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Theodosius I AE Decargyrus


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Hello all,

I recently purchased this piece at a budget auction house. This coin is a common one and was minted from 383-388 at Nicomedia, Anatolia. What makes this coin interesting to me is that most AE-2's(decargryii) weigh between 4 and 5.5 grams, however this piece is a heafty 6.48 grams! 

Another point of intrest is that most of us collectors tend to refer to the large size bronze coins from 378-395 as AE-2's, however the Theodosian Code likley gives us the name of the denomination.

Theodosian Code 9.23.2:  “We command that only the centenionalis nummus shall be handled in public use and that the larger money shall be abolished. No person, therefore, shall dare to exchange the decargyrus nummus for another, and he shall know that the aforesaid money, which can be seized if found in public use, will be vindicated to the fisc.”

Please post your Decargyrii coins!

 

 

 

 

 

3340010_1665045210.jpg

Edited by Magnus Maximus
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And ruling in the west alongside Theodosius I in the east was Gratian, for whom the eastern mints also struck coins alongside those of their emperor:

[IMG]
Gratian, AD 367-383.
Roman Æ 2 (maiorina; decargyrus), 5.90 g, 21.4 mm, 11 h.
Constantinople, AD 383.
Obv: D N GRATIA-NVS P F AVG, helmeted, draped and cuirassed bust, right, holding spear and shield.
Rev: GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Emperor standing facing, head right, on ship, raising right hand. Victory seated at helm. No wreath in field; in exergue, CONΓ.
Refs: RIC 52a (unlisted officina).

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Very nice coins posted so far. 

Here are more coins of the denomination, that I own.

Arcadius. A.D. 383-408. Æ   Reference:  Condition: Very Fine   Weight: 4.72gr Di...

Arcadius. A.D. 383-395

Condition: Very Fine

Weight: 4.72g

Diameter: 22mm

3174281_1660667590.jpg

Honorius. A.D. 393-395

Condition: Very Fine

Weight: 3.94g Diameter: 20mm

 

Edited by Magnus Maximus
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Cool thread!  I only have 2 or three of this denomination, none photographed.  Ones a worn Magnus Maximus and the other a corroded Alexandria Theodosius, both obtained very early on.

Any idea what the slightly earlier AE1 was called?

Why were the larger coins demonetized?  One suspects it has to do with inflation, but why keep the tiniest denomination?

I would also suspect that some of these circulated beyond 395.  Many of these coins are found quite worn.

 

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The term "Decargyrus"  is new for me, interesting.

normal_Aelia_Flacilla_1.jpg.cbc213cab9f1ef3c656e86bd2b55cc99.jpg

Aelia Flacilla
Syria, Antiochia, AE2
Obv.: AEL FLACCILLA AVG , Draped bust right
Rev.: SALVS REI PVBLICAE Aelia Flacilla standing facing head right, ANTE
Ae, 5.55g, 21.7mm
Ref.: RIC.62 pl. 14/17

 

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7 hours ago, Valentinian said:

For a list of all the types and their emperors, see the RIC IX site:

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/ricix/

Scroll down a bit to see the reverse types and click on the images to see more about each.

Here is one example of Type 20 on that site. 

Theodosius2GLORIAROMANORVMgalley96234b.jpeg.9471d7ff66576df85660fe6a7d7593ae.jpeg

Ouuuh! That’s a nice colorization with Patina and the Coin. Nice. Like this coin.

👍

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11 hours ago, Nerosmyfavorite68 said:

Any idea what the slightly earlier AE1 was called?

Why were the larger coins demonetized?  One suspects it has to do with inflation, but why keep the tiniest denomination?

I would also suspect that some of these circulated beyond 395.  Many of these coins are found quite worn.

 

I’m not sure what the official name for the large AE-1 that Julian II began is during was called. Kenneth W Harl, in his book “Coinage and the Roman Economy, states that the AE-1 was a billon coin and it’s demonetization in 367/8 allowed the Emperors Valentinian I and Valens to increase the silver purity of the siliqua. 
 

0344EB76-80F2-4C1B-ADFC-6B2692956CF9.png

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