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A rare reverse for Herennius Etruscus


Tejas
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I found the coin below on Ebay. It is an Antoninian of Herennius Etruscus, with the rare VICTORIA GERMANICA reverse.

Obv.: IMP C Q HER ETR MES DECIO AVG

Rev.: VICTORIA GERMANICA 

In May 251  Herennius Etruscus was elevated to the rank of Augustus by his father Trajan Decius. In the summer of 251 (June to August) Trajan Decius and his son were killed in the battle of Abrittus against the Goths. Hence, the coin can be dated to a few months between May and August 251. The time between May 251, i.e. the elevation to Augustus and the start of the fateful campaign against the Goths in June 251 leaves very little time for a significant victory over the Germanic people. 

I think there are two possible explanations: 

  1. The celebratory issue refers to the victory at Nicopolis ad Istrum in 250, against the Goths. Although the Goths were linguistically and culturally Germans, i.e. Germanic people, the Romans distinguished on the basis of geography between Goths at the lower Danube and Germans (Franci and Alamanni) at the upper Danube and Rhine. The reference on this coin may be an example of a departure from that practice, maybe the name Goths was not yet well established in the Roman public perception to be used on a coin. The first appearance of the name Goths on Roman coins came only some 20 years later unter Claudius II.
  2. The celebratory issue refers to an earlier victory over Germanic tribes at upper Danube or Rhine. The victory may have been quite insignificant to go unnoticed in the written sources, but may have been envoked at the start of the Gothic campaign to boost confidence. However, it would have been much easier and relevant to refer to the significant victory over the Goths at Nicopolis in the previous year for this purpose. So I think, option one is preferable. If correct, this is quite significant for historiography.

In any case, the issue was likely shortlived and small, as these coins are quite rare today. The coin below is not just distinguished by its rare reverse, it is also one of the best preserved examples of that type.

Show us coins related to the events of AD 250/251, which arguably marked a turning point in the history of the Roman empire.

Bild2.PNG

Edited by Tejas
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3 hours ago, Tejas said:

I found the coin below on Ebay. It is an Antoninian of Herennius Etruscus, with the rare VICTORIA GERMANICA reverse.

Obv.: IMP C Q HER ETR MES DECIO AVG

Rev.: VICTORIA GERMANICA 

In May 251  Herennius Etruscus was elevated to the rank of Augustus by his father Trajan Decius. In the summer of 251 (June to August) Trajan Decius and his son were killed in the battle of Abrittus against the Goths. Hence, the coin can be dated to a few months between May and August 251. The time between May 251, i.e. the elevation to Augustus and the start of the fateful campaign against the Goths in June 251 leaves very little time for a significant victory over the Germanic people. 

I think there are two possible explanations: 

  1. The celebratory issue refers to the victory at Nicopolis ad Istrum in 250, against the Goths. Although the Goths were linguistically and culturally Germans, i.e. Germanic people, the Romans distinguished on the basis of geography between Goths at the lower Danube and Germans (Franci and Alamanni) at the upper Danube and Rhine. The reference on this coin may be an example of a departure from that practice, maybe the name Goths was not yet well established in the Roman public perception to be used on a coin. The first appearance of the name Goths on Roman coins came only some 20 years later unter Claudius II.
  2. The celebratory issue refers to an earlier victory over Germanic tribes at upper Danube or Rhine. The victory may have been quite insignificant to go unnoticed in the written sources, but may have been envoked at the start of the Gothic campaign to boost confidence. However, it would have been much easier and relevant to refer to the significant victory over the Goths at Nicopolis in the previous year for this purpose. So I think, option one is preferable. If correct, this is quite significant for historiography.

In any case, the issue was likely shortlived and small, as these coins are quite rare today. The coin below is not just distinguished by its rare reverse, it is also one of the best preserved examples of that type.

Show us coins related to the events of AD 250/251, which arguably marked a turning point in the history of the Roman empire.

Bild2.PNG

Dirk, Nice score 😊! In AD 250 Decius placed his teenage son Herennius Etruscus in charge of the army fighting the Goths, while Decius confronted Philip I. Decius later joined his son on the Danubian front. The troops under the command of Trebonianus Gallus were also fighting the Goths with little success. Decius & Etruscus were finally ambushed by the Goths in the summer of AD 251. Pictured below is my only example of Etruscus on a tetradrachm struck at Antioch.

1449049381_NGC5746814-014AlKowskyCollection.jpg.be34975d9ff1ab99dba8d3a56ed1d796.jpg

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My only coin of the boy:

[IMG]
Herennius Etruscus as Caesar, AD 249-251.
Roman AR antoninianus, 3.83 g, 22.4 mm, 11 h.
Rome, 5th emission, early AD 151.
Obv: Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, radiate and draped bust, right.
Rev: PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Apollo seated left, holding branch and resting left elbow on lyre.
Refs: RIC 146; RSC 24a; Cohen --; RCV 9522; Hunter 9; ERIC II 40.

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Here is another recent acquisition of mine. My one and only Antoninian of Hostilian, the brother of Herennius Etruscus. 

Obv.: C VALENS HOSTIL MES QVINTVS N C

Rev. MARTI PROPVGNATORI 

Hostilian was too young to participate in the campaign against the Goths, which cost his father Trajan Decius and his brother Herennius Etruscus their lives. The Senate recognized him has successor and elevated him to the rank of Augustus, which Trebonianus Gallus, the actual successor of Trajan Decius seem to have accepted, probably to avoid civil war. However, Hostilian died in November 251, reportedly of the plague, but Zosimus suggests that he was assassinated.

The coin is slightly off center, but I like the charming portrait of Hostilian, who may have been 15 or 16 years old at the time.

22.PNG

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Here my best one from both of them,

Herennius Etruscus :

e.jpg.05180da6b156753f25c1469c8aa9b024.jpg

Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C

bust rad.,dra. r.

PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS

Herennivs stg. l. holding wand and transverse spear

Antoninianus, 4.19 gr, 20.21 mm, Rome

 

A.D.250 – 251, RIC IVc 147 p. 139

 

 

Hostillianus :

h.jpg.9fc3842715f92f41cce8684007e35025.jpg

C VALENS HOSTIL MES QVINTUS N C

bust rad., dra r.

MARTI PROPVGNATORI

Mars advancing r. holding spear and shield

Antoninianus, 3.46 gr, 20.97 mm, Rome

A.D.251, RIC IVc 177 p. 144

 

 

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Another from Antioch

normal_Herennius_Etruscus_01.jpg.5b691b6d730708fa45ab0d3f65ef7f30.jpg

Herennius Etruscus
Syria, Antioch
Billon tetradrachm
Obv.: ЄPENNЄ TPOY MЄ KY Δ ЄKIOC KЄCAP, draped and cuirassed bust right,
Rev.: ΔHMAPX ЄΞOYCIAC, eagle standing on palm-branch, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak, S C below
Ref.: Prieur 634
Billon, 12.19g, 25.9mm

 

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Excellent acquisition @Tejas, you apparently have an eye for rarities

Here are antoniniani of the two boys

753f91883c594eb4895d186b9e655f2d.jpg

Herennius Etruscus, Antoninianus - Rome, AD 250-251
Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, Radiate bust of Herennius right
PIETAS AVGVSTORVM, Sacrificial implements
4.45 gr
Ref : RIC # 143, Cohen #14, RCV # 9521

 

9605274bc34f4572ab1f3b15886352a1.jpg

Hostilian, Antoninianus - Rome mint, AD 251. Issued as Caesar with Trajan Decius
C VALENS HOSTIL MES QUINTVS N C, radiate and draped bust right
MARTI PROPUGNATORI, Mars advancing right, holding spear and shield
2.74 gr
Ref : RCV # 9556, Cohen # 15, RIC # 177b

Q

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Rare Sestertius of Hostilian as Augustus:

981212703_Bildschirmfoto2019-02-14um13_05_00.jpg.3f3ddcb9339b45372e1767b1e2e6c870.jpg

IMP CAE C VAL HOS MES QVINTVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Hostilian right
SECVRITAS AVGG S C - Securitas standing facing, looking right, her legs crossed, placing right hand on head and resting left arm on column.
14,69 gr / 28,37 mm
Sestertius, Rome June-August 251
RIC (Decius) 225; Hunter p. 254, 3 and plate 81; Cohen 60; Sear 9593

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Sestertius of Herennius Etruscus:

2101223939_Bildschirmfoto2022-03-15um19_10_32.png.6887ad93d0a7296a6fd7f035741ce80e.png

Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C - Draped bust of Herennius Etruscus right
PIETAS AVGG S C - Mercury standing left, holding purse in right hand, caduceus in left
Sestertius, Rome (1st officina), 3rd emission of Trajan Decius, spring 250-mid 251 AD
28mm / 15.72 g,
RIC IV 167a corr. (draped) (R 2); Cohen 12, Banti 1

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I have a number of Trajan Decius Antoniniani. They used to be really cheap in the 1990s. At least that is my impression. But this one is a more recent acquisition.

Obv: IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG
Rev: ADVENTVS AVG

RIC 11b.

Measurements: 3.91 g., 22 mm.

 

5496.png

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And now here are two tetradrachms of the two boys

ca967af32ca94fd78425b2942fcc1469.jpg

Herennius Etruscus, Cesar (249-251) - Tetradrachme de billon de l'atelier d'Antioche, 247 - 7° officine 

ЄPЄNN ЄTPOY MЄ KY ΔЄKIOC KЄCAP Buste drapé à droite vu par l'arriere. Z sous le buste
ΔHMAPX ЄΞOYCIAC Aigle à gauche, les ailes déployées, tenant une couronne dans son bec et une palme dans ses serres. A l'exergue SC

28 mm, 10.24 g, 7 h
Ref : Prieur #640, McAlee #1153g, RPC vol IX # 1773

 

5cd8fed4ad88484e8ef248b192457a9c.jpg

Hostilien, Cesar (250-251) - Tetradrachme de billon de l'atelier d'Antioche, 251 - 2° officine 

Γ OYAΛ OCTIΛIAN MЄ KYINTOC KЄCAP  Buste drapé à droite vu par l'avant. Deux points sous le buste
ΔHMAPX ЄΞOYCIAC Aigle à droite, les ailes déployées, tenant une couronne dans son bec et une palme dans ses serres. A l'exergue SC

26 mm - 11,34 g - 6h
Ref : Prieur #648, McAlee #1159b, RPC IX 1718#3 (cet exemplaire)


Q

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