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Posted (edited)

Ancient coins don't all come in MS-70 (perfect mint state, with no flaws, scratches, or wear visible under 5x magnification).

This coin looks like all of its 2100+ years - some interesting coloring, a little de-lamination on the left cheek of Mars, some light roughness on the reverse, the metal overall looks brittle and crystalized, even a little light encrustation on the obverse.  All told, it is also a coin that I found attractive with a high relief reverse and expressive portrait on the obverse.

image.png.b30093a6009df45515ad32b3297af38a.png

Roman Republic, Q. Minucius Thermus M. f., AR Denarius, Rome, 103 BC

Obv: Helmeted head of Mars to left

Rev: Two warriors in combat, one on left protecting a fallen comrade; Q•THERM•MF (ligate) in exergue

Ref: Crawford 319/1; BMCRR Italy 653-6; RSC Minucia 19.

The moneyer's ancestor of the same name, Quintus Minucius Q. f. L. n. Thermus, was elected consul in 193 and assigned Liguria as his province.  He was victorious over the Ligurians and ramained in Liguria for 191–190.

C. Cavedoni in "Di alcune medaglie di famiglie romane," Bullettino dell'Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica, in 1845, on pages 184-185 writes about this coin:

"Of the two fighters, on each side of the Roman citizen on the ground, the Roman seems to me to be the one on the left. His opponent holds a clipeus (shield) very similar to the Thracian pelta (shield) (See: Xenoph. Anab. VII.4, 13.Pollux, I, 134: Varrò, Lingua Latina VII.43 : Eurip. Alcest. v. 498. cf. Trésor de Glypt. B. rèi. du Parthenon, PI. I, VI).

We learn from Livy that Q. Mìnucio Termo, who had defeated the Ligurians and triumphed over Hispania, was sent as a legate to Asia, and on his return was mortally wounded in a conflict with the Thracian robbers, who attacked the army of Gnaeus Manlius in year 566 of Rome (Livius XXXVIII, 44, 46, 49)

"In eo proelio cum et impedimentorum et calonum pars et milites aliquot, cum passim toto prope saltu pugnaretur, cecidissent, plurimum Q. Minuci Thermi morte damni est acceptum, fortis ac strenui viri."

"In that battle, since it was fought at various points virtually all along the defile, some of the baggage and some camp followers were lost as well as a number of fighting men, but the most serious setback was the death of Quintus Minucius Thermus, a man of great courage and energy."

However, he did not die on the spot, since Gn. Manlius in his defense said that it was not in his power to prevent neither the wound, nor the death of the brave and energetic man, Q. Minucius. Fortunately the match of the name and the Thracian armor of the adversary leads me to find that this coin represents the saved citizen, otherwise I could have searched in a vain through historical memories of the Minncii Termi. It can therefore be assumed that the brave Q. Minucius Termus suffered a mortal wound while he saved the life of the citizen who fell to the ground at the feet of the two combatants. If not long after, he died from the wound he received, this does not detract from the glory of the heroic deed; just as Scipio Africanus in order to save his father in the battle of Trebbia, sustained a serious wound, and would not have been less noble and glorious had the wound subsequently resulted in his death."

image.png.56bd46e5c401008db4b9732d9bb8aff0.png

"Attic red-figure drinking cup depicting a warrior (“peltast”) wearing a Thracian cloak (decorated with stripes and geometric patterns), a cap with flaps, and boots while holding both a crescent shield (peltē) decorated with large eyes and a spear (ca. 470-460 BCE; now in the Sackler Museum, Harvard, inv. 1959.219):"

Thanks to @DonnaML for highlighting an important omission in this post: I am adding a couple of notes here for those who don't read the whole thread.

 Paully's Realencyclopädie for the entry RE: Minucius 65  is hesitant on the association of the reverse : "Minucius's death in the fight against the Thracians was glorified a hundred years later by his descendant of the same name No. 66 on his denarii, if the barbarian depicted here, from whom a Roman warrior is protecting his fallen companion, is really characterized by the horn decorations on his helmet as a Thracian."

