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Hadrian Tetradrachm, Dattari 1438


Al Kowsky

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ROMAN  EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian, AD 117-138 (dated RY 22, AD 137/8). Billon Tetradrachm: 13.36 gm, 26 mm, 12 h. Obverse: Laureate bust of Hadrian facing right, slight drapery on left shoulder. Reverse: Nilus (god of the Nile River) reclining on the bank of the Nile River while holding a water reed in his left hand & cornucopia in his right hand; a crocodile is reclining next to him; in the left field is the date L KB. Dattari 1438; RPC III 6250; Emmett 879.22. Photo courtesy of Coin Archives/CNG.

I've always admired the reverse design on this coin type & was determined to find an acceptable example that wouldn't send me to the "poor house". This coin type is common but very popular, so nice looking examples rarely show-up at bargain prices. This coin was struck in the last year of Hadrian's reign when he was 62 years old. He is considered one of the "five good emperors" despite some of his actions & questionable activities 😏. Hadrian married Trajan's 18 year old grandniece Sabina, but their union was almost non existent & scandalous. Hadrian was more interested in young men & boys. Trajan's empress Plotina greatly admired Hadrian for his values & Hellenic culture, & with her persuasion Trajan chose him to be his successor. Hadrian was an excellent military leader & went on many of the military expeditions. He dressed like a soldier & ate the same food they did. When he became emperor he gave the entire military a sizeable raise. Late in his reign, Hadrian fell madly in love with a handsome youth from Bithynia, Antinous. Antinous was a companion of Hadrian during many of his extensive travels, but during their stay in Egypt Antinous mysteriously drowned in the Nile River. Hadrian was broken hearted & his health seriously declined after that event. Hadrian had Antinous deified & many bronze & marble sculptures were erected in his honor throughout the empire. Hadrian's reign remained relatively peaceful except for the the Second Roman-Jewish War, 132-136. According to Cassius Dio, 580,000 Jews perished in that rebellion led by Simon bar Kokhba, Roman casualties were heavy too, with an entire legion perishing. 

Website members are welcome to post their coins depicting Nilus or any other river god 😊.

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OK.

Type: AE Drachm, 32mm 24.42 grams Obverse: AVT KAI TPAI AAPIA CEB, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right Reverse: LDW (delta) EK in exergue, Nilos reclining left upon a crocodile, holding cornucopia and reed, Genius emerging from the cornucopia and pointing at letters IS in upper field Reference: Milne 1269

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Egypt, Alexandria. Hadrian, AD 117-138. BI Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.94g, 12h). Dated RY 19 (AD 134/5). Obv: ΑVΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ-ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СEΒ; Laureate head left. Rev: Bust of Nilus right, wearing taenia with lotus buds, slight drapery on far shoulder; cornucopia behind his right shoulder; L ЄN-NЄAKΔ (date) around. Ref: Köln 1147; Dattari (Savio) 7450-1; K&G 32.619; RPC III 5941; Emmett 875.19. Toned, light porosity. Good Very Fine. Ex Berk BBS 216 (27 July 2021), lot 579, purchased from Moneta, April 2011.  Ex CNG e529 (14 Dec 2022), Lot 570. 

image.jpeg.d4aa8ef74022e33ceebd37c2c34ef3fa.jpeg

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Another Hadrian Nilus

normal_Hadrian_8.jpg.811ef6932e6fea99d446f500bd48ae1d.jpg

Hadrian (AD 117-138).
AE drachm
Struck year 16 = 131/2 AD.
Obv.: AVT KAI TPAI AΔPIA CEB, laureate, draped bust of Hadrian right
Rev.: Nilus seated left on rocks, holding reed and cornucopia, crocodile below, LIϚ (year 16) in left field.
AE, 26.43g, 34mm
Ref.: Cologne 1056. Dattari-Savio pl. 87, 1794. Emmett 1016/16, KG 32.517

 

