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Crusty Commemorative - Constantine The Great founds Constantinople


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ConstantinopolisVictoryOBV.jpg.e96d3b789c5e7908c3373efa9db9cc4c.jpg

 

ConstantinopolisVictoryREV.jpg.1c535b652b29dd5f902265f1051e7f9c.jpg

Obverse : Constantinopolis
Constantine The Great founds Constantinople
City Commemorative type
Reverse: Victory on prow

CONSTANTINOPOLIS, a very common Roman coin type. Under the Roman emperor Constantine the Great, who ruled 307-337 AD

The obverse on this coin is a bust of Constantinopolis so it's a metaphor.
The Victory-on-prow reverse commemorates a naval victory led by Crispus, which aided in securing the city of Byzantium, which would be remade into Constantinople. It would continue on as the center of the Byzantine Empire.

Looks like bat wings on Victory. I have learned that a "Prow" is the very forward part of a ship.

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10 hours ago, thenickelguy said:

I have learned that a "Prow" is the very forward part of a ship.

Yes, used here presumably because there wasn't enough room on a small coin like this to show the whole ship, which we do however see on a medallion version (RIC VII Rome 301) of the same basic type:

image.png.168af94dddaf727fc16f2eefa681f961.png

The prow was also a symbolically important part of the ship since it included the bronze "rostrum" ramming head that would be used to try to punch holes in enemy ships. The rostrum gives it's name to the rostral column, decorated with prows/rostra, which were sometimes used to commemorate naval victories.

image.png.b52c87420eb1eba160a7b4c759f30b51.png

Edited by Heliodromus
fixed puntuation
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  • 1 month later...

Just picked up this one, thought I'd add it here...This is my first of this type, could someone just check my attribution please?

20220812_Bnk9D2Qn3CoMeJE8PJ4pNaQ65EMfps-2.jpg.0709d6713855b6759b8b1cebc30bbd24.jpg

Commemorative Series. 330-354 AD. AE Follis (2.03 gm, 16mm). Trier mint. Struck 330/1 AD.

Obv.: CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS, mantled bust of Constantinopolis left wearing laureate crested helmet and holding sceptre over shoulder.

Rev.: Victory standing facing, head left, in prow of galley holding sceptre and resting on shield; TRP dot;.

RIC#530 P ; LRBC 59. Sear 16444 (aEF.)

 

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33 minutes ago, Spaniard said:

Just picked up this one, thought I'd add it here...This is my first of this type, could someone just check my attribution please?

20220812_Bnk9D2Qn3CoMeJE8PJ4pNaQ65EMfps-2.jpg.0709d6713855b6759b8b1cebc30bbd24.jpg

Commemorative Series. 330-354 AD. AE Follis (2.03 gm, 16mm). Trier mint. Struck 330/1 AD.

Obv.: CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS, mantled bust of Constantinopolis left wearing laureate crested helmet and holding sceptre over shoulder.

Rev.: Victory standing facing, head left, in prow of galley holding sceptre and resting on shield; TRP dot;.

RIC#530 P ; LRBC 59. Sear 16444 (aEF.)

 

33 minutes ago, Spaniard said:

 

Correct. Similar: https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=9626401

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Bronze coin (AE 3/4) minted at Constantinople during the reign of Constantine I, The Great between 330 - 346 A.D. Commemorative Issue. CONSTANTINOPOLIS. Obv. Helmeted bust of Constantinopolis l., wearing imperial mantle & holding sceptre. Rev. No legend Victory standing l., r. foot on prow holding sceptre & leaning on shield. RCS #3890. RICVIII #32. DVM #1.

 

JNI-294 OBV.jpg

JNI-294 REV.jpg

JNB-106 OBV.jpg

JNB-106 REV.jpg

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Just picked up this one...5iRJ7Sr2n8D3KdW4sn7Z6WJoqP9T3j.jpg.ce8a4c36363265c129e3fb018a3cf459.jpg

City Commemorative. 330-354 AD. AE Follis (2.40 gm, 17mm). Antioch mint. Struck 330-335 AD.
Obv.: VRBS ROMA, helmeted head of Roma left, wearing imperial mantle and ornamental necklace.
Rev.: she-wolf standing left, suckling Romulus and Remus, two stars above; SMANZ in exergue. RIC#91.

Here's a great site for those interested...Paul
http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/comm/

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