Crawford is more dismissive of the precise alignment to this fight: "The types doubtless allude to an act of martial heroism of one the moneyer's ancestors - it is idle (pace C Cavedoni Bulletino 1843, 184) to speculate which."  Crawford could be a more specific about his objection to Cavedoni's argument.

Post your coins that show their age - and are more attractive because they do (or anything else you find interesting or entertaining).

Edited by Sulla80
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Posted · Supporter

That's a splendid reverse @Sulla80 . I agree: attractive despite the age!

Here is a coin that shows the wear & tear of millennia - but I like it nonetheless (and I probably wouldn't have been able to afford a nicer one!)

SextusPompeydenarius.jpg.10e4f459081cf1c6c66496ee5fc6ad31.jpg

SEXTUS POMPEY, c. 45-35 BC
Son of Pompey the Great
AR Denarius (18.10mm, 3.31g, 11h)
Struck 42-40 BC. Sicily mint
Obverse: MAG • PIVS • IMP • ITER, bare head of Pompey the Great right, jug behind, lituus in front
Reverse: Neptune standing left, holding aplustre and resting right foot on prow, between the Catanaean brothers Anapias and Amphinomus, each bearing one of his parents on shoulders
References: Crawford 511/3a, RCV 1392

Poor surfaces but a decent portrait of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus.

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Both are beautiful, I agree.

9ipZfA48Jgs7zq6Bt8HQ2BbNwDf3We(1).jpg.7987a1e79fda340b14d9bf979a4ee665.jpg

I love the wear and tear on ancients. This is one of my favs, I like everything about it. Early lifetime Alexander from Sidon. 

 

 

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In this case, the wear sort of highlights the devices.

Roman Syria. Seleucis and Pieria. Antioch. Galba, AD 68-69. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 14.22g, 12h). Antioch mint. Dated RY 2 (AD 68/69). Obv: AYTOKPATωP ΓAΛBAC KAICAP CЄBAC[TOC]; Bare head right. Rev: ЄTOYC B; Eagle standing left, wreath in beak, on two laurel branches; palm to left. Ref: RPC I 4198; McAlee 308; Prieur 100 (31).

image.jpeg.579d7417735880865ff5f8e9a6087e2d.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

5-Asses: (Similar to a Roman AR Quinarius)
[IMG]
ETRURIA, POPULONIA.
Etruria Populonia
AR 5 Asses 2.0g
3rd C BCE
Obv: Young Head L, V (denomination) behind
Rev: blank
HN 173 Vecchi Rasna III 52 ex NAC 29 No 9 R

Edited by Alegandron
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2 hours ago, Sulla80 said:

Ancient coins don't all come in MS-70 (perfect mint state, with no flaws, scratches, or wear visible under 5x magnification).

This coin looks like all of its 2100+ years - some interesting coloring, a little de-lamination on the left cheek of Mars, some light roughness on the reverse, the metal overall looks brittle and crystalized, even a little light encrustation on the obverse.  All told, it is also a coin that I found attractive with a high relief reverse and expressive portrait on the obverse.

image.png.b30093a6009df45515ad32b3297af38a.png

Roman Republic, Q. Minucius Thermus M. f., AR Denarius, Rome, 103 BC

Obv: Helmeted head of Mars to left

Rev: Two warriors in combat, one on left protecting a fallen comrade; Q•THERM•MF (ligate) in exergue

Ref: Crawford 319/1; BMCRR Italy 653-6; RSC Minucia 19.

The moneyer's ancestor of the same name, Quintus Minucius Q. f. L. n. Thermus, was elected consul in 193 and assigned Liguria as his province.  He was victorious over the Ligurians and ramained in Liguria for 191–190.

C. Cavedoni in "Di alcune medaglie di famiglie romane," Bullettino dell'Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica, in 1845, on pages 184-185 writes about this coin:

"Of the two fighters, on each side of the Roman citizen on the ground, the Roman seems to me to be the one on the left. His opponent holds a clipeus (shield) very similar to the Thracian pelta (shield) (See: Xenoph. Anab. VII.4, 13.Pollux, I, 134: Varrò, Lingua Latina VII.43 : Eurip. Alcest. v. 498. cf. Trésor de Glypt. B. rèi. du Parthenon, PI. I, VI).