 

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8 hours ago, Edessa said:

Egypt, Alexandria. Hadrian, AD 117-138. BI Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.94g, 12h). Dated RY 19 (AD 134/5). Obv: ΑVΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ-ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СEΒ; Laureate head left. Rev: Bust of Nilus right, wearing taenia with lotus buds, slight drapery on far shoulder; cornucopia behind his right shoulder; L ЄN-NЄAKΔ (date) around. Ref: Köln 1147; Dattari (Savio) 7450-1; K&G 32.619; RPC III 5941; Emmett 875.19. Toned, light porosity. Good Very Fine. Ex Berk BBS 216 (27 July 2021), lot 579, purchased from Moneta, April 2011.  Ex CNG e529 (14 Dec 2022), Lot 570. 

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Edessa, What a lovely coin 😍! Both sides have impressive die engraving, the coin has perfect centering & great toning 😉.

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2 hours ago, shanxi said:

Another Hadrian Nilus

normal_Hadrian_8.jpg.811ef6932e6fea99d446f500bd48ae1d.jpg

Hadrian (AD 117-138).
AE drachm
Struck year 16 = 131/2 AD.
Obv.: AVT KAI TPAI AΔPIA CEB, laureate, draped bust of Hadrian right
Rev.: Nilus seated left on rocks, holding reed and cornucopia, crocodile below, LIϚ (year 16) in left field.
AE, 26.43g, 34mm
Ref.: Cologne 1056. Dattari-Savio pl. 87, 1794. Emmett 1016/16, KG 32.517

 

 

shanxi, I love the rich patina on this hefty drachm 😍! The Nilus side has wonderful detail too 😉.

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Wonderful coins, everyone! 

Here's a Hadrian Year 22 tetradrachm with Nilus and crocodile that's actually a different type from @Al Kowsky's terrific example, in that Nilus is technically "seated" rather than "reclining" on rocks. Mine has a poor obverse, but of course I bought it for the reverse:

image.jpeg.0038445a05944678d7ddc4f02c438a63.jpeg

And here's a Year 19 Hadrian tetradrachm with a bust of Nilus on the reverse:

image.jpeg.f82ea73808cb651932c4669f48ca21cd.jpeg

An obscure anonymous tessera from approximately the same time-period:

Anonymous, unpublished, AE[?] Tessera, 2nd Century AD[?], Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Crowned Bust of Nilus left, with cornucopiae behind and, in front, bust of Harpocrates [infant Horus], seen in profile, facing left, wearing skhent crown, with left arm and forefinger held up to mouth / Rev.  On left, Serpent Uraeus [sacred cobra, worn by deities and pharaohs] with female breasts and human head of Isis (as Isis-Thermouthis), crowned with solar disk and horns, standing facing, with coils enfolding sistrum upright to left*; on right, Osiris (mummiform) wearing Atef crown above horns, standing facing with arms crossed over chest holding crook and flail.** 15.60 mm., 2.52 g. Purchased from Naville Numismatics Auction 72 (27 Mar 2022), Lot 305; ex. “private British collection.” [Footnotes omitted.]

image.jpeg.37ce7aaea589762f4d6dc26eccaa6cdc.jpeg

A Claudius II Gothicus Year 2 tetradrachm; the reverse has jugate busts of Nilus and his consort Euthenia ( = the Roman Abundantia, unsurprisingly considered the bride of the Nile).

image.jpeg.a34432e674556a0114f37e36591fce92.jpeg

What could be a more appropriate companion for the Nile than the Danube? Here's a Trajan denarius with Danuvius on the reverse:

image.jpeg.bbee20e320497bf05b8b38c0a7e9f760.jpeg

Two other river gods, namely Orontes and Istros:

