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Medieval: what have I bought now?!?


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My goodness - I'm pretty stupid myself. I only collect antique coins - I don't have any coins from the Middle Ages - and yet I've already bought another one...

It's just that when - for whatever reason - I see a coin that I like simply because of the way it's depicted, I can't keep my hands off it. But I have zero idea from that time and don't even know what I bought. I only liked the representation of the obverse and reverse. And then I made the dealer an offer, I thought he wouldn't accept it anyway - and now I have another medieval coin like that ūüėĄ¬†

What I know: Venice, probably Giovanni Gradenigo... ?!?

Help please ūüėȬ†...! @JeandAcre¬†... and all the other medieval experts. What can one roughly say about this coin? I don't want a detailed expert opinion - I would only be interested in a very rough idea of what this coin is. Thank you very much.

 

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3 minutes ago, JeandAcre said:

The only fun trivia to add, since ancients are your bailiwick, is that the denomination's name comes from the Roman solidus.

Yes and somehow they turned out very different. The Roman solidus was a solid gold coin, but by the time you get to C17 Europe, it's billon and you can often buy one for less than $5. The full transformation (humiliation?) can be seen in modern Vietnam, where you get 100 xu to the dong (the solidus became the French sou, which became the Vietnamese xu). A xu is worth USD0.00000042.

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Posted · Supporter

That is a really nice soldino.  Your Doge was part of a powerful Venetian family, which produced several Doges.  Giovanni Gradenigo was Doge #56 and took office in 1355.  Pietro Gradenigo (below) was Doge #49 and served from 1289-1311.  

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Thanks!¬†And again I have learned something. It's great that we can learn so many new things in general with our coins ūüôā¬†...

 

2 hours ago, Hrefn said:

That is a really nice soldino.  Your Doge was part of a powerful Venetian family, which produced several Doges.  Giovanni Gradenigo was Doge #56 and took office in 1355.  Pietro Gradenigo (below) was Doge #49 and served from 1289-1311.  

Wow... I love general the Gold Zecchino coins ... but your example is one of the best I ever seen. Fantastic! Gratulation!

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Posted · Supporter

Not a stupid purchase at all. You were smart enough to buy a very nice example. Most of these types are not rare but are more usually found in a worn condition. They were a solid commercial coin that received much use.

Italy, Venice. Doge Francesco Dandolo, AD 1329-1339. AR Soldino (16mm, 0.83g, 7h). Obv: +‚ÄĘFRA‚ÄĘDAN DVLO‚ÄĘDUX‚ÄĘ: Doge kneeling left, holding Banner. Rev: +‚ÄĘS‚ÄĘMARCVS‚ÄĘVENETI‚ÄĘ ; Lion of St. Mark, advancing left, holding Banner. Ref: CNI VII 31; Papadopoli 12; Paolucci 4; Biaggi 2810. About Fine, nice toning.

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From Wikipedia: "Several medieval¬†chronicles¬†narrate the¬†translatio, the removal of Saint Mark's body from¬†Alexandria¬†in Egypt by two Venetian merchants and its transfer to Venice in 828/829.[2]¬†The¬†Chronicon Venetum¬†further recounts that the¬†relics of Saint Mark¬†were initially placed in a corner tower of the¬†castrum, the fortified residence of the Doge and seat of government located on the site of the present¬†Doge's Palace.[3]¬†Doge¬†Giustiniano Participazio¬†(in office¬†827‚Äď829) subsequently stipulated in his will that his widow and his younger brother and successor¬†Giovanni¬†(in office¬†829‚Äď832) were to erect a church dedicated to Saint Mark wherein the relics would ultimately be housed. Giustiniano further specified that the new church was to be built between the¬†castrum¬†and the Church of Saint Theodore to the north. Construction of the new church may have actually been underway during Giustinian's lifetime and was completed by 836 when the relics of Saint Mark were transferred.[4]"

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Posted · Supporter

Nice coin ‚Äď and not a stupid purchase at all. In contrast to many other soldini, including mine below, your coin is in good shape and not clipped. It is from the time when la serenissima was the dominant mercantile force and naval power in the Mediterranean, adding additional interest.

MAItalienVenedigSoldinoGiovanniDolfin.png.42791bff20f8eedba087463d642b3cfe.png

Italy, Republic of Venice, under Giovanni Dolfin (57th Doge), AR soldino (slightly clipped), 1356-1361 AD. Obv: +IOh‚ÄôS DELPhYNO DVx; kneeling doge holding banner l., . Rev: + S MARCVS VENETI; lion of St. Marc with banner l.; in field l., S. 14mm, 0.43g. Ref: MEC12, 1164‚Äď1165.

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