who was himself the first emperor to strike Roman imperial aurei and denarii in Syria; see id. p. 152]. (Not coincidentally, Vespasian also came to power while he was a Roman governor in the east.) The earliest type – presumably struck in 117 – has a legend with the honorific titles adopted from Trajan and a reverse showing Trajan and Hadrian standing together and clasping hands, with ADOPTIO in the exergue. The legend and portrait style are similar to those seen on the first issue of tetradrachms with eagle on club ([McAlee] no. 529), attributed here to Tyre.”  

See this example (not mine) of the obverse portrait on McAlee 529 (taken from specimen # 14 at RPC III Online 3684):

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There is certainly a similarity in style to the portrait of Hadrian on the obverse of my denarius (RIC II. 3 2960).

In terms of rarity, RIC II.3 classifies this type as “R2” (“very rare”), by contrast to RIC II. 3 2959, which is classified as only “R” (rare). (Note that unlike the old RIC, the frequency analysis is based not only on museum collections, but on the frequency of specimens sold on the market.) The only museum specimen listed either in RIC II.3 or in OCRE (and cited in Strack) is an example at the Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum (No. 8668). The British Museum does not appear to have an example of this type; instead, as noted above, it cites the Vienna specimen. (See BMCRE III Hadrian, p. 243 No. 3 & fn.)  Other than my example, I have found only four other specimens listed on ACSearch. 

Hadrian, AR Denarius, AD 120-121, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right, bare chest, slight drapery on far shoulder, IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG / Rev. Hadrian, togate, seated left on platform at right, extending right hand towards citizen standing right below platform, holding out fold of toga to right to receive gift [bag of coins?] tossed to him by Hadrian, P M T - R P - COS III; in exergue, [L]IBERAL AV[G / III] in two lines. RIC II.3 Hadrian 309 (2019 ed.) [see http://numismatics.org/collection/1911.23.111 (ANS) for similar example]; Old RIC II 129b (1926 ed.); RSC II Hadrian 909; BMCRE III Hadrian 292 [matching rev. legend break]/293 [matching obv. portrait] at pp. 275-276. 17 mm., 2.96 g, 6 h. Purchased 6 Jan. 2022  from Roma Numismatics E-Sale No. 93, Lot 982. [Commemorates third liberalitas (gift or donation) by Hadrian to citizens of Rome, on anniversary of Rome’s founding.]

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Hadrian, AR Denarius, Rome Mint, AD 121 (late) - 123 (Group 3, see RIC II.3 p. 109). Obv. Laureate head right (no drapery, truncation with part of upper shoulder line viewed from behind), IMP CAESAR TRAIAN – HADRIANVS AVG / Rev. Oceanus with crab-claw horns, reclining left, leaning on dolphin (tail up) with head propped on left hand, holding up anchor with right hand, P M – TR P COS – III. 19 mm., 3.17 g. RIC II.3 520 (ill. Pl. 12) (2019 ed.) (“Scarce”), RSC II 1109, Sear RCV II 3518 (ill. p. 149) BMCRR III Hadrian 127. Purchased from Noonans (Noonans Mayfair Ltd., London, UK), Auction 269, 8 March 2023, Lot 628 [with old coin envelope, possibly from C.J. Martin, London UK].*

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*See BMCRR III, Hadrian Introduction, p. cxxxii: “Oceanus, picturesquely defined by claws on the head, dolphin and anchor at side, clearly marks the way of Hadrian to Britain.” (Hadrian traveled from Gaul to Britain in AD 122; see Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990), p. 109.) To the best of my knowledge, after searching OCRE, this type is the first of only three Roman Imperial coins to depict Oceanus. See John Melville Jones, A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins (London, Seaby, 1990), entry for “Oceanus” at p. 225: “In Greek and Roman mythology this was the name of the river which was believed to encircle the earth. He was represented in art in the form of a river god with added marine attributes. Oceanus is found on a denarius of Septimius Severus of AD 209, alluding to the emperor’s crossing to Britain, and on a medallion of Constans I (see Bononia).”

Hadrian, AR Denarius, Rome Mint, AD 126-127 [see RIC II.3 p. 132: Group 6]. Obv. Laureate head right with slight drapery on far shoulder, HADRIANVS – AVGVSTVS / Rev. Seven stars (septentriones)* within and above crescent moon (points of crescent upwards), COS III above. RIC II.3 852 (ill. Pl. 19) (2019 ed.), old RIC II 202 (1926 ed.), RSC II 466, BMCRE III Hadrian 464, Sear RCV II 3485. 18 mm., 3.18 g. Purchased from Noonans Auction 13-14 July 2022, Lot 949; ex Seaby (retail purchase 1979).

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*Referred to as such at RIC II.3 p. 853. The septentriones were the seven brightest stars within the Ursa Major constellation, forming an asterism currently known in the USA as the “Big Dipper,” and in the UK as the “Plough.” See https://oikofuge.com/septentrionate/;   https://www.britannica.com/place/Ursa-Major.