Trajan AR Tetradrachm, 112 AD, Seleucis & Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, club below to left and eagle (standing right) below to right, AYTOKP KAIC NER TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ΔAK / Rev. Tyche of Antioch, wearing mural crown, seated on rocks, right, holding two ears of wheat and a poppy-head in her right hand, river god Orontes at her feet in river swimming right, looking up at Tyche, left arm extended and left forefinger pointed, ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΙϚ ΥΠΑΤ Ϛ [= TR POT XVI, COS VI]. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 3543 (2015); RPC III Online 3543 at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/3543, McAlee 471 (ill. p. 205) (Group 6) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; Prieur 1499 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]; Sear GIC 1089 at p. 100 (ill.), attributed to Tyre [D. Sear, Greek Imperial Coins and their Values (1982)]. 25 mm., 13.88 g.

image.jpeg.3cf2bc22b88fe069565387fa12857375.jpeg

Anonymous civic issue, reign of Maximinus II, AE quarter follis [?][Sear] or 1/12 nummus [?][McAlee p. 106], Antioch Mint (3rd Officina), ca. 311-312 AD. Obv. Tyche (city-goddess of Antioch) wearing mural crown, seated facing on rock, holding wheat or  grain ears with right hand and, with left hand, holding a two-handled basket (filled with wheat or grain ears[?]) resting on ground to right, river god Orontes swimming below, GENIO ANTIOCHINI / Rev. Apollo standing left, pouring libation from patera held in right hand, and holding lyre in raised left hand, Γ [gamma, signifying 3rd Officina] in right field, APOLLONI SANCTO around; in exergue, SMA [meaning Sigmata Moneta Antioch (money struck at Antioch) or Sacra Moneta Antioch]. [Not in RIC; see http://www.notinric.lechstepniewski.info/6ant_civ_4v.html.] Sear RCV IV 14927 (ill); Vagi 2954; McAlee 170(c) (ill. p. 107); Van Heesch Type 3 [Van Heesch, J. "The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza (AD 312)" in Numismatic Chronicle (1993), pp. 63-75 & Pl. 11]; ERIC II, “Anonymous Religious Coinage of the Fourth Century,” pp. 1198-1199, No. 2. 16 mm., 1.35 g. [Struck either (1) to promote propaganda against Christians and aid in their persecution (and thus traditionally denominated the “Persecution issue”; or (2) as proposed by David Kalina, for use in festivals, including the Festival of Apollo at Daphne, held in conjunction with the Olympics in Antioch in 312 AD. See Kalina, David, “Anonymous Civic Coinage,” Series 1, at http://allcoinage.com/anonymous_civic.php.]

image.jpeg.ecdaa33d0932946bd1498134960b71aa.jpeg

Finally, my recent acquisition of a coin portraying the river-god Istros:

Septimius Severus, AE Tetrassarion, AD 201-203, Moesia Inferior, Nicopolis ad Istrum, struck for Emperor by Aurelius Gallus, legatus Augusti pro praetore. Obv. Laureate head right, AV • K • L • CEΠ – CEVHPOC • Π[ligate with E?] / Rev. River-god Istros, laureate, nude to hips, reclining right (from viewer’s perspective), head turned to right, holding with right hand a tree with four foliate twigs and resting left elbow on urn from which water flows, VΠA AVP ΓAΛΛOV NEIKOΠ; in exergue, ΠPOC IC. AMNG I/I 1310 [Pick, Behrendt, Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I  (Berlin, 1898) at p. 366 (ill. Pl. XVII nr. 34), available at  [https://archive.org/details/p1dieantikenmn01akaduoft/page/366/mode/2up?view=theater ]*;  HH&J 8.14.32.14 [Hristova, H., H.-J. Hoeft, & G. Jekov, The Coins of Moesia Inferior 1st - 3rd c. AD: Nicopolis ad Istrum (Blagoevgrad, 2015)]; Varbanov (Eng.) Vol. I, 2642 [Ivan Varbanov, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior (English Edition) (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005)] (var. legends). Possible die match to examples sold by Künker in April 2017 (see https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3782272 ) and  posted by Jochen1 at Forvm Ancient coins in March 2006 (see https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=26898.msg175825#msg175825 ). 27 mm., 17.54 g., 1 h. Purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, LLC (CNG) E-Auction 531, Jan. 25, 2023, Lot 478; from the Dr. Michael Slavin Collection of River-God Coins, previous purchase “PB 12/18/99” according to accompanying coin envelope. [Footnotes omitted.]

