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I am selling a gold coin for 900 Euros soon (a little under $1000.00). I want to start an ancients collection. I have not the slightest idea where to start. I know that I don't want just a few expensive ones, as I wan't to learn about many and various eras as well as just looking at and holding them.

Suggestions would be very welcome regarding a good selection to start with, trusted sellers and the availability of delivery to Spain.

Over to you knowledgeable members, I look forward to having some interesting things to research as per your answers. Of course, this does not negate the adage "collect what appeals to you", but your experience would be invaluable to someone starting from new.

Many thanks in advance

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...i'd reckon late Roman republic/early imperial would be as good as place to start as any...then move backward, forward and outward to other cultures 

 

L. Rubrius Dossenus denarius, c87BC laureate Jupiter Bust right with scepter behind obverse, lighting bolt in triumphal quadriga, with victory holding wreath  flying over reverse. 18mm, 3.40gms

IMG_0624.JPG

IMG_0626.JPG

Edited by ominus1
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Thankyou. I am going to compile a running list of advice subjects to hopefully reach a consensus. Already I am struggling. The obverse you posted is self explanatory, the reverse description however is, to me, baffling. Plenty of research and studying images will get me to recognise which bit is Victory and where the lightning bolt is. Sorry for newbie ignorance

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24 minutes ago, ominus1 said:

...i'd reckon late Roman republic/early imperial would be as good as place to start as any...then move backward, forward and outward to other cultures 

 

L. Rubrius Dossenus denarius, c87BC laureate Jupiter Bust right with scepter behind obverse, lighting bolt in triumphal quadriga, with victory holding wreath  flying over reverse. 18mm, 3.40gms

IMG_0624.JPG

IMG_0626.JPG

I like this idea. I think most either start in LRBs (Late Roman Bronzes) due to affordability. Or trying to collect the twelve Caesars Suetonius mentions. 

I wish I had the foresight to start in Roman Republic and Greek (Sicily in particular).

 Here's some reasons why:

IMG_0273.PNG.62a6af3dc2dfd128286875eb26283922.PNG1571400_1607291685.l-removebg-preview.png.1fd559dff4bb761f2fe4f1a4bb2cf665.png2217834_1632778050.l-removebg-preview.png.343d283ebc0010880b6141a1d8f148b9.png021279_l-removebg-preview.png.43e5e8e6ffc4e8be53c06b440ebeb461.png2610239-removebg-preview.png.5c7d42f2bd4356dbd4bff00b6cdd68d2.png

And Sicily is famous for having the most artistically beautiful coins of the ancient world:

image00054.thumb.jpg.789db8cc94b4db06812cdd741eb55658.jpgIMG_0751(1).PNG.a18d39683067f955b253a1072d954a6c.PNG2058211_1626462233.l-removebg-preview.png.297e3cb1e5584b2a26446bdb074ebb03.pngIMG_0240.PNG.e1b9f20cbb824fe8e77b95100b53f3fe.PNGScreenshot_20220508-132424_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.907da001daba6337d801cad4ed258e91.png

 

My best advice though, is to look at lots of ancient coins and see what speaks to you. Is it all about the history? If so you can save a lot of money buying worn coins. Which have their own appeal. There really is magic in holding coins that have been passed around and used in commerce. . Or are you drawn to the pretty coins? Not easy to save on many of those. 

What do you like?

 

*Edit-Ps, and stay the #♡€& away from Macedonian shield coins! (He screamed with love in his voice)

Edited by Ryro
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I started collecting not long ago myself.

In terms of trusted sellers who can ship to Spain, I advise you to check out ma-shops. Most of those dealers are based in Europe. There is also VCoins, though most of their dealers are in the US (though most should still ship). Auctions tends to be cheaper, but you need to know the coins you're bidding on or you'll overpay.

In terms of starting a collection, the only guarantee I have is what you start out collecting is not what you'll collect a few years from now. Therefore, just start learning about the different coins from different historical periods. One nice thing about collecting ancients vs modern is that 100 people can build completely different collections. Everyone's in a different area and you need to find what interests you the most.

Personally, I focus on the time of Philip II, Alexander the Great, and the Era of the Diadochi. Therefore, I recommend that you don't collect those coins because I already have enough bidders to compete with. 🙂 

After you've done a bit of research, select a few coins you want to target and buy them. They don't need to have anything in common - just what you find interesting. Over time, you'll find yourself drawn to one or more areas of ancients over others.

