Jump to content

Coins I’ve won from my first online auction


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Earlier this week, I decided to participate in my first online coin auction on Biddr. Before this I’ve purchased most of my coins via retail channels such as Vcoins, dealer websites (Minotaur Coins, Akropolis Coins, Davissons etc), Reddit, eBay, & Facebook groups.

The Biddr auction I chose to participate in was hosted by Eid Mar Auctions, a newer dealer. Since one of my main focuses are Roman Republic coinage, I placed most of my bids on denarii. The dealer charges 15% buyers premium & free shipping on lots over 200 Euros.

I won three lots, including a budget denarius of Pompey:

877CE1EC-C41F-4D7A-9E23-5EAB6AFB996B.jpeg.935cf7edc31b03ee046613df0485787f.jpeg
Sextus Pompey, 42-40 BC. AR denarius (17 mm. 3,3 g.). Uncertain mint in Italy. MAG PIVS IMP ITER, bare head of Pompey Magnus right, capis behind head, lituus before. Banker's countermark IV. Rev. Neptune standing left, foot on prow, holding aplustre, between the Catanaean brothers Anapias and Amphinomus walking in opposite directions and carrying their parents on their shoulders. PRAEF (partly ligate) above, CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C (partly ligate) in two lines in exergue. Crawford 511/3a; CRI 334; BMCRR Sicily 7-10; RBW 1785.

IMG_4758.jpeg.3c4c1a5154afee63f052091c33234397.jpeg

L Procilius Denarius, 80 BC. AR Denarius (17,3 mm. 3,8 g.). Rome. S C behind laureate head of Jupiter right. Rev. L PROCILI F, Juno Sospita walking right, wielding spear, shield on left arm, coiled serpent at foot right. Crawford 379/1; Sydenham 771; Procilia 1; Sear 306.

IMG_4803.jpeg.9cd06374df8121ad021eec49de7e4c0d.jpeg

L Rustius, 74 BC. AR Denarius (19 mm. 3,7 g.). Rome. Helmeted head of Mars right. SC behind head, X beneath chin. Rev. Ram standing right, L RVSTI in exergue. Crawford 389/1; Sydenham 782; Rustia 1; Sear 320.

 

Edited by MrMonkeySwag96
  • Like 22
  • Clap 3
  • Heart Eyes 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
Posted · Benefactor
2 hours ago, MrMonkeySwag96 said:

Earlier this week, I decided to participate in my first online coin auction on Biddr. Before this I’ve purchased most of my coins via retail channels such as Vcoins, dealer websites (Minotaur Coins, Akropolis Coins etc), Reddit, eBay, & Facebook groups.

The Biddr auction I chose to participate in is hosted by Eid Mar Auctions, a newer dealer. Since one of my main focuses are Roman Republic coinage, I placed most of my bids on denarii. The dealer charges 15% buyers premium & free shipping on lots over 200 Euros.

I won three lots, including a budget denarius of Pompey:

877CE1EC-C41F-4D7A-9E23-5EAB6AFB996B.jpeg.935cf7edc31b03ee046613df0485787f.jpeg
Sextus Pompey, 42-40 BC. AR denarius (17 mm. 3,3 g.). Uncertain mint in Italy. MAG PIVS IMP ITER, bare head of Pompey Magnus right, capis behind head, lituus before. Banker's countermark IV. Rev. Neptune standing left, foot on prow, holding aplustre, between the Catanaean brothers Anapias and Amphinomus walking in opposite directions and carrying their parents on their shoulders. PRAEF (partly ligate) above, CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C (partly ligate) in two lines in exergue. Crawford 511/3a; CRI 334; BMCRR Sicily 7-10; RBW 1785.

IMG_4758.jpeg.3c4c1a5154afee63f052091c33234397.jpeg

L Procilius Denarius, 80 BC. AR Denarius (17,3 mm. 3,8 g.). Rome. S C behind laureate head of Jupiter right. Rev. L PROCILI F, Juno Sospita walking right, wielding spear, shield on left arm, coiled serpent at foot right. Crawford 379/1; Sydenham 771; Procilia 1; Sear 306.