image.jpeg.af777151f9691310579deefb486302a2.jpeg

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4 hours ago, DonnaML said:

Wonderful coins, everyone! 

Here's a Hadrian Year 22 tetradrachm with Nilus and crocodile that's actually a different type from @Al Kowsky's terrific example, in that Nilus is technically "seated" rather than "reclining" on rocks. Mine has a poor obverse, but of course I bought it for the reverse:

image.jpeg.0038445a05944678d7ddc4f02c438a63.jpeg

And here's a Year 19 Hadrian tetradrachm with a bust of Nilus on the reverse:

image.jpeg.f82ea73808cb651932c4669f48ca21cd.jpeg

An obscure anonymous tessera from approximately the same time-period:

Anonymous, unpublished, AE[?] Tessera, 2nd Century AD[?], Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Crowned Bust of Nilus left, with cornucopiae behind and, in front, bust of Harpocrates [infant Horus], seen in profile, facing left, wearing skhent crown, with left arm and forefinger held up to mouth / Rev.  On left, Serpent Uraeus [sacred cobra, worn by deities and pharaohs] with female breasts and human head of Isis (as Isis-Thermouthis), crowned with solar disk and horns, standing facing, with coils enfolding sistrum upright to left*; on right, Osiris (mummiform) wearing Atef crown above horns, standing facing with arms crossed over chest holding crook and flail.** 15.60 mm., 2.52 g. Purchased from Naville Numismatics Auction 72 (27 Mar 2022), Lot 305; ex. “private British collection.” [Footnotes omitted.]

image.jpeg.37ce7aaea589762f4d6dc26eccaa6cdc.jpeg

A Claudius II Gothicus Year 2 tetradrachm; the reverse has jugate busts of Nilus and his consort Euthenia ( = the Roman Abundantia, unsurprisingly considered the bride of the Nile).

image.jpeg.a34432e674556a0114f37e36591fce92.jpeg

What could be a more appropriate companion for the Nile than the Danube? Here's a Trajan denarius with Danuvius on the reverse:

image.jpeg.bbee20e320497bf05b8b38c0a7e9f760.jpeg

Two other river gods, namely Orontes and Istros:

Trajan AR Tetradrachm, 112 AD, Seleucis & Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, club below to left and eagle (standing right) below to right, AYTOKP KAIC NER TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ΔAK / Rev. Tyche of Antioch, wearing mural crown, seated on rocks, right, holding two ears of wheat and a poppy-head in her right hand, river god Orontes at her feet in river swimming right, looking up at Tyche, left arm extended and left forefinger pointed, ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΙϚ ΥΠΑΤ Ϛ [= TR POT XVI, COS VI]. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. III 3543 (2015); RPC III Online 3543 at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/3543, McAlee 471 (ill. p. 205) (Group 6) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; Prieur 1499 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]; Sear GIC 1089 at p. 100 (ill.), attributed to Tyre [D. Sear, Greek Imperial Coins and their Values (1982)]. 25 mm., 13.88 g.