We learn from Livy that Q. Mìnucio Termo, who had defeated the Ligurians and triumphed over Hispania, was sent as a legate to Asia, and on his return was mortally wounded in a conflict with the Thracian robbers, who attacked the army of Gnaeus Manlius in year 566 of Rome (Livius XXXVIII, 44, 46, 49)

"In eo proelio cum et impedimentorum et calonum pars et milites aliquot, cum passim toto prope saltu pugnaretur, cecidissent, plurimum Q. Minuci Thermi morte damni est acceptum, fortis ac strenui viri."

"In that battle, since it was fought at various points virtually all along the defile, some of the baggage and some camp followers were lost as well as a number of fighting men, but the most serious setback was the death of Quintus Minucius Thermus, a man of great courage and energy."

However, he did not die on the spot, since Gn. Manlius in his defense said that it was not in his power to prevent neither the wound, nor the death of the brave and energetic man, Q. Minucius. Fortunately the match of the name and the Thracian armor of the adversary leads me to find that this coin represents the saved citizen, otherwise I could have searched in a vain through historical memories of the Minncii Termi. It can therefore be assumed that the brave Q. Minucius Termus suffered a mortal wound while he saved the life of the citizen who fell to the ground at the feet of the two combatants. If not long after, he died from the wound he received, this does not detract from the glory of the heroic deed; just as Scipio Africanus in order to save his father in the battle of Trebbia, sustained a serious wound, and would not have been less noble and glorious had the wound subsequently resulted in his death."

image.png.56bd46e5c401008db4b9732d9bb8aff0.png

"Attic red-figure drinking cup depicting a warrior (“peltast”) wearing a Thracian cloak (decorated with stripes and geometric patterns), a cap with flaps, and boots while holding both a crescent shield (peltē) decorated with large eyes and a spear (ca. 470-460 BCE; now in the Sackler Museum, Harvard, inv. 1959.219):"

 

Post your coins that show their age - and are more attractive because they do (or anything else you find interesting or entertaining).

Great coin and write-up, @Sulla80. I think everyone agrees that the fighter on the left is the Roman, protecting his fallen comrade, and the one on the right is the barbarian. I'm sure you're aware, though, that Crawford specifically cites Cavedoni in asserting that although "the types doubtless allude to an act of martial heroism of one of the moneyer's ancestors," it is "idle (pace C. Cavedoni [citation omitted]) to speculate which"! (See Crawford I p. 325.) Here's my specimen of the type; I'm especially fond of "chubby Mars" on the obverse:

image.png.174ce35e3842d7df94959d5d744e0f03.png

 

I have plenty of worn coins, but my favorite may be this one, which happens to be the very first Roman Republican coin I ever bought, at a New York City coin show almost 40 years ago:

Roman Republic, Ti. Veturius, AR Denarius 137 BCE. Obv. Helmeted head of Mars right, TI. VET (monogrammed) and X behind head. / Rev. Youth holding pig, kneeling left, head right, between two soldiers who touch the pig with their swords, ROMA above. RSC I Veturia 1, Crawford 234/1, Sydenham 527, Sear RCV I 111 (ill.), BMCRR Italy 550. 18 mm., 3.8 g. [First Republican denarius to have head of anyone other than Roma on obverse.]  Purchased April 12, 1986 from Sarr Coin Co., Lighthouse Point, FL. 

image.jpeg.cfd68685a023cea1c8de8b376941e960.jpeg

 

 

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My first Republican coin purchase. Old, toned and worn! And I LOVE it!!

