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FEL TEMP REPARATIO - Fallen Horseman - Amiens


maridvnvm
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The FEL TEMP REPARATIO = Fallen horsemean type is relatively difficult to obtain from Trier and Amiens (Ambianum). I have been quite fortunate in recent years to obtain a few Amiens examples with my most recent arriving today.

The first coins come without letters in the field behind the bust and my newest coin is one of these.

Constantius II

Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He is bare headed
Minted in Amiens (//AMB). 353 AD.
Reference:- RIC VIII Amiens 46 (R)

20.28 mm, 4.98g, 180 degrees

RI_170gr_img.JPG

When comparing this coin with the example on Wildwinds it can be seen to be of a very different style and that is due to the Wildwinds example being an Antioch ANTheta that has been mis-attributed.

From the same issues is this Constantius Gallus


Obv:– DN CONSTANTI-VS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching back towards soldier
Minted in Amiens. (// AMB)
Reference:– RIC VIII Amiens 47 (S)

3.53g. 22.15 mm. 180 degrees

RI_175ad_img.jpg

Then comes the issue with A behind the bust which only occurs for Constantius II

D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, A behind bust
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He is bare headed
Minted in Amiens (//AMB). 353 AD.
Reference:- RIC VIII Amiens 48 (C)

RI_170fi_img.jpg

There is also RIC 49 (Rated R3) where the horseman wears a pointed Phrygian cap. I have yet to see one of these.

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Great additions Martin! Congrats on adding examples from these scarcer mints. 
 

My most recent example is from Heraclea... I think! 🙂 

F5B4056C-A869-4B5D-A631-5A355AF3E975.thumb.jpeg.536690f91dca3b321c483aaae0f8c5ff.jpeg
Roman Empire
Constantius II
AE Centenionalis, Heraclea mint, struck ca. AD 350-355
Dia.: 22.5 mm
Wt.: 5.3 g
Obv.: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG; Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO; Γ in left field, SMH (?) in exergue; Helmeted soldier spearing fallen horseman who is reaching back. Hair in braids, no beard. Plain shields.
Ref.: RIC 82 Heraclea (?)
Purchased from Minotaur Coins

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Here’s my two from Amiens(Ambianum). I always say that I wish I could combine the best features from each into one coin! 
ConstantiusIIAmiensRIC48.thumb.JPG.a55fa419ef0ead90398016d2ea107419.JPG

ConstantiusIIA.thumb.JPG.6f77cf1cde18eb46be8deea9219eea99.JPG
Combine the obverse of coin 1, the reverse of coin 2, with the visible mint mark of coin 1!

Edited by Orange Julius
Adding flavor
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6 hours ago, Severus Alexander said:

You have an increasingly impressive FTR collection, Martin.  I hope they fix the Wildwinds error soon!

Here's a Nicomedia I couldn't resist recently at only 10 EUR or so.  I love the expression on the poor horse:

image.thumb.jpeg.40b901fb2c91f2bd8574d550afe64bcc.jpeg

Largemouth horse? 

Nice coin. 🙂

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Great Fallen Horsemen, Martin (oh, and everybody else as well)

 

Fallen Horseman, eh? 

 

CONSTANTIUS II SILVERