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Antioch in Pisidia, large coins


Valentinian
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I have written a web page on the large-denomination Roman coins (provincial sestertii) from Antioch in Pisidia.

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/AntiochPisidia/AntiochPisidia.html

Here is one of the coins on that page:

GordianIII5AntiochinPisidia22109.jpeg.a9f5289a8a4714cc3f4ad4127d4a21cd.jpeg

Gordian III, 238-244
35-34 mm. 27.24 grams, (Sestertii of Gordian III are typically 31-29 mm and 21 grams or less.)
This coin is larger than imperial sestertii.
Bust right, laureate, cuirassed, and draped. 
IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG
CAES ANTIOCH COL  (Caesarea Antioch Colonia)
SR in exergue
Pietas standing left holding out patera over an altar, with incense box in her left hand, three standards on the left with the leftmost one surmounted by Victory.

RPC 2726  (The main reference is Roman Provincial Coinage, abbreviated "RPC", volume 7.1, which is on-line here.)

For more about the city and its coinage, again, see the page:
http://augustuscoins.com/ed/AntiochPisidia/AntiochPisidia.html

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3 hours ago, Valentinian said:

I have written a web page on the large-denomination Roman coins (provincial sestertii) from Antioch in Pisidia.

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/AntiochPisidia/AntiochPisidia.html

Here is one of the coins on that page:

GordianIII5AntiochinPisidia22109.jpeg.a9f5289a8a4714cc3f4ad4127d4a21cd.jpeg

Gordian III, 238-244
35-34 mm. 27.24 grams, (Sestertii of Gordian III are typically 31-29 mm and 21 grams or less.)
This coin is larger than imperial sestertii.
Bust right, laureate, cuirassed, and draped. 
IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG
CAES ANTIOCH COL  (Caesarea Antioch Colonia)
SR in exergue
Pietas standing left holding out patera over an altar, with incense box in her left hand, three standards on the left with the leftmost one surmounted by Victory.

RPC 2726  (The main reference is Roman Provincial Coinage, abbreviated "RPC", volume 7.1, which is on-line here.)

For more about the city and its coinage, again, see the page:
http://augustuscoins.com/ed/AntiochPisidia/AntiochPisidia.html

Thanks for sharing your well written & informative webpage ☺️! I've posted my hefty Gordians before but will post again for your thread.

892807365_GordianIIIAntiochia-PisidiaAlKowskyColl.(2).jpg.24e96c64a3985b2b024e7ff09328dab9.jpg

The composition on my other Gordian differs from the coin posted on your website, the engraver didn't add the fig tree 😮. I took the liberty of posting your coin below mine for comparison 😉.

249443103_GordianIIICAESANTIOCHCOL.jpg.4e2c5c361c669f209ab903d6de38a93b.jpg                                                   720333591_GordianIII5PisidiaAntiochiWolf85127ValentinianCollection.jpg.c27f54a9944ba149e9b1246bbb0d9265.jpg

 

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image.png.979ab034b55b8f070ab8768f058b2962.png

 

Marcus Antonius Gordianus III, Antiochia ad Pisidiam, Galatia, 238-244 AD, AE Bronze, Diameter 35.00mm, Weight 24.50g, RPC VII.2 2742, Krzyżanowska XXII/96, XXIV/98, Obv. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III, right, seen from rear / IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, Rev. Victory advancing right, holding trophy in both hands / VICTORIA DOMINI ANTI COL[ONI] S R, Ex Pars Coins San Jose, Auction 30, Lot 270

 

I have two others more - but I dont like they so much. This is my best example... 

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I should have posted this comparison with my first entry but didn't think of it at the time 🤔Roma Numismatics Ltd. sold a Gordian that appears to be a double-die match to my coin at their E-Sale 95, lot 725, it fetched $390.00 including the buyers premium. In their description they say "Extremely Rare; among the very finest of very few to come to auction in the past twenty years." I certainly have to question that 😏. What do Numis Formuns members think 🤨?

2127216877_GordianIIISNGFrance1211comparisons.jpg.496e9b46963be106c6124b3ec5580116.jpg

https://www.romanumismatics.com/259-lot-725-gordian-iii-a-34mm-of-antioch-pisidia?auction_id=159&view=lot_detail

 

 

 

Edited by Al Kowsky
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Gordie seems to get an unfair number of these, with Septimius coming second.  Here's a Sev Alex I recently picked up, and to which I just discovered @dougsmit has an obverse die match. He likes it (well, and so do I now) because of the R completing the legend under the bust, not exactly best practice when it comes to lettering.

image.png.63a40a7fcdecb6ee16da566e8f0f2880.png

The latest example I have from the city (last issue?) is Claudius II:

image.jpeg.272fa3c80b856f9c297e0c9c1ab7ec9a.jpeg

... but it's a smaller coin like the one of Volusian that @Valentinian illustrates at the bottom of his new page.

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Informative web page, @Valentinian! These issues are interesting. Here's a big Gordy with a reverse type that hasn't yet been posted!

[IMG]
Gordian III, AD 238-244.
Roman Provincial Æ 35 mm, 26.72 g, 6 h.
Pisidia, Antioch, AD 238-244.
Obv: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III, r., seen from rear.
Rev: COL CAES ANTIOCH, S-R, Mên standing r., wearing Phrygian cap, foot on bucranium, holding sceptre and Victory (standing r., on globe, holding trophy), resting elbow on column; behind his shoulders, crescent; to l., rooster standing, l.
Refs: RPC VII.2, 2724; Krzyżanowska XXII/94; BMC xix.187, 70.
 
 
Edited by Roman Collector
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Antioch in Pisidia is probably one of the more prolific mints in the Roman Empire possibly bein Victory flying rightg the fourth after Rome Alexandria and Antioch on the Orontes. The city struck coins in both the  first and second centuries however it is the third where the coinage becomes quite large and extensive. Circa 205 AD Septimius Severus commenced striking a series of large sestertii sized coins one of which is this coin. 

Septimius Severus Ae 30 205-211 AD Obv Head right laureate Rv Victory flying right holding trophy in both hands  Krzyzanovska XXXI/41 22,62 grms 30 mm Photo by W. Hansen1017872625_pisidantseptsev5.jpg.6753bc31191704486e15960dd9e98379.jpg

Until the completion of RPC, Krzyzanovska's book Monnaies coloniales d' Antioch de Pisidie remains the principal source. Being that it was published in Warsaw in 1970 it is not the easiest book to find. Also the plates can leave a lot to be desired. The "sestertius" denomination started with Septimius circa 205 AD. and consisted of coins minted for himself Julia Domna Caracalla and Geta. The date of 205 is based on the portraits of Caracalla. He is depicted as a younger clean shaven individual an image which could be seen on contemporary Rome mint coins. The letters S R have caused a lot of speculation over the years with no one appearing to come up with a satisfactory explanation for their presence.  I believe that it may stand for some version of Sestertius Romana but when I presented this idea in a lecture it did not elicit much response. 

  @Severus Alexander noted the disproportionate numbers of Gordian III. This is true. At one time when I was researching this mint, I looked through not only one line sources but the various SNG"s that were available at the time to me. I cannot say that this research was comprehensive but my findings were that over half the coins recorded from this mint were struck during the reign of Gordian III. In fact there is a curious group of coins from this mint that are related to the large sestertii issue of Gordian. There is a series from the mint with the head of Gordian III but with a radiate crown, They are about half the size of the "sestertii" so they are likely to be dupondii. These coins are usually given to Philip II .However it is much more likely that they were struck for Philip I. 

 After the reign of Gordian III, The large 'sestertii' were discontinued until the reign of Gallienus. They make a brief appearance during his reign. Otherwise the 'dupondius' is seen being struck until the reign of Claudius Gothicus 

Edited by kapphnwn
additional info Hey I am still on holidays
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Septimius also used the Men type.

pi0880bb2247.jpg.d48e87536546bba011296e61b29e950a.jpg

Here Gordian used a sacrifice scene with standards on an AE35.  My example makes the identity of the reverse figure less than obvious but the seller called it 'emperor'.    I prefer the Pietas as listed by Valentinian.

po2140bb0860.jpg.4fd1695440958b3a555a1b76823938d1.jpg

Edited by dougsmit
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Of all Antioch, Pisidia coins, my favorite is the smaller, left facing denomination just for what I consider interesting style. pi0870b00313lg.jpg.749c877064bb6b6895b87a1061c7c038.jpg

I also like the smaller AE26 Domna with Men but consider my Fortuna coin for Domna rather pedestrian in style. 

pk1150bb1250.jpg.696f7c2d9217371180d0edb2c572e19e.jpgpk1140bb0056.jpg.d43c999547f827daa1e2ad0dbf069ad5.jpg

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Here's a Caracalla large coin from Antioch in Pisidia that I got a few years ago:

spacer.png

Ruler: Caracalla (Augustus)
Region, City: Pisidia, Antioch
Coin: Bronze AE33
IMP CAE M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate bust right
COL CAES ANTIOCH - she-wolf standing right below tree, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus
Exergue: SR
Mint: (ca 198-217 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.19g / 33mm / 7h
References:
  • Krzyzanowska pl. 39, 70
  • SNG France 1141-1143
  • BMC 46
Acquisition:

Roma Numismatics Online Auction E-Sale 21 #522 31-Oct-2015

 

ATB,
Aidan.

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My rarest and historically coolest Pisidian Antioch is this one.  Issued c. 210-211, just before Caracalla murdered Geta, it shows the brothers shaking hands on the reverse, with the legend CONCORD AVGVSTOR COL ANTIOCH S-R.  Not so much Concordia there, actually! 🙃

image.jpeg.a837e1f8b210e1bec59c820d7007ea6b.jpeg

 

That's a cool idea for the meaning of SR, @kapphnwn, but I don't think it can refer to "sestertius" because "SR" also on the dupondius-sized pieces (see my Claudius II above).  My bet is that it refers to the senate, and is sort of analogous to the meaning of S C on imperial AE.  You're surely right that the two denominations correspond to sestertius and dupondius, respectively, though.  The many examples of Gordian III that survive may be due to the hoarding of AE that took place in the mid-third century.  According to Kenneth Harl, around a fifth of the hoards from the 3rd century are of this type, basically exclusively sestertii.  Due to the extreme debasement of the antoninianus in the 250s and 260s, the AE metal was becoming worth keeping!  (I should check his book to see if provincials were being hoarded too... something rings a bell about that.)

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And here's a pre-Septimius example from the mint, issued under Marcus Aurelius.  I found the bust of Mên intriguing:

image.jpeg.10927dbcd916498be8bd94c9bd49feb0.jpeg

Marcus Aurelius, 161-180. 'As' (24mm, 7.10g). Obv: ANTONINVS AVGV; Laureate head of Marcus Aurelius to right. Rev: COLO ANTIOC; Head of Mên, wearing Phrygian cap, set to left on crescent. Krzyżanowska 141. RPC IV.3 online 7356

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