[IMG]
L. Mussidius Longus, Moneyer 42 BCE.
Roman Republican AR denarius, 3.48 gm, 16.4 mm, 4 h.
Rome, 42 BCE.
Obv: Draped bust of Marc Antony's 3rd wife, Fulvia, as Victory, right.
Rev: L·MVSSIDIVS LONGVS, Victory in biga right, holding reins in both hands.
Refs: RRC 494/40; BMCRR 4229; RCV 1517; Sydenham 1095; RSC Mussidia 4; Banti Mussidia 613.

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Wonderful examples shown above. I have one I am very fond of. A lot of wear, attractive toning but still recognisable for what it is after 2000+ years.

L. TITURIUS L. F. SABINUS. Denarius (89 BC). Rome.
Head of Tatius right, SABIN behind, A.PV before / L TITVRI in exergue, Tarpeia buried to her waist in shields, fending off two soldiers about to throw their shields on her. Tituria 5
sear5 #252,Cr344/2c, Syd 699a.
( 3.69 g. 19.4 mm ).
In Roman legend, Tarpeia, daughter of the Roman commander Spurius Tarpeius, was a Vestal Virgin who betrayed the city of Rome to the Sabines at the time of their women's abduction for what she thought would be a reward of jewelry. She was instead crushed to death by Sabine shields and her body cast from the southern cliff of Rome's Capitoline Hill, thereafter called after her the Tarpeian Rock (Rupes Tarpeia).

5300181_1710860060.l-removebg-preview.png.3e6de26be5fef3bd13be80373a81b620.png

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, DonnaML said:

Great coin and write-up, @Sulla80. I think everyone agrees that the fighter on the left is the Roman, protecting his fallen comrade, and the one on the right is the barbarian. I'm sure you're aware, though, that Crawford specifically cites Cavedoni in asserting that although "the types doubtless allude to an act of martial heroism of one of the moneyer's ancestors," it is "idle (pace C. Cavedoni [citation omitted]) to speculate which"! (See Crawford I p. 325.) Here's my specimen of the type; I'm especially fond of "chubby Mars" on the obverse:

image.png.174ce35e3842d7df94959d5d744e0f03.png

Thanks Donna, you point out an important omission in the OP (Crawford's comment).  While many have read the Crawford reference, few have probably read the argument from Cavedoni in which he does provide some evidence.  With this entry, Crawford's argument would be more credible if he provided examples that could compete with Cavedoni's proposed Q. Minucius Thermus who was known for heroism against a Thracian fighter or perhaps offered an argument that the Thracian fighter is incorrectly identified on the coin or perhaps that it was not common to reference a relative with the same name.

This Q. Minucius Thermus is the first known member of this branch of the Minucii, and was a military tribune in 202 BC, tribune of the plebs in 201 BC, praetor in 196 BC, he received a triumph for his victories in Hispania Citerior, consul in 193 BC, and he defeated the Ligurians / Ligures as proconsul in 191 BC.  At the time issued (103 BC) there is only one other Q. Minucius Thermus who is still known today: the triumvir monetalis of 103BC.

This sounds like someone a rising politician might want to be associated with, and seems more than coincidence unless we challenge the Thacian dress argument or have evidence of other heroic Minucii Thermi before 103 BC.  As we look from 2000 years later, the story of this Q. Minucius Thermus was so well known that it is still not forgotten.

Adding another coin of this type that I have: this one EF+ and showing a scrape on the nose that that is from the day it was minted.  This coin also seems that have a moon shaped Thacian pelta (shield) in the hands of the warrior on the right:

image.png.132599dc24611dab7504b9fcbe898b79.png

Edited by Sulla80
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3 hours ago, Sulla80 said:

Thanks Donna, you point out an important omission in the OP (Crawford's comment).  While many have read the Crawford reference, few have probably read the argument from Cavedoni in which he does provide some evidence.  With this entry, Crawford's argument would be more credible if he provided examples that could compete with Cavedoni's proposed Q. Minucius Thermus who was known for heroism against a Thracian fighter or perhaps offered an argument that the Thracian fighter is incorrectly identified on the coin or perhaps that it was not common to reference a relative with the same name.

This Q. Minucius Thermus is the first known member of this branch of the Minucii, was a military tribune in 202 BC, tribune of the plebs in 201 BC, praetor in 196 BC, he received a triumph for his victories in Hispania Citerior, consul in 193 BC, and he defeated the Ligurians / Ligures as proconsul in 191 BC.  At the time issued (103 BC) there is only one other Q. Minucius Thermus who is still known today: the triumvir monetalis of 103BC.

This sounds like someone a rising politician might want to be associated with, and seems more than coincidence unless we challenge the Thacian dress argument or have evidence of other heroic Minucii Thermi before 103 BC.  As we look from 2000 years later, the story of this Q. Minucius Thermus was so well known that it is still not forgotten.

Adding another coin of this type that I have: this one EF+ and showing a scrape on the nose that that is from the day it was minted.  This coin also seems that have a moon shaped Thacian peltaq (shield) in the hands of the warrior on the right:

image.png.132599dc24611dab7504b9fcbe898b79.png

I have to say that Crawford's arguments -- often made in cursory fashion -- don't always hold up when carefully examined. This appears to be one of the times they don't.

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12 hours ago, Alegandron said:

upload_2022-5-5_14-44-25.png
RR 234-231 BCE AR Heavy Denarius - Didrachm Apollo-Horse prancing Crawford 26-1 Sear 28 R

That one drives me crazy @Alegandron, it's so beautiful, and should really stand together with my two own heavy denarii !! 😄 

BTW, one of them reaches the OP requirements : it shows its age and I love it as it is

ebc79c77a2104dc8bc099cd8d6ce2dd8.jpg

Roman republic, anonymous didrachm (heavy denarius) - Rome mint c. 240 BCE
No legend, Head of youthful Mars to right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a griffin springing right
ROMA Head of a bridled horse to right. To left, sickle
6,33 gr - 19 mm - 6 h
Ref : Crawford # 25/1, RCV # 26, RBW # 38, RSC # 34, Sydenham # 24 Albert # 50

Q

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Qcumbor said:

That one drives me crazy @Alegandron, it's so beautiful, and should really stand together with my two own heavy denarii !! 😄 

BTW, one of them reaches the OP requirements : it shows its age and I love it as it is

ebc79c77a2104dc8bc099cd8d6ce2dd8.jpg

Roman republic, anonymous didrachm (heavy denarius) - Rome mint c. 240 BCE
No legend, Head of youthful Mars to right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a griffin springing right
ROMA Head of a bridled horse to right. To left, sickle
6,33 gr - 19 mm - 6 h
Ref : Crawford # 25/1, RCV # 26, RBW # 38, RSC # 34, Sydenham # 24 Albert # 50

Q

Thank you very much.  And, Yours are GREAT!!

I really like these coins from that original AR series.  I have a few more:

This is the Quinarius / Drachm version of yours:

RRAnonCa240BCEARHeavyQuinariusDrachm16mm3.0gRomeHelmetHdMarsr-HorseshdsickleCr25-2Syd25RSC34aVeryRare.JPG.d48a30e18b20ec8384fd3dd51ec8a0af.JPG

RR Anon Ca 240 BCE AR Heavy Quinarius Drachm 16mm 3.0g Rome Helmet Hd Mars r - Horse’s hd sickle Cr 25-2 Syd 25 RSC 34a VeryRare

 

RRAnonARHeavyDenarius-Didrachm275-270BCEROMANOApolloLeft-GallopingHorseSear23.jpg.5a7d6f64b2d3f1ce9b55d8bc24054d10.jpg

RR Anon AR Heavy Denarius -  Didrachm 275-270 BCE ROMANO Apollo Left-Galloping Horse Sear23

 

RR265-242BCEARHeavyDenarius-DidrachmRoma-VictoryCrawford22-1Sear25EuchariusRare.JPG.4742b2f66c572e4cf0021076b6675871.JPG

RR 265-242 BCE AR Heavy Denarius -  Didrachm Roma-Victory Crawford 22-1 Sear 25 Eucharius R

 