IMG_4803.jpeg.9cd06374df8121ad021eec49de7e4c0d.jpeg

L Rustius, 74 BC. AR Denarius (19 mm. 3,7 g.). Rome. Helmeted head of Mars right. SC behind head, X beneath chin. Rev. Ram standing right, L RVSTI in exergue. Crawford 389/1; Sydenham 782; Rustia 1; Sear 320.

 

Congratulations! My favorite is the Juno Sospita.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

Congratulations! My favorite is the Juno Sospita.

I bidded on the L. Procilius denarius because Juno Sospita’s head is fully struck with facial details. Most examples of this type I’ve seen have Juno’s head flatly struck.

Over the years, I’ve unintentionally compiled a type set of Juno Sospita denarii:

IMG_4828.jpeg.764db7b5f81fdad0a9356fbe885446a1.jpeg

IMG_4829.jpeg.56f807bf16e6b7120ddffa6cdadf9c98.jpeg

IMG_4830.jpeg.ef178dea16f1cd8b5ee84174d9eb603c.jpeg

IMG_4831.jpeg.22ef05761af95d2429682a653cfcc861.jpeg

 

  • Like 13
  • Heart Eyes 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice Pompey Magnus!

Here's my budget version for a portrait coin. 

pompeymagnus.jpg.f1b28a8683e6035dbd666ca7e631c11f.jpg

Obv: Head of Pompey the Great; A behind.
Rev: ΠΟΜΠΗΙΟΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ.  
Nike advancing right, holding palm frond and wreath; two monograms to right. Countermark in the center. Between 64/63 BC to 48 BC, 4.62g.


 

  • Like 8
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
Posted · Benefactor
12 hours ago, MrMonkeySwag96 said:

I bidded on the L. Procilius denarius because Juno Sospita’s head is fully struck with facial details. Most examples of this type I’ve seen have Juno’s head flatly struck.

Over the years, I’ve unintentionally compiled a type set of Juno Sospita denarii:

IMG_4828.jpeg.764db7b5f81fdad0a9356fbe885446a1.jpeg

IMG_4829.jpeg.56f807bf16e6b7120ddffa6cdadf9c98.jpeg

IMG_4830.jpeg.ef178dea16f1cd8b5ee84174d9eb603c.jpeg

IMG_4831.jpeg.22ef05761af95d2429682a653cfcc861.jpeg

 

A great set! My favorite Juno coins all depict her as Juno Sospita -- "the goddess clad in a goat’s skin, who was especially sacred to the inhabitants of Lanuvium (modern Lanuvio), an ancient Latin city in the Alban Hills about twenty miles south-east of Rome,” known for its annual Juno Sospita festival, including the ceremony in a grotto beneath her temple involving a maiden feeding a snake. See David Sear, The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 BC (1998), p. 52; RSC I p. 85.

I believe I have only one type that you don't have, namely the third coin below:

image.png.9dda91d03670e24cc5be386567aac354.png

image.png.734f5dba033679b84b22856b2743cb95.png

image.png.b093c065638a3e394bf4c0917f84aa1c.png

image.png.bc26017c279a552e38c415d9771ec181.png

image.png.446a28a5cd5fb314031453215517faab.png

image.png.7fc25ae5afba430723fb2604417e57b3.png

  • Like 5
  • Heart Eyes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice batch of auction wins.  My only auctions are on eBay, and since I blow my budget there, I dare not look elsewhere.  I like too all those Juno Sospita examples - this one is a bit unusual as she is on a sestertius of Antoninus Pius:

image.jpeg.5174ba208ee39c05b9a801cf6bb61d92.jpeg

Antoninus Pius      Æ Sestertius (140-144 A.D.) Rome Mint [ANTON]INVS AVG PIVS PP TR P COS III, laureate head rt. / [IV]NONI SIS[PITAE], S-C, Juno Sospita advancing right, brandishing javelin & holding shield, snake before. RIC III 608; Cohen RSC 473; BMCRE 1248-1249. (27.53 grams / 32 x 29 mm) eBay Dec. 2023 MAWX

Die-Match Obv. and Rev.: American Numismatic Society (via OCRE) Identifier: 1952.41.1

Die-Match Obverse: British Museum Museum number R.13446 BMCRE 1249, p.201.

"This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon." FORVM Charles S

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...