Hadrian, AR Denarius, Rome Mint AD 126-127 [see RIC II.3 p. 132: Group 6]. Obv. Laureate bust right with slight drapery on far shoulder, HADRIANVS – AVGVSTVS / Rev. Six-pointed star within crescent moon (points of crescent upwards), COS III above. RIC II.3 864 (ill. Pl. 20) (2019 ed.), old RIC II 200 (1926 ed.), RSC II 460, BMCRE III Hadrian 457, Sear RCV II 3484 (ill. p. 145). 18x19 mm., 3.27 g.  Purchased from cgb.fr, 13 May 2022.

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Now to the Travel Series/"Provinces Cycle," and related coins.

Hadrian AR Denarius [sometimes considered part of Travel Series], ca. 130 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 168: Group 9, “time of the visit to Egypt”), Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust left, with slight drapery on far (right) shoulder, HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P / Rev. Galley sailing left with four rowers, pilot facing left seated in shelter at stern, acrostolium* at prow, FELICTATI // AVGVSTI (in exergue).  RIC II.3 Hadrian 1401 & Pl. 28 (Head type A2) (2019 edition), old RIC 240 (1926 ed.), RSC II 713a, BMCRE III Hadrian 625, Foss 108a [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 18 mm., 3.26 g., 6 h. Purchased at Nomos Obolos Auction 22, 6 March 2022, Lot 602 (“Scarce issue with Hadrian facing to the left”).

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*See https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=Acrostolium: “An ornamental extension of the stem post on the prow of an ancient warship. Often used as a symbol of victory or of power at sea.” 

Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”). Obv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / Rev: AEGYPTOS, Egypt reclining left, holding sistrum in right hand and resting left arm on basket; to left, ibis standing right. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1482 & Pl. 30 (2019 edition), old RIC II 297d (1926 ed.), RSC II 99, Sear RCV II 3456, BMCRE III Hadrian 801-3, Foss 95 at p. 118 (dating Hadrian’s travels in Egypt to AD 130) [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 18 mm., 3.11 g., 7 hr. 

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bare head left, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Africa reclining left, leaning with left elbow on rock, wearing elephant-skin headdress, holding scorpion with extended right hand and cradling cornucopiae with left hand and arm, basket of grain-ears to left at her feet, AFRICA. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1497 & Pl. 31 (2019 edition) (see http://numismatics.org/ocre/id/ric.2_3(2).hdn.1497); old RIC II Hadrian 299 (1926 ed.) var. (head right), RSC II Hadrian 137, Sear RCV II 3459 obv. var. (laureate head left), BMCRE III Hadrian 821 var. (this type cited at BMCRE 821 fn. at p. 344); Foss 81 at p. 117 (dating Hadrian’s travels in the province of Africa to AD 128) [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 18 mm., 3.31 g. Purchased from Akropolis Ancient Coins, Jan. 2022.

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bareheaded and draped bust right, viewed from back or side, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Alexandria, draped, standing left, holding sistrum in extended right hand and basket in left hand with snake emerging from it and situla (water pail) hanging below*; ALEX-AN-DRIA. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1504 & Pl. 31 (2019 edition), old RIC II 300 (1926 ed.), RSC II 156, BMCRE III Hadrian 826, Foss 94a, Sear RCV II 3460 (obv. var.). Purchased from Dix Noonan Webb Auction 253, 13 March 2022, Lot 1408; ex B.A. Seaby Ltd. London, retail purchase 1990 (with coin envelope from Seaby).

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*See Strack (1933) at p. 164, stating that the round object beneath the basket is a situla, Isis' normal two-part water pail or container, hanging from her left wrist in the coin type: "am Handgelenk hängt das der Isis eigene zweiteilige Wassergefäss." It certainly makes sense that Alexandria would have some more of the attributes of Isis in Romano-Egyptian iconography -- just like "Aegyptos" -- given that she already holds a sistrum.

Wikipedia describes a situla as a bucket or pail, and specifically mentions it as an attribute of Isis. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Situla:

"The term is also used for pails carried by figures in other art forms; according to Plutarch and other sources this was a sign of a devotee of Isis, who herself is often shown carrying one (containing water from the sacred Nile), of a rather different shape, with a rounded bottom, and sometimes lidded. This rounded shape, often with a "nipple" at the bottom (see Luristan example in gallery), is believed to have represented the female breast.[14] These were also donated to temples as votive offerings by devotees."

Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bare head right, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Asia standing left, right foot on prow, holding reaping hook [or acrostolium*] with right hand, and rudder with left hand, A S I A. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1507 & Pl. 32 (2019 edition); old RIC II Hadrian 301 (1926 ed.), RSC II Hadrian 188 (ill. p. 114), Sear RCV II 3462 (ill. p. 143), BMCRE III Hadrian 829, Foss 57 at p. 116 (dating Hadrian’s travels in the Province of Asia to AD 123-125)  [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)] . 18.5 mm., 3.4 g. [Part of Hadrian’s Travel Series, commemorating his travel to the Asia Province -- located in northwest Anatolia, largely comprising the former kingdom of Lydia -- in 123 AD. See Edward A. Sydenham, Historical References on Coins of the Roman Empire (1968 ed.; orig. pub. 1917) at p. 96. But see https://followinghadrian.com/hadriantravels, placing Hadrian’s visit to Asia in 124 AD, including its capital Ephesus on 29 Aug. 124.] 