Note that there are several auction houses in Spain. I've never ordered from them because I've read of shipping issues to the US, but since you're in Spain you may have no issues.

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30 minutes ago, Ryro said:

I like this idea. I think most either start in LRBs (Late Roman Bronzes) due to affordability. Or trying to collect the twelve Caesars Suetonius mentions. 

I wish I had the foresight to start in Roman Republic and Greek (Sicily in particular).

 Here's some reasons why:

IMG_0273.PNG.62a6af3dc2dfd128286875eb26283922.PNG1571400_1607291685.l-removebg-preview.png.1fd559dff4bb761f2fe4f1a4bb2cf665.png2217834_1632778050.l-removebg-preview.png.343d283ebc0010880b6141a1d8f148b9.png021279_l-removebg-preview.png.43e5e8e6ffc4e8be53c06b440ebeb461.png2610239-removebg-preview.png.5c7d42f2bd4356dbd4bff00b6cdd68d2.png

And Sicily is famous for having the most artistically beautiful coins of the ancient world:

image00054.thumb.jpg.789db8cc94b4db06812cdd741eb55658.jpgIMG_0751(1).PNG.a18d39683067f955b253a1072d954a6c.PNG2058211_1626462233.l-removebg-preview.png.297e3cb1e5584b2a26446bdb074ebb03.pngIMG_0240.PNG.e1b9f20cbb824fe8e77b95100b53f3fe.PNGScreenshot_20220508-132424_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.907da001daba6337d801cad4ed258e91.png

 

My best advice though, is to look at lots of ancient coins and see what speaks to you. Is it all about the history? If so you can save a lot of money buying worn coins. Which have their own appeal. There really is magic in holding coins that have been passed around and used in commerce. . Or are you drawn to the pretty coins? Not easy to save on many of those. 

What do you like?

 

*Edit-Ps, and stay the #♡€& away from Macedonian shield coins! (He screamed with love in his voice)

Those are beautiful. When I have decided, and I am thinking of 3 different periods, I would like to split it between good honest fairly worn pieces and a few with a bit if meat still in the details.

All of this, so far, is great for a newbie.

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If you are interested in Roman Imperial I highly suggest the Nerva Antonine Dynasty. It was the height of the empire and has some interesting emperors with historical reverses at a much lower cost than the 12 Caesar’s.

I also tend prefer silver over bronze even though the larger bronze flans lead to more space for some beautiful artistry. I would suggest doing a lot of homework and practice recognizing tooling on higher value bronze purchases if that is your preference.

Some Nerva Antonines:

B2E5D90A-5A96-4ED5-A6AC-DD3EE18E0966.thumb.jpeg.d7c780fc5266ebabf1cf029dd4389f2c.jpeg
 

As for Greek... go with your gut!

Edited by Curtisimo
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I'm a beginning collector myself, and I fully understand how overwhelming it can feel! I enjoy history from all periods, and I own a wide range of coins from ancient Greek to Late Roman Empire with everything in between. I own a handful of ancient Chinese coins as well. Byzantine is still on my list to get. 

My advice would be, don't try to settle down and collect just one type, or one time period, etc., at least not yet. Buy whatever appeals to you - whether it be for the history, artistry, or both! Find interest in coins you've never thought much about (such as Chinese coins for me) and buy a few examples. Eventually, you'll likely settle down and develop some specialized interest, but now is the time to expand your knowledge and experience!

Early Roman Empire is a good place to start (albeit a little more pricey) since most people are familiar with the names/places (Augustus, Caligula, Nero, et al.). Also, the letters on the coins will be familiar even if one doesn't know Latin.

Greek coins are also full of history and artistic beauty. Of course, many of them will be a little pricey too, although good deals can be had. 

Late Roman coins can be had for less than the price of a fast-food meal. To me, they aren't as artistically pleasing (some notable exceptions, of course) but there is still a ton of history and fun in collecting them.

 

Probably your biggest advantage in starting your collection is being a member of this forum! There is a wealth of great info here and tons of great people who are always willing to share their knowledge with new guys. (Speaking from experience here. 🙂 ) 

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First of all, congratulations for starting this journey. There is a big chance you will be very happy with the outcome.

I first saw an ancient coin in hand in 2015 I think, when I bought some very worn LRBs from a numismatic show. Although the price was pleasant (I was under the impression that any ancient coin is expensive - not 4 digits but I was pleased to buy coins for 2-3 EUR. I thought it was a fantastic deal back then, it wasn't in fact 😄 )

I didn't like them too much and in October 2020 I was bored and thought what to do next with my collection, as my modern coins and notes collection was almost complete, for my standards and goals. So I decided to start studying ancients, knowing it's difficult, expensive (not as expected, but not peanuts money for a man who isn't rich). But VERY rewarding.

Here are my first ever purchase from auctions. A lot of 34 coins (described erroneously as "Roman Bronze coins" - there were a few silver coins and a Campania, Neapolis)

image.png.f620a91698cb044b2ecfe7dd18469dfc.png

Same auction - a lot of 8 denarii

image.png.6c8ed5a34121f408c3db5ab2c4c29ef8.png

image.png.d6c6994086a4da8d6f8a85f839b79694.png

And a lot of 4 denarii (in fact, 3 denarii and an antoninianus)

image.png.989fe64241224f9ae664cf067dbdca09.png

This was my start in this journey. I think they were cheap (the auction was not popular) and suddenly I had a base for my collection.

It was extremely educational to identify all the coins myself (like you, I had zero knowledge back them). I recognized a Trajan portrait from the big lot and I was able to read some names on the better coins from the silver lots. So I started researching, finding auction sites, comparing prices, realizing what coins suit my tastes.

A month later I was browsing an auction and saw a coin  liked very much.

image.png.091af7ff9af3f9289c5823cec2b3e3f5.png

I was not aware there are reverses with animals (and studying further I found various reverses I liked a lot). Won this one and was extremely happy.

I still consider myself a beginner (I have 1 year and a half of experience with this area). So there is still much to learn. The number of ancient coins is enormous and this is an advantage - as you have a huge number to choose from - depending on what you want to collect - Roman imperial coins? perhaps concentrating on a ruler/dynasty/period? Provincial coins? Greek? Other cultures?

There are some collectors who specialize on a niche - I will not nominate them because I am sure they can offer you advice - but I learned myself from colleagues who specialize on dynasties; or certain coin types (Macedonian shields :p); Roman Republican types - probably the most elaborate designs from antiquity; or other cultures, such as Parthian coins.

You are starting so I am going to tell you what I did in my first months - I was browsing auctions coin by coin and when a coin looked appealing, I tried reading about it. Who is that guy Antoninus Pius? how was him as an emperor? what is that reverse, is it a deity, what is that object he/she is holding. What is the city for this Provincial coin? does it still exist? who lived there? et caetera.

Of course I tried to inform myself about an estimate price and decide if I am comfortable with it and if I want to bid on the coin.

Few things in my life were as pleasant as winning a coin I was waiting for weeks, and especially when I won them with a good price.

A few months later I started looking at the Greek and Republican sections in auctions (for me they were discouraging initially) and when I liked a coin, I tried to win it. And on many occasions I won.

My collection is not as impressive as some collections owned by forum colleagues, but I am proud and I rarely have 2 days without browsing my album.

I did not find a certain niche to specialize in. When I buy a new coin, usually it's:

- a coin with a pleasant design for me - animals, mythological scenes ...

- Imperial coins from rulers I like - Trajan, Vespasian, Titus (to name just a few)

- Imperial coins from rulers missing from my collection - when I find one that is appealing and cheap, I tried to add a new name

- Republican coins, as it is an area i try to learn more about.

 

I wish you good luck and happy collecting.

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7 hours ago, ambr0zie said:

First of all, congratulations for starting this journey. There is a big chance you will be very happy with the outcome.

I first saw an ancient coin in hand in 2015 I think, when I bought some very worn LRBs from a numismatic show. Although the price was pleasant (I was under the impression that any ancient coin is expensive - not 4 digits but I was pleased to buy coins for 2-3 EUR. I thought it was a fantastic deal back then, it wasn't in fact 😄 )

I didn't like them too much and in October 2020 I was bored and thought what to do next with my collection, as my modern coins and notes collection was almost complete, for my standards and goals. So I decided to start studying ancients, knowing it's difficult, expensive (not as expected, but not peanuts money for a man who isn't rich). But VERY rewarding.

Here are my first ever purchase from auctions. A lot of 34 coins (described erroneously as "Roman Bronze coins" - there were a few silver coins and a Campania, Neapolis)

image.png.f620a91698cb044b2ecfe7dd18469dfc.png

Same auction - a lot of 8 denarii

image.png.6c8ed5a34121f408c3db5ab2c4c29ef8.png

image.png.d6c6994086a4da8d6f8a85f839b79694.png

And a lot of 4 denarii (in fact, 3 denarii and an antoninianus)

image.png.989fe64241224f9ae664cf067dbdca09.png

This was my start in this journey. I think they were cheap (the auction was not popular) and suddenly I had a base for my collection.

It was extremely educational to identify all the coins myself (like you, I had zero knowledge back them). I recognized a Trajan portrait from the big lot and I was able to read some names on the better coins from the silver lots. So I started researching, finding auction sites, comparing prices, realizing what coins suit my tastes.

A month later I was browsing an auction and saw a coin  liked very much.

image.png.091af7ff9af3f9289c5823cec2b3e3f5.png

I was not aware there are reverses with animals (and studying further I found various reverses I liked a lot). Won this one and was extremely happy.

I still consider myself a beginner (I have 1 year and a half of experience with this area). So there is still much to learn. The number of ancient coins is enormous and this is an advantage - as you have a huge number to choose from - depending on what you want to collect - Roman imperial coins? perhaps concentrating on a ruler/dynasty/period? Provincial coins? Greek? Other cultures?

There are some collectors who specialize on a niche - I will not nominate them because I am sure they can offer you advice - but I learned myself from colleagues who specialize on dynasties; or certain coin types (Macedonian shields :p); Roman Republican types - probably the most elaborate designs from antiquity; or other cultures, such as Parthian coins.

You are starting so I am going to tell you what I did in my first months - I was browsing auctions coin by coin and when a coin looked appealing, I tried reading about it. Who is that guy Antoninus Pius? how was him as an emperor? what is that reverse, is it a deity, what is that object he/she is holding. What is the city for this Provincial coin? does it still exist? who lived there? et caetera.

Of course I tried to inform myself about an estimate price and decide if I am comfortable with it and if I want to bid on the coin.

Few things in my life were as pleasant as winning a coin I was waiting for weeks, and especially when I won them with a good price.

A few months later I started looking at the Greek and Republican sections in auctions (for me they were discouraging initially) and when I liked a coin, I tried to win it. And on many occasions I won.

My collection is not as impressive as some collections owned by forum colleagues, but I am proud and I rarely have 2 days without browsing my album.

I did not find a certain niche to specialize in. When I buy a new coin, usually it's:

- a coin with a pleasant design for me - animals, mythological scenes ...

- Imperial coins from rulers I like - Trajan, Vespasian, Titus (to name just a few)

- Imperial coins from rulers missing from my collection - when I find one that is appealing and cheap, I tried to add a new name

- Republican coins, as it is an area i try to learn more about.

 

I wish you good luck and happy collecting.

Thank you for giving me some insight (as all who have answered here have done). I think the idea of first obtaining a bulk lot so as to study them in hand is a good one. Actually holding that historical artifact would mean more to me than it's condition, also would give me something physical to try to attribute to it's period, city, personage etc. It all sounds so fascinating but at the same time so daunting. I am looking forward to starting, like life it is going to be a journey, not a destination.

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NumisForvms separated our posts into a number of categories so you could start with one coin from each.  I believe they should have had a separate category of Roman Provincial and you could eliminate modern world leaving a starter set of:

Greek

g10086fd3393b.thumb.jpg.cbd3749bd825db53d895a7aee365757c.jpg

Roman Imperial (my add)

pa1190fd1381.thumb.jpg.59710198d0e49fd94eb41139bf5e0c9c.jpg

Roman Republican

r10810rp0634.thumb.jpg.2e067538a5da83766fe12eea0c32b44f.jpg

Roman Imperial

rb1110bb0142.thumb.jpg.47b6de92abeb40d75f8d0c17b92aacd0.jpg

Byzantine

rz0405fd3398.thumb.jpg.00cb421f5fda4f35222c6cc8eb307e0b.jpg

Medieval

v00595bb3265.thumb.jpg.89a63e82b1884187a7f6362522c27b60.jpg

Non-Western

op0076nt3477.thumb.jpg.501bb14d12098fc42f8c89d4bf793126.jpg

Of course we could add more categories (Far Eastern, Silk Road, Islamic and several more) and each could be broken into sections if you want more variety.  Greek, for example, could be Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic.  You also might choose to have a silver and a bronze from each.  That takes us back to the fact that it IS your collection so you should buy coins that appeal to you.  If you find absolutely no appeal in one of my suggested areas, just skip it. 

I am not providing ID information on my sample coins and I (don't) do that for a reason.  I am not opposed to helping people with numismatic education but I prefer the old 'teach them to fish' option.  If you want to know details about the coin I posted, you are quite free to research them as samples of the thousands of ancient coins available in each category.  Copying catalog numbers and cut/paste Wikipedia does less good.  That is just my opinion.  I do have a few (over a hundred) web pages on the subject which all are invited to visit.  There you might just find the answers I did not give here.   Just don't ask "What is it worth?"  We have dealers that will be happy to guide your spending.  I am not a dealer.  On my website, nothing is for sale. 

https://www.forumancientcoins.com/dougsmith/

Enjoy the hobby.  

 

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I really have no idea what strikes your fancy?  There have been a lot of good suggestions here.

Sestertii of the Julio-Claudians are huge and impressive, but pricey; a decent one would be $400-600, and that range would only snatch a problem Caligula.

I rather like the posthumous Alexander and Lysimachus Tetradrachms of around 200-170BC.  They're large (32-35mm.), and while pricey in high grade, aren't THAT expensive for a fine or some Very Fine ones.

Oh, and per Spain, there are at least two or three Spanish vcoins dealers.  I'm not sure what the rules are sending coins to Spain.

Edited by Nerosmyfavorite68
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This is on the assumption that it's not a nightmare to send to Spain:  My favorites are: (in no order)

Forum Ancient coins (U.S.)

Incitatus Coins (canada)

Marc Breitsprecher (US)

London Ancient Coins (UK)

Dr. Busso Peus (Germany)

 

However, since you're in the EU, I'm guessing that it's easier for EU countries to send to each other?  So perhaps you could trawl around vcoins for the EU dealers?

 

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So you're looking into getting into ancient coin collecting?  Welcome!  In a way, I consider myself a good person to answer you because I am relatively new to ancients collecting myself--but I have a lot of experience with Canadian decimal coinage.  That experience has taught me a number of things. Where to start?  Perhaps I'll just go with a random list of points:

  • don't commit too much money to purchases at this stage.  Read, look at pictures, talk to people, reflect on your own interests.  My story: I was teaching an academic writing textbook nearly twenty years ago. In it, each chapter began with a photograph of something with writing on it.  One chapter began with a picture of an Athenian Tetradrachm with the three letters A - TH - E (short for "Of the Athenians").  I fell in love right then, and knew I had to own one.  But it was more than 15 years until I could part with enough cash to buy one (my avatar). At this point, that's likely to be a once-in-a-lifetime purchase for me, unless the heavens open and rain gold down around me!  It's also my highest-grade coin, too.  Most of my coins cost only a fraction of that one.
  • the old adage "buy the book before the coin" has great insight.  Nowadays, you don't necessarily need to buy a book, but I recommend not spending any very serious money until you have acquired some knowledge not only of coins, but also of how the market works.  At the most basic level, you don't want to buy fakes on eBay, for example.  Without knowledge, you may not know how to spot such fakes.  Your best option right now is to stick to reputable dealers, like those on Ma-shops or VCoins. Most offer a lifetime guarantee of authenticity. so it is usually safe to buy from them.
  • notwithstanding the fact that so much knowledge is available on the internet, I would encourage you to build a small numismatic library.  I don't mean spending thousands of dollars on obscure books you will never read.  No: for now, just buy a few basic introductions to the field, whether that be Greek, Roman, Greek and Roman, or whatever.  I can recommend a few titles if you're interested, but that might be better as another post on its own.  At the beginning, just two or three books will go a long, long way to providing you with essential knowledge that you will need to enjoy your hobby and also to make good purchases.
  • don't assume what you are doing is an investment.  Too many people do, and then become extremely upset when their treasures end up being bought by dealers at anywhere from 10% to 50% of what they paid for them (even without inflation being factored in!).  Many people try, but very few people make money in numismatics. No: buy what you want because you like it, because you want to learn something from it, because it brings you joy.  Don't buy thinking you are going to make money because you almost certainly won't.
  • when you are buying, if you are thinking of resale value, beware of coins with significant flaws.  Of course, few ancient coins are going to be perfect, but some things will really stand out.  Unusual scratches, for example.  Porous surfaces are another thing you need to be very cognizant of.  A coin with good eye appeal, but which has bad surfaces, will eventually degrade over time.  The resale value of that coin will be less than it would be otherwise.  On the other hand, perhaps that's the only way you can afford to pick up a particular design or piece!  So that kind of thing works both ways.  Mostly, such problems present a liability, but on occasion, they can produce an opportunity.  Just be aware of them.
  • grade isn't everything.  Of course we'd all love to find affordable hoards of MS70's!  But ancient coins as a field doesn't work that way.  Coins are rarely (compared to moderns, anyway), in mint state, for one thing.  If you can get a high-grade coin for a good price, and you like it, that's great.  But a well-worn coin can still have grace, eye appeal, and a very real charm of its own!  Your hard-earned dollars will go much farther if you downgrade (if you'll pardon the pun) your expectations from mint state to something like "Fine" or "Very Fine."
  • go for eye appeal.  Even exempting all the really dirt-cheap ancient coins out there, there are so many ugly ancient coins, and we all have them.  But try to avoid them unless it's unavoidable.  You don't need to spend a fortune to get good design, executed well.  Late Roman Bronze (LRB's) are an excellent case in point, as many cost less than a fast food meal, as has already been pointed out here.  But this principle holds true for Greek coins, too.  Seleukid coins are particularly affordable.  A coin is more likely to speak to you if it is beautiful, even in a worn state. Let's say you can buy a particular kind of coin for as little as 5 Euros.  Let's say it's a common coin, meaning that you could easily find a coin with more detail, nicer surfaces, that sort of thing.  Maybe paying just 5 Euros more will get you a significantly better coin.  Go for that one, not the first one!  Or maybe you need to spend 40 Euros to get a really lovely example.  That might be worth it.  It might not.  But in general: avoid very cheap, ugly coins.
  • it is received wisdom amongst many collectors that one should specialize in order to have a coin collection.  I completely disagree.  If you want to specialize: good for you! But if you don't, also, still, good for you!  Perhaps you are more interested in building a collection that showcases the diversity of ancient coinage rather than a collection of only one narrower area.  One of these approaches is not better than the other for each person.  You're the collector, so you get to make that call.
  • The same goes for slabbed vs. unslabbed coins.  There is a lot of fundamentalism within the hobby over this very issue.  I'm more pragmatic: if you want your coins slabbed, then great. And if you don't, then also great.  You are collecting coins for you, not for others. That said, 99% of the affordable ancient coins will not be slabbed (even if one wanted to, it would not be cost-effective for most)
  • try to figure out what motivates you as a person.  Is it the love of the designs themselves?  Is it about art history?  Or are you more into military or political history?  Are you attracted to one geographical area (e.g. Spain) over another (e.g. Thrace)?  Or are you interested in coins that have some connection with literature?  Whatever the case is, put your money where your interest is.
  • The basic sub-fields of ancient collecting are:
    • Greek 
    • Roman Republic
    • Roman Imperial
    • Roman Provincial (formerly often called "Greek Imperial")
    • Byzantine
  • many collectors write off the Greek category out of modestly ("I'll never understand that field!"), or because of price.  While Greek coins are pricier, in general, it is possible to buy many nice Greek coins at 30 Euros each.  I would encourage you to consider this field.  If you like it, great.  If not, well, there are many more fields to choose from! But don't pre-eliminate it.
  • there is often better value to be found in the Roman Provincial category than in the Roman Imperial one.  Roman provincials can be extremely affordable.  You might get a nice, decent Augustus for 30 Euros, for example.  

I'll conclude with a couple of "postcard" type images of one Seleukid Greek coin, and one Roman Provincial coin. Neither one broke the bank!

image.jpeg.0a77c392792d8a880ab1fa8b04a25c29.jpeg

image.jpeg.1c35c0394295a24e99df82fe1bb64c76.jpeg

 

Well, good luck in your collecting.

Edited by NathanB
Just a few touch-ups for pricing and wording.
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One more suggestion:  Don't buy anything that you do not want.  This might seem obvious but too many of us buy coins because someone else told us that we needed to buy that type or that grade or we needed to buy something now and that is all we could find.  At least start out a little bit fond of the coins you buy.  Sure you will change your mind and decide to resell some or even trade with friends but I really wish I had never bought the coins I bought just because I did not have one or because I drove to the show and did not want to return empty handed.  I have coins that I really liked when I bought them nearly 60 years ago and still do but there are others that I regretted before I got home from a show or the package arrived in the mail.  If you doubt you want that coin, think about it.  My favorite coins took only milliseconds to convince me I wanted them.  They spoke my language and said, "Please."

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On 6/3/2022 at 9:50 AM, expat said:

I want to start an ancients collection. I have not the slightest idea where to start. I know that I don't want just a few expensive ones, as I wan't to learn about many and various eras as well as just looking at and holding them.

Take a look at my page for beginners:

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/

There are many linked pages designed for people like you, including one entitled "What should I collect?" 

Welcome to the hobby!  I've been at it seriously for 50 years and still find it fascinating!

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I don't want to replicate the excellent advice posted, except to say follow your passion!  What interests you

Take your time, read, study what appeals to you, be that historical, artistic or a combination of the two.

Being informed is the first step in beginning your journey into ancient numismatics.

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6 hours ago, dougsmit said:

One more suggestion:  Don't buy anything that you do not want.  This might seem obvious but too many of us buy coins because someone else told us that we needed to buy that type or that grade or we needed to buy something now and that is all we could find.  At least start out a little bit fond of the coins you buy.  Sure you will change your mind and decide to resell some or even trade with friends but I really wish I had never bought the coins I bought just because I did not have one or because I drove to the show and did not want to return empty handed.  I have coins that I really liked when I bought them nearly 60 years ago and still do but there are others that I regretted before I got home from a show or the package arrived in the mail.  If you doubt you want that coin, think about it.  My favorite coins took only milliseconds to convince me I wanted them.  They spoke my language and said, "Please."

This is a fantastic advice. And I followed the same idea since I started. Nothing compares to browsing an album and liking all the coins, each of them having an importance for you. Historically, thematically, aesthetically.

This is why some rare emperors are missing from my collection (or some rare-ish Greek coins for example). They tell nothing to me and I see no reason to pay, for example, 200 EUR on a coin when I could spend this sum for 4 coins that are more common, or more worn, but they have their story for me.

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Thanks to everyone for some sound and practical things to ponder.

I am only interested in coins that say" put me in your collection" because I like the look of it. I also want to start an ancients collection because it is something I have never before given any thought to. I have a large World coins collection with over 700 from Norway alone. Germany accounts for over 300 pieces from 1763 conventionthaler up to 1990's silver commems. It is never going to be considered an investment as, like all my others they will be for my enjoyment only. What my kids do with them after I have gone does not bother me in the slightest. I am enjoying some research and am going to start slowly. The counterfeit thing worries me a bit as I have no knowledge but before I commit to something I plan to post an image here and see what the response is. 

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On 6/5/2022 at 6:30 PM, expat said:

Hi, I live in Roquetas de Mar in the province of Almeria.

Ah ok I'm about six and a half hours north in Amposta...I lived in Nerja for a few years before moving up here..

There are at least 3 vcoin dealers in Spain that I buy from regularly 2 of which are very close to where you live....But in general if you buy within the EU you'll receive the coin within 5 days...

Paul

 

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23 minutes ago, Spaniard said:

Ah ok I'm about six and a half hours north in Amposta...I lived in Nerja for a few years before moving up here..

There are at least 3 vcoin dealers in Spain that I buy from regularly 2 of which are very close to where you live....But in general if you buy within the EU you'll receive the coin within 5 days...

Paul

 

Thank you. We often drive up to Nerja to purchase items for our gift shop.

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