RRAnonARHeavyDenarius-Quadrigatus-Didrachm225-215BCEIncuseRomaJanusJupiterCr28-3S31.jpg.901bdf3a6c9d05607cc19c88fc425662.jpg

RR Anon AR Heavy Denarius -Quadrigatus - Didrachm 225-215 BCE Incuse Roma Janus Jupiter Cr 28-3 S 31

 

RRAnonARHeavyQuinariusQuadrigatusDrachm216-214BCEJanusROMAJupiterVictoryQuadrigaLEFTCr29-4S35.jpg.2d71c71de725b9bc9139108856df3b95.jpg

RR Anon AR Heavy Quinarius Quadrigatus Drachm 216-214 BCE Janus ROMA Jupiter Victory Quadriga LEFT Cr  29-4 S 35

 

 

 

Edited by Alegandron
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16 hours ago, Sulla80 said:

Ancient coins don't all come in MS-70 (perfect mint state, with no flaws, scratches, or wear visible under 5x magnification).

This coin looks like all of its 2100+ years - some interesting coloring, a little de-lamination on the left cheek of Mars, some light roughness on the reverse, the metal overall looks brittle and crystalized, even a little light encrustation on the obverse.  All told, it is also a coin that I found attractive with a high relief reverse and expressive portrait on the obverse.

image.png.b30093a6009df45515ad32b3297af38a.png

Roman Republic, Q. Minucius Thermus M. f., AR Denarius, Rome, 103 BC

Obv: Helmeted head of Mars to left

Rev: Two warriors in combat, one on left protecting a fallen comrade; Q•THERM•MF (ligate) in exergue

Ref: Crawford 319/1; BMCRR Italy 653-6; RSC Minucia 19.

The moneyer's ancestor of the same name, Quintus Minucius Q. f. L. n. Thermus, was elected consul in 193 and assigned Liguria as his province.  He was victorious over the Ligurians and ramained in Liguria for 191–190.

C. Cavedoni in "Di alcune medaglie di famiglie romane," Bullettino dell'Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica, in 1845, on pages 184-185 writes about this coin:

"Of the two fighters, on each side of the Roman citizen on the ground, the Roman seems to me to be the one on the left. His opponent holds a clipeus (shield) very similar to the Thracian pelta (shield) (See: Xenoph. Anab. VII.4, 13.Pollux, I, 134: Varrò, Lingua Latina VII.43 : Eurip. Alcest. v. 498. cf. Trésor de Glypt. B. rèi. du Parthenon, PI. I, VI).

We learn from Livy that Q. Mìnucio Termo, who had defeated the Ligurians and triumphed over Hispania, was sent as a legate to Asia, and on his return was mortally wounded in a conflict with the Thracian robbers, who attacked the army of Gnaeus Manlius in year 566 of Rome (Livius XXXVIII, 44, 46, 49)

"In eo proelio cum et impedimentorum et calonum pars et milites aliquot, cum passim toto prope saltu pugnaretur, cecidissent, plurimum Q. Minuci Thermi morte damni est acceptum, fortis ac strenui viri."

"In that battle, since it was fought at various points virtually all along the defile, some of the baggage and some camp followers were lost as well as a number of fighting men, but the most serious setback was the death of Quintus Minucius Thermus, a man of great courage and energy."

However, he did not die on the spot, since Gn. Manlius in his defense said that it was not in his power to prevent neither the wound, nor the death of the brave and energetic man, Q. Minucius. Fortunately the match of the name and the Thracian armor of the adversary leads me to find that this coin represents the saved citizen, otherwise I could have searched in a vain through historical memories of the Minncii Termi. It can therefore be assumed that the brave Q. Minucius Termus suffered a mortal wound while he saved the life of the citizen who fell to the ground at the feet of the two combatants. If not long after, he died from the wound he received, this does not detract from the glory of the heroic deed; just as Scipio Africanus in order to save his father in the battle of Trebbia, sustained a serious wound, and would not have been less noble and glorious had the wound subsequently resulted in his death."

image.png.56bd46e5c401008db4b9732d9bb8aff0.png

"Attic red-figure drinking cup depicting a warrior (“peltast”) wearing a Thracian cloak (decorated with stripes and geometric patterns), a cap with flaps, and boots while holding both a crescent shield (peltē) decorated with large eyes and a spear (ca. 470-460 BCE; now in the Sackler Museum, Harvard, inv. 1959.219):"

Thanks to @DonnaML for highlighting an important omission in this post: I am adding a couple of notes here for those who don't read the whole thread.