image.jpeg.3cf2bc22b88fe069565387fa12857375.jpeg

Anonymous civic issue, reign of Maximinus II, AE quarter follis [?][Sear] or 1/12 nummus [?][McAlee p. 106], Antioch Mint (3rd Officina), ca. 311-312 AD. Obv. Tyche (city-goddess of Antioch) wearing mural crown, seated facing on rock, holding wheat or  grain ears with right hand and, with left hand, holding a two-handled basket (filled with wheat or grain ears[?]) resting on ground to right, river god Orontes swimming below, GENIO ANTIOCHINI / Rev. Apollo standing left, pouring libation from patera held in right hand, and holding lyre in raised left hand, Γ [gamma, signifying 3rd Officina] in right field, APOLLONI SANCTO around; in exergue, SMA [meaning Sigmata Moneta Antioch (money struck at Antioch) or Sacra Moneta Antioch]. [Not in RIC; see http://www.notinric.lechstepniewski.info/6ant_civ_4v.html.] Sear RCV IV 14927 (ill); Vagi 2954; McAlee 170(c) (ill. p. 107); Van Heesch Type 3 [Van Heesch, J. "The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza (AD 312)" in Numismatic Chronicle (1993), pp. 63-75 & Pl. 11]; ERIC II, “Anonymous Religious Coinage of the Fourth Century,” pp. 1198-1199, No. 2. 16 mm., 1.35 g. [Struck either (1) to promote propaganda against Christians and aid in their persecution (and thus traditionally denominated the “Persecution issue”; or (2) as proposed by David Kalina, for use in festivals, including the Festival of Apollo at Daphne, held in conjunction with the Olympics in Antioch in 312 AD. See Kalina, David, “Anonymous Civic Coinage,” Series 1, at http://allcoinage.com/anonymous_civic.php.]

image.jpeg.ecdaa33d0932946bd1498134960b71aa.jpeg

Finally, my recent acquisition of a coin portraying the river-god Istros:

Septimius Severus, AE Tetrassarion, AD 201-203, Moesia Inferior, Nicopolis ad Istrum, struck for Emperor by Aurelius Gallus, legatus Augusti pro praetore. Obv. Laureate head right, AV • K • L • CEΠ – CEVHPOC • Π[ligate with E?] / Rev. River-god Istros, laureate, nude to hips, reclining right (from viewer’s perspective), head turned to right, holding with right hand a tree with four foliate twigs and resting left elbow on urn from which water flows, VΠA AVP ΓAΛΛOV NEIKOΠ; in exergue, ΠPOC IC. AMNG I/I 1310 [Pick, Behrendt, Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I  (Berlin, 1898) at p. 366 (ill. Pl. XVII nr. 34), available at  [https://archive.org/details/p1dieantikenmn01akaduoft/page/366/mode/2up?view=theater ]*;  HH&J 8.14.32.14 [Hristova, H., H.-J. Hoeft, & G. Jekov, The Coins of Moesia Inferior 1st - 3rd c. AD: Nicopolis ad Istrum (Blagoevgrad, 2015)]; Varbanov (Eng.) Vol. I, 2642 [Ivan Varbanov, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior (English Edition) (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005)] (var. legends). Possible die match to examples sold by Künker in April 2017 (see https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3782272 ) and  posted by Jochen1 at Forvm Ancient coins in March 2006 (see https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=26898.msg175825#msg175825 ). 27 mm., 17.54 g., 1 h. Purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, LLC (CNG) E-Auction 531, Jan. 25, 2023, Lot 478; from the Dr. Michael Slavin Collection of River-God Coins, previous purchase “PB 12/18/99” according to accompanying coin envelope. [Footnotes omitted.]

image.jpeg.af777151f9691310579deefb486302a2.jpeg

Donna, Thanks for posting this impressive group of river gods 😲! My favorite is the Severus bronze 😍.

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3 minutes ago, Alegandron said:

Nope, not Nilus... It's the guy with the funky face, who is supposed to be the God over all the rivers in the world...

Sicily Gela AR Litra Horse-Achelous 0.63g 13mm 465-450 BCE HGC 2 p 373.JPG 
Sicily Gela AR Litra Horse-Achelous 0.63g 13mm 465-450 BCE HGC 2 p 373

Great example of archaic period engraving on a tiny coin 🤩!

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