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*The new edition of RIC II (RIC II.3 1507) describes the object in Asia’s right hand as a “reaping hook.” The old RIC describes it as a “hook”; RSC as a hook or an acrostolium; Sear RCV as an “acrostolium(?),” with the rudder in her left hand called a steering-oar. Numiswiki defines an acrostolium as an “ornamental extension of the stem post on the prow of an ancient warship. Often used as a symbol of victory or of power at sea.” See https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=Acrostolium. I think it is impossible to tell from my example which it is, although it certainly does not look particularly “ornamental.”

Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cyle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 146]. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right with drapery covering cuirass, viewed from behind, right shoulder forward, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Germania standing facing with head right, holding spear in right hand and resting left hand on shield, GER – MANIA. RIC II.3 1525 (ill. Pl. 32) (2019 ed.), RSC II 806b, BMCRE III Hadrian 839, Strack 301, Sear RCV II 3496 (obv. bust var.). 17.5 mm., 3.15 g. Purchased from Gorny & Mosch Auction 289, 11 Oct. 2022, Lot 819.

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cyle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 147]. Obv.  Laureate head right, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Italia standing three-quarters left, holding sceptre in right hand and cornucopiae in left, ITA – LIA. RIC II.3 1540 (ill. Pl. 33) (2019 ed.); RSC II 869 (ill. p. 139); BMCRE III Hadrian 853 (ill. Pl. 63 no. 14), Sear RCV II 3499 (obv var. bare head). 17 mm., 2.76 g. Purchased from Noonans (Noonans Mayfair Ltd., London, UK), Auction 269, 8 March 2023, Lot 646; ex Spink & Son Ltd. (with old Spink coin envelope & coin tag stating price of 80 GBP).

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cyle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 148]. Obv. Bare-headed draped bust right, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Nilus, naked to waist, reclining right, resting right arm on urn[?] and holding cornucopiae in left hand; above Nilus’s feet, hippo standing left with head raised towards Nilus (mouth open, left ear visible), leaning against Nilus’s upraised left knee [or a rock?]; crocodile right in waters below; NILVS above.  RIC II.3 1547 (ill. Pl. 33) (2019 ed.); RSC II 990; BMCRE III Hadrian 860; Sear RCV II 3508 (ill. p. 148) (obv. var. laureate head). 18x19 mm., 3.30 g. Purchased from Noonans (Noonans Mayfair Ltd., London, UK), Auction 269, 8 March 2023, Lot 647; ex C.J. Martin Coins (London, UK) (purchased Dec. 1997) (see notation on old coin envelope accompanying coin).

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The hippo leaning against Nilus is a bit difficult to distinguish at first glance; here's a close-up:

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 150]. Obv. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Hadrian togate, standing left, holding volumen (scroll) in left hand; with his right hand, clasping right hand of Africa and about to raise her from her kneeling position, right; she wears elephant skin headdress and holds grain ears with her left hand; between them, two stalks of grain; RESTITUTORI – AFRICAE. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1569 & Pl. 34 (2019 edition); old RIC II Hadrian 322 (1926 ed.); RSC II Hadrian 1223a; BMCRE III Hadrian 871; Sear RCV II 3533; Foss 80 at p. 117 (dating Hadrian’s relevant trip to AD 128) [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 17x19 mm., 3.41 g.  Purchased from Noonans Auction 13-14 July, 2022, Lot 988. 

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 150]. Obv. Laureate and draped bust right, viewed from behind, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Hadrian togate, standing left, holding volumen (scroll) in left hand; he clasps right hands with Hispania to raise her from her kneeling position, right, holding an olive branch over her left shoulder, with a rabbit crouching between them, right; RESTITVTORI – HISPANIAE. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1582 (at p. 180)  & Pl. 35 (2019 edition); old RIC II Hadrian 327 (1926 ed.); RSC II Hadrian 1260a (rev. ill. p. 152); BMCRE III Hadrian 890 [BM Collection 1939,0109.10]; Sear RCV II 3535 (obv. bust var., rev. ill. p. 150). 16.5 mm., 3.32 g., 6 h. Purchased from CNG (Classical Numismatic Group, LLC) Electronic Auction 525, 20 Oct. 2022, Lot 1140; ex. “Cloudsley Collection,” originally purchased at retail from Spink & Son, Ltd. (with old Spink ticket & envelope).

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 207: Group 11, “including Adventus to Rome of 133”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bare head right, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Roma standing right in military dress, with right shoulder bare, holding inverted spear with left hand, receiving the arriving Emperor Hadrian standing left, togate, bearing a scroll in left hand, the two clasping their right hands, ADVE-NTVS AVG. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1984 & Pl. 35 (2019 edition), old RIC II Hadrian 225a (1926 ed.), RSC II Hadrian 84a, Sear RCV II 3455 (ill. p. 143), BMCRE III Hadrian 581. 18 mm., 3.46 g. [Part of or ancillary to Hadrian’s Travel Series, commemorating Hadrian’s arrival in Rome (adventus) at the end of his travels.]