 Paully's Realencyclopädie for the entry RE: Minucius 65  is hesitant on the association of the reverse : "Minucius's death in the fight against the Thracians was glorified a hundred years later by his descendant of the same name No. 66 on his denarii, if the barbarian depicted here, from whom a Roman warrior is protecting his fallen companion, is really characterized by the horn decorations on his helmet as a Thracian."

Crawford is more dismissive of the precise alignment to this fight: "The types doubtless allude to an act of martial heroism of one the moneyer's ancestors - it is idle (pace C Cavedoni Bulletino 1843, 184) to speculate which."  Crawford could be a more specific about his objection to Cavedoni's argument.

Post your coins that show their age - and are more attractive because they do (or anything else you find interesting or entertaining).

And think of the thousands of Ancients who handled, pocketed and spent that coin and all the goods and service it provided them with.

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, Alegandron said:

RR265-242BCEARHeavyDenarius-DidrachmRoma-VictoryCrawford22-1Sear25EuchariusRare.JPG.4742b2f66c572e4cf0021076b6675871.JPG

 

RR 265-242 BCE AR Heavy Denarius -  Didrachm Roma-Victory Crawford 22-1 Sear 25 Eucharius R

You and @Qcumbor are both posting some very nice coins from my early RR wishlist.

I'll add this worn beauty from Egypt that recalls the end of the Roman Republic. I have no plans to spend tens of thousands on a perfect bronze coin of Cleopatra VII. However, I do find this well-aged lump of Egyptian bronze quite satisfying. It was issued by Queen Cleopatra. Her title, ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ, is just readable on the reverse. Cleopatra was allied with Mark Antony, who was fighting Octavian for control of the republic.  Octavian used this alliance against Mark Antony.

KleopatraVIIEgypt.jpg.044e96c21facd7998f9a58f98a151ea6.jpg

More on Cleopatra here: https://www.sullacoins.com/post/cleopatra-queen-of-egypt

image.png.f981add5454ad4c1f2f56e5fd3f979cd.png

Edited by Sulla80
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4 hours ago, Sulla80 said:

You and @Qcumbor are both posting some very nice coins from my early RR wishlist.

I'll add this worn beauty from Egypt that recalls the end of the Roman Republic. I have no plans to spend tens of thousands on a perfect bronze coin of Cleopatra VII. However, I do find this well-aged lump of Egyptian bronze quite satisfying. It was issued by Queen Cleopatra. Her title, ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ, is just readable on the reverse. Cleopatra was allied with Mark Antony, who was fighting Octavian for control of the republic.  Octavian used this alliance against Mark Antony.

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More on Cleopatra here: https://www.sullacoins.com/post/cleopatra-queen-of-egypt

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@Qcumbor (Cuke) has a great Hercules RR Didrachm that is super. Between the two of us, we have most of the Series. They are all purdy scarce.

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9 hours ago, DonnaML said:

I have to say that Crawford's arguments -- often made in cursory fashion -- don't always hold up when carefully examined. This appears to be one of the times they don't.

I find it reassuring to think that he might have experienced human moments where he is a little rushed, uninterested, or otherwise mildly imperfect....🙂

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2 hours ago, Sulla80 said:

I find it reassuring to think that he might have experienced human moments where he is a little rushed, uninterested, or otherwise mildly imperfect....🙂

FYI, I had a chance to look at my copy of BMCRR II Italy, and it seems from this footnote that Grueber agreed with Cavedoni:

image.jpeg.a244cbb1f76c20a4fc5b764442da1a0d.jpeg

See BMCRR II Italy 653 n. 2 at p. 302.

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