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1 hour ago, DonnaML said:

@Octavius, your Hadrian dupondius with Virtus on the reverse looks a bit different from my specimen of RIC II.3 Hadrian 278 [bust variety A1: nude, no drapery, ill. Pl. 68 (2019 ed.)] (see below): it's equally clear that the personification is female, but the depiction is considerably less suggestive. What is that she's holding in her left hand? It doesn't look like a parazonium to me.

My specimen:

image.jpeg.4f371e20358173312bad09c3be915d28.jpeg

See RIC II.3 Introduction at p. 49, explaining that new messages seen during the 119-121 period include “Honos and Virtus, celebrating the Emperor’s honour and courage. Honos is a relatively rare male personification. The more commonplace Virtus is female but she demonstrates the masculine nature of her message – vir = man in Latin – by holding a parazonium [large dagger in ornamental scabbard with bulbous end] in a distinctly phallic pose.”

 I believe my dupondius is RIC Hadrian 605, bust of Hadrian , right with slight drapery over left shoulder.  Under magnification it looks like the weak representation of a parazonium merges with a corroded area, but there is something there. The coin definitely looks struck to me and not a cast. wt is 12.9gms.  Virtus on my coin looks a little sinuous , but to me it appears genuine.

By the way, I love your denarius with crescent moon and stars - it's on my wish list!

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20 minutes ago, Octavius said:

 I believe my dupondius is RIC Hadrian 605,

605 is the old RIC II Hadrian number, from the 1926 edition, for the same type as my specimen (RIC II.3 Hadrian 278 in the 2019 edition). So our examples belong to the same issue, but obviously are from different dies. 

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I hope it will not be taken amiss, but I have to split my post for Hadrian into two parts.  Part 1 will look at some interesting (I think) denarii for Hadrian (and an associate).  For part two I am planning a bit of a style show for his wife Sabina.  I will post that tomorrow a.m. 

 

Hadrian was elevated to the imperial throne in 117 AD and issued coins for his first two consulships.  All the coins I will show for Hadrian's imperial denarii are from the extensive coinage of his third consulship; i.e. the COS III coinage from 119-138 AD.  The many types can be clustered by the form of the obverse inscriptions. Here I merely sample a bit.

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Hadrian  124-128
BMCRE 460    denarius of Rome
   3.21g

Laureate, bust to r.
HADRIANVS     AVGVSTVS

Star in Crescent, globe below
left: COS (up)     right: III (down)

 

2-Hadrian-den01b.jpg.c631756ab02b82caec7843a8a439cc43.jpg

Hadrian  124-128
BMCRE 463    denarius of Rome
     3.43g

Laureate, beardless bust to r.
HADRIANVS     AVGVSTVS

 7 stars in crescent
left: COS (up)     right: III

 

The proliferation of types at this next point in his reign Mattingly attributes to Hadrian's return to Rome following his extended tour of the empire.

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Hadrian  134-138
BMCRE 621     denarius of Rome
    3.67g

Laureate bust to r.
left: HADRIANVS (ascending)     right: AVG COSIII PP (descending)

Galley w/ Pilot under arch of stern, and rowers, headed to r
above: FELICITATI    below: AVGVSTI

The treatment of the obverse legends dates this coin to the period 134-138

 

The next two coins Mattingly classes as "Province types"

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Hadrian  134-138
BMCRE 797    denarius of Rome 
   3.21g

Laureate bust to r.
left: HADRIANVS (ascending)     right: AVG COSIII PP (descending)

This beardless rendering (due to wear?) is an unusual portrait for Hadrian.

Aegyptos reclining, holds sistrum above in R hand, leans on basket with L arm; ibis stands at her feet at L,
above: AEGYPTOS

 

5-Hadrian-den06b.jpg.2c2fd537b898eab861c1cbe20fd56de8.jpg

Hadrian  134-138
BMCRE 846     denarius of Rome 
   3.23g

Laureate bust to r.
left: HADRIANVS (ascending)     right: AVG COSIII PP (descending)

 

Hispania draped, reclining L, holding up olive branch in r hand; resting L arm on rock at her feet L a rabbit
above: HISPANIA

 

This next coin Mattingly classes as a "RESTITVTOR" type

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Hadrian  134-138
BMCRE 883 reverse as 886 but obverse bust to r.    denarius of Rome
    3.09g

Laureate bust to r.
left: HADRIANVS (ascending)     right: AVG COSIII PP (descending)

Hadrian bare headed,togate, standing left extending R hand to Hispania holding branch close on left. (no rabbit)
RESTITVTO - RI HI SPANI - AI

 

Succession

Lucius Ceionius Commodus was adopted by Hadrian in 136 as his heir apparent, and renamed Lucius Aelius Verus "Ceasar."  That same year, Hadrian ordered the deaths of two members of his extended houshold who would have been presumptive heirs.  Within two years, however, Lucius died of tuberculosis.  Lesson learned, within a month of that death, Hadrian adopted Antoninus Pius as heir apparent, insisting however, that Antoninus must adopt two successors, one of whom was to be the son of Aelius, i.e. Lucius Verus. (Note the consulship numbering is that of Aelius.)

 

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Lucius Aelius   137 AD
BMCRE  971  denarius of Rome   

bust r
ascending r: L. AELIVS          descending l: CAESAR

Fortuna Spes standing front, head L holding flower in R hand, cornucopiae rudder in L.
left: TRPO T (ascending)    right:COSII (descending)

 

While the inscriptions have the same content for this coin and the next, the devil is in the details.  More obvious are the differences in the central figure on the reverse. These are but two of the six different figures adorning the reverses of these rare coins.

 

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Lucius Aelius   137 AD
BMCRE  972  denarius of Rome   

bust r.
L AELIVS        CAESAR


Pietas veiled, draped, standing L dropping incense from R hand over altar L and holding box? with lid raised in L
left: TRPOT (ascending)    right:COSII (descending)

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Octavius said:

Under magnification it looks like the weak representation of a parazonium merges with a corroded area, but there is something there. 

Looking at your example more closely, I think I do see the parazonium -- it's more upright than the one on my example, and is somewhat obscured by what must be Virtus's left arm. Which is what confused me initially.

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14 hours ago, Octavius said:

 A selection of Hadrian reverses...

 1 denarius with Victory seated holding corona...

fFx9D8zc38XgK4qyeZf6nm2H52SkGc.jpg.08971987359ef84a932897cedccb0cda.jpg

 

2. denarius with Salus seated...

yi8P4pDQzf3ACfq6L5iQeAB77G2g9a.jpg.95ecfd3fec82b1a13a02f23e28c30b18.jpg

3. two sestertii with Fortuna seated holding cornucopia and rudder...

942956.jpg.9d007c407014f1666ef631babb0830d6.jpg

 

nc9L7tA4fa8DZen32Fyop6QJWpj5Wr.jpg.4a379bff58076cceb59f42f4b2e68009.jpg

 

4. Sestertius with Spes standing holding flower...

3LcaER4dtQS7jo2TrHp6y8FxA6s59Y.jpg.928c01f8dc241bab14be4d00179455dd.jpg

 

5. dupondius with reverse of Salus feeding snake....

867331.jpg.9709c46b3a67ce691813bb6da30aa8e0.jpg

 

6. dupondius with Virtus reverse...

z73D8tQ2Ndw4m7TpyD9GLmw6j2P8Cq.jpg.a561d5cefd1e41a8ae7ed19ccf16d21e.jpg

 

7. As with Goddess standing ;  I believe it is Fortuna as well on the reverse...

943541.jpg.0a31fc315c5e40ae5aa19e12b2bb4d3f.jpg

 

 8. One more sestertius of Hadrian with reverse depicting him being greeted by Roma upon his return to the city -  ADVENTVS...

2670404.jpg.d9fd8827d0d911002d9f605cb19fba5c.jpg

 

Wonderful group of coins 🤩!

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8 hours ago, DonnaML said:

Some other interesting reverses among my Hadrian Imperials.

Hadrian, AR Denarius, AD 117 (Aug-Dec), Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate and cuirassed bust right with exposed upper part of breastplate visible with balteus strap, IMP CAE DI TRA PAR F DI NER NEP TRA HADRIANO AVG / Rev. Trajan standing right, clasping hands with Hadrian standing left, Trajan holds scroll in upraised left hand, [TRIBVNIC][off flan] POTESTAS; in exergue, ADOPTIO. RIC II.3 2960 at p. 278 (ill. Pl. 49) (frequency “R2”) (2019 ed.); old RIC II 22C (1926 ed.) (leg. corr.); RSC II Hadrian 7a (Antioch); Strack *4 corr. [citing example in Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum (No. 8668); see RIC II.3 2960 at p. 278 n. 1442, correcting Strack’s erroneous rendition of legend]; BMCRE III Hadrian, p. 243 No. 3 [citing example in Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum (No. 8668)]. 17x18 mm., 2.64 g. Purchased at St. James’s Auctions, Auction 65, 21 Sep 2022, Lot 1039.*

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*This unusual “Eastern” Imperial denarius was issued together with RIC II.3 2959 at the beginning of Hadrian’s reign, when he was the governor of Syria, headquartered in Antioch. See McAlee p. 216 [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]:

“When Hadrian succeeded Trajan as emperor in August 117 he was the governor of Syria, so that province and its capital, Antioch, were at the center of the political events at the beginning of Hadrian’s reign. [Discussion of Hadrian’s early Syrian tetradrachms, including the transfer of the provincial mint from Tyre to Antioch before the end of the year 117, omitted.] . . . . Hadrian also struck denarii in Syria, and was the first emperor to do so since Vespasian [who was himself the first emperor to strike Roman imperial aurei and denarii in Syria; see id. p. 152]. (Not coincidentally, Vespasian also came to power while he was a Roman governor in the east.) The earliest type – presumably struck in 117 – has a legend with the honorific titles adopted from Trajan and a reverse showing Trajan and Hadrian standing together and clasping hands, with ADOPTIO in the exergue. The legend and portrait style are similar to those seen on the first issue of tetradrachms with eagle on club ([McAlee] no. 529), attributed here to Tyre.”  

See this example (not mine) of the obverse portrait on McAlee 529 (taken from specimen # 14 at RPC III Online 3684):

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There is certainly a similarity in style to the portrait of Hadrian on the obverse of my denarius (RIC II. 3 2960).

In terms of rarity, RIC II.3 classifies this type as “R2” (“very rare”), by contrast to RIC II. 3 2959, which is classified as only “R” (rare). (Note that unlike the old RIC, the frequency analysis is based not only on museum collections, but on the frequency of specimens sold on the market.) The only museum specimen listed either in RIC II.3 or in OCRE (and cited in Strack) is an example at the Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum (No. 8668). The British Museum does not appear to have an example of this type; instead, as noted above, it cites the Vienna specimen. (See BMCRE III Hadrian, p. 243 No. 3 & fn.)  Other than my example, I have found only four other specimens listed on ACSearch. 

Hadrian, AR Denarius, AD 120-121, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right, bare chest, slight drapery on far shoulder, IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG / Rev. Hadrian, togate, seated left on platform at right, extending right hand towards citizen standing right below platform, holding out fold of toga to right to receive gift [bag of coins?] tossed to him by Hadrian, P M T - R P - COS III; in exergue, [L]IBERAL AV[G / III] in two lines. RIC II.3 Hadrian 309 (2019 ed.) [see http://numismatics.org/collection/1911.23.111 (ANS) for similar example]; Old RIC II 129b (1926 ed.); RSC II Hadrian 909; BMCRE III Hadrian 292 [matching rev. legend break]/293 [matching obv. portrait] at pp. 275-276. 17 mm., 2.96 g, 6 h. Purchased 6 Jan. 2022  from Roma Numismatics E-Sale No. 93, Lot 982. [Commemorates third liberalitas (gift or donation) by Hadrian to citizens of Rome, on anniversary of Rome’s founding.]

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Hadrian, AR Denarius, Rome Mint, AD 121 (late) - 123 (Group 3, see RIC II.3 p. 109). Obv. Laureate head right (no drapery, truncation with part of upper shoulder line viewed from behind), IMP CAESAR TRAIAN – HADRIANVS AVG / Rev. Oceanus with crab-claw horns, reclining left, leaning on dolphin (tail up) with head propped on left hand, holding up anchor with right hand, P M – TR P COS – III. 19 mm., 3.17 g. RIC II.3 520 (ill. Pl. 12) (2019 ed.) (“Scarce”), RSC II 1109, Sear RCV II 3518 (ill. p. 149) BMCRR III Hadrian 127. Purchased from Noonans (Noonans Mayfair Ltd., London, UK), Auction 269, 8 March 2023, Lot 628 [with old coin envelope, possibly from C.J. Martin, London UK].*

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*See BMCRR III, Hadrian Introduction, p. cxxxii: “Oceanus, picturesquely defined by claws on the head, dolphin and anchor at side, clearly marks the way of Hadrian to Britain.” (Hadrian traveled from Gaul to Britain in AD 122; see Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990), p. 109.) To the best of my knowledge, after searching OCRE, this type is the first of only three Roman Imperial coins to depict Oceanus. See John Melville Jones, A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins (London, Seaby, 1990), entry for “Oceanus” at p. 225: “In Greek and Roman mythology this was the name of the river which was believed to encircle the earth. He was represented in art in the form of a river god with added marine attributes. Oceanus is found on a denarius of Septimius Severus of AD 209, alluding to the emperor’s crossing to Britain, and on a medallion of Constans I (see Bononia).”

Hadrian, AR Denarius, Rome Mint, AD 126-127 [see RIC II.3 p. 132: Group 6]. Obv. Laureate head right with slight drapery on far shoulder, HADRIANVS – AVGVSTVS / Rev. Seven stars (septentriones)* within and above crescent moon (points of crescent upwards), COS III above. RIC II.3 852 (ill. Pl. 19) (2019 ed.), old RIC II 202 (1926 ed.), RSC II 466, BMCRE III Hadrian 464, Sear RCV II 3485. 18 mm., 3.18 g. Purchased from Noonans Auction 13-14 July 2022, Lot 949; ex Seaby (retail purchase 1979).

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*Referred to as such at RIC II.3 p. 853. The septentriones were the seven brightest stars within the Ursa Major constellation, forming an asterism currently known in the USA as the “Big Dipper,” and in the UK as the “Plough.” See https://oikofuge.com/septentrionate/;   https://www.britannica.com/place/Ursa-Major.

Hadrian, AR Denarius, Rome Mint AD 126-127 [see RIC II.3 p. 132: Group 6]. Obv. Laureate bust right with slight drapery on far shoulder, HADRIANVS – AVGVSTVS / Rev. Six-pointed star within crescent moon (points of crescent upwards), COS III above. RIC II.3 864 (ill. Pl. 20) (2019 ed.), old RIC II 200 (1926 ed.), RSC II 460, BMCRE III Hadrian 457, Sear RCV II 3484 (ill. p. 145). 18x19 mm., 3.27 g.  Purchased from cgb.fr, 13 May 2022.

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Now to the Travel Series/"Provinces Cycle," and related coins.

Hadrian AR Denarius [sometimes considered part of Travel Series], ca. 130 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 168: Group 9, “time of the visit to Egypt”), Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust left, with slight drapery on far (right) shoulder, HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P / Rev. Galley sailing left with four rowers, pilot facing left seated in shelter at stern, acrostolium* at prow, FELICTATI // AVGVSTI (in exergue).  RIC II.3 Hadrian 1401 & Pl. 28 (Head type A2) (2019 edition), old RIC 240 (1926 ed.), RSC II 713a, BMCRE III Hadrian 625, Foss 108a [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 18 mm., 3.26 g., 6 h. Purchased at Nomos Obolos Auction 22, 6 March 2022, Lot 602 (“Scarce issue with Hadrian facing to the left”).

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*See https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=Acrostolium: “An ornamental extension of the stem post on the prow of an ancient warship. Often used as a symbol of victory or of power at sea.” 

Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”). Obv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / Rev: AEGYPTOS, Egypt reclining left, holding sistrum in right hand and resting left arm on basket; to left, ibis standing right. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1482 & Pl. 30 (2019 edition), old RIC II 297d (1926 ed.), RSC II 99, Sear RCV II 3456, BMCRE III Hadrian 801-3, Foss 95 at p. 118 (dating Hadrian’s travels in Egypt to AD 130) [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 18 mm., 3.11 g., 7 hr. 

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bare head left, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Africa reclining left, leaning with left elbow on rock, wearing elephant-skin headdress, holding scorpion with extended right hand and cradling cornucopiae with left hand and arm, basket of grain-ears to left at her feet, AFRICA. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1497 & Pl. 31 (2019 edition) (see http://numismatics.org/ocre/id/ric.2_3(2).hdn.1497); old RIC II Hadrian 299 (1926 ed.) var. (head right), RSC II Hadrian 137, Sear RCV II 3459 obv. var. (laureate head left), BMCRE III Hadrian 821 var. (this type cited at BMCRE 821 fn. at p. 344); Foss 81 at p. 117 (dating Hadrian’s travels in the province of Africa to AD 128) [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 18 mm., 3.31 g. Purchased from Akropolis Ancient Coins, Jan. 2022.

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bareheaded and draped bust right, viewed from back or side, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Alexandria, draped, standing left, holding sistrum in extended right hand and basket in left hand with snake emerging from it and situla (water pail) hanging below*; ALEX-AN-DRIA. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1504 & Pl. 31 (2019 edition), old RIC II 300 (1926 ed.), RSC II 156, BMCRE III Hadrian 826, Foss 94a, Sear RCV II 3460 (obv. var.). Purchased from Dix Noonan Webb Auction 253, 13 March 2022, Lot 1408; ex B.A. Seaby Ltd. London, retail purchase 1990 (with coin envelope from Seaby).

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*See Strack (1933) at p. 164, stating that the round object beneath the basket is a situla, Isis' normal two-part water pail or container, hanging from her left wrist in the coin type: "am Handgelenk hängt das der Isis eigene zweiteilige Wassergefäss." It certainly makes sense that Alexandria would have some more of the attributes of Isis in Romano-Egyptian iconography -- just like "Aegyptos" -- given that she already holds a sistrum.

Wikipedia describes a situla as a bucket or pail, and specifically mentions it as an attribute of Isis. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Situla:

"The term is also used for pails carried by figures in other art forms; according to Plutarch and other sources this was a sign of a devotee of Isis, who herself is often shown carrying one (containing water from the sacred Nile), of a rather different shape, with a rounded bottom, and sometimes lidded. This rounded shape, often with a "nipple" at the bottom (see Luristan example in gallery), is believed to have represented the female breast.[14] These were also donated to temples as votive offerings by devotees."

Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bare head right, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Asia standing left, right foot on prow, holding reaping hook [or acrostolium*] with right hand, and rudder with left hand, A S I A. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1507 & Pl. 32 (2019 edition); old RIC II Hadrian 301 (1926 ed.), RSC II Hadrian 188 (ill. p. 114), Sear RCV II 3462 (ill. p. 143), BMCRE III Hadrian 829, Foss 57 at p. 116 (dating Hadrian’s travels in the Province of Asia to AD 123-125)  [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)] . 18.5 mm., 3.4 g. [Part of Hadrian’s Travel Series, commemorating his travel to the Asia Province -- located in northwest Anatolia, largely comprising the former kingdom of Lydia -- in 123 AD. See Edward A. Sydenham, Historical References on Coins of the Roman Empire (1968 ed.; orig. pub. 1917) at p. 96. But see https://followinghadrian.com/hadriantravels, placing Hadrian’s visit to Asia in 124 AD, including its capital Ephesus on 29 Aug. 124.] 

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*The new edition of RIC II (RIC II.3 1507) describes the object in Asia’s right hand as a “reaping hook.” The old RIC describes it as a “hook”; RSC as a hook or an acrostolium; Sear RCV as an “acrostolium(?),” with the rudder in her left hand called a steering-oar. Numiswiki defines an acrostolium as an “ornamental extension of the stem post on the prow of an ancient warship. Often used as a symbol of victory or of power at sea.” See https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=Acrostolium. I think it is impossible to tell from my example which it is, although it certainly does not look particularly “ornamental.”

Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cyle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 146]. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right with drapery covering cuirass, viewed from behind, right shoulder forward, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Germania standing facing with head right, holding spear in right hand and resting left hand on shield, GER – MANIA. RIC II.3 1525 (ill. Pl. 32) (2019 ed.), RSC II 806b, BMCRE III Hadrian 839, Strack 301, Sear RCV II 3496 (obv. bust var.). 17.5 mm., 3.15 g. Purchased from Gorny & Mosch Auction 289, 11 Oct. 2022, Lot 819.

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cyle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 147]. Obv.  Laureate head right, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Italia standing three-quarters left, holding sceptre in right hand and cornucopiae in left, ITA – LIA. RIC II.3 1540 (ill. Pl. 33) (2019 ed.); RSC II 869 (ill. p. 139); BMCRE III Hadrian 853 (ill. Pl. 63 no. 14), Sear RCV II 3499 (obv var. bare head). 17 mm., 2.76 g. Purchased from Noonans (Noonans Mayfair Ltd., London, UK), Auction 269, 8 March 2023, Lot 646; ex Spink & Son Ltd. (with old Spink coin envelope & coin tag stating price of 80 GBP).

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cyle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 148]. Obv. Bare-headed draped bust right, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Nilus, naked to waist, reclining right, resting right arm on urn[?] and holding cornucopiae in left hand; above Nilus’s feet, hippo standing left with head raised towards Nilus (mouth open, left ear visible), leaning against Nilus’s upraised left knee [or a rock?]; crocodile right in waters below; NILVS above.  RIC II.3 1547 (ill. Pl. 33) (2019 ed.); RSC II 990; BMCRE III Hadrian 860; Sear RCV II 3508 (ill. p. 148) (obv. var. laureate head). 18x19 mm., 3.30 g. Purchased from Noonans (Noonans Mayfair Ltd., London, UK), Auction 269, 8 March 2023, Lot 647; ex C.J. Martin Coins (London, UK) (purchased Dec. 1997) (see notation on old coin envelope accompanying coin).

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The hippo leaning against Nilus is a bit difficult to distinguish at first glance; here's a close-up:

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 150]. Obv. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Hadrian togate, standing left, holding volumen (scroll) in left hand; with his right hand, clasping right hand of Africa and about to raise her from her kneeling position, right; she wears elephant skin headdress and holds grain ears with her left hand; between them, two stalks of grain; RESTITUTORI – AFRICAE. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1569 & Pl. 34 (2019 edition); old RIC II Hadrian 322 (1926 ed.); RSC II Hadrian 1223a; BMCRE III Hadrian 871; Sear RCV II 3533; Foss 80 at p. 117 (dating Hadrian’s relevant trip to AD 128) [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. 17x19 mm., 3.41 g.  Purchased from Noonans Auction 13-14 July, 2022, Lot 988. 

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 130-133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 173: Group 10, “Provinces Cycle”) [136 AD according to Sear RCV II p. 150]. Obv. Laureate and draped bust right, viewed from behind, HADRIANVS – AVG COS III PP / Rev. Hadrian togate, standing left, holding volumen (scroll) in left hand; he clasps right hands with Hispania to raise her from her kneeling position, right, holding an olive branch over her left shoulder, with a rabbit crouching between them, right; RESTITVTORI – HISPANIAE. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1582 (at p. 180)  & Pl. 35 (2019 edition); old RIC II Hadrian 327 (1926 ed.); RSC II Hadrian 1260a (rev. ill. p. 152); BMCRE III Hadrian 890 [BM Collection 1939,0109.10]; Sear RCV II 3535 (obv. bust var., rev. ill. p. 150). 16.5 mm., 3.32 g., 6 h. Purchased from CNG (Classical Numismatic Group, LLC) Electronic Auction 525, 20 Oct. 2022, Lot 1140; ex. “Cloudsley Collection,” originally purchased at retail from Spink & Son, Ltd. (with old Spink ticket & envelope).

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Hadrian AR Denarius, Travel Series, Rome Mint, 133 AD (according to RIC II.3 p. 207: Group 11, “including Adventus to Rome of 133”) [134-138 AD according to Mattingly & Sydenham in old RIC II]. Obv. Bare head right, HADRIANVS - AVG COS III PP / Rev. Roma standing right in military dress, with right shoulder bare, holding inverted spear with left hand, receiving the arriving Emperor Hadrian standing left, togate, bearing a scroll in left hand, the two clasping their right hands, ADVE-NTVS AVG. RIC II.3 Hadrian 1984 & Pl. 35 (2019 edition), old RIC II Hadrian 225a (1926 ed.), RSC II Hadrian 84a, Sear RCV II 3455 (ill. p. 143), BMCRE III Hadrian 581. 18 mm., 3.46 g. [Part of or ancillary to Hadrian’s Travel Series, commemorating Hadrian’s arrival in Rome (adventus) at the end of his travels.]

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Impressive group of "Travel Series" coinage, the most complete group I remember seeing 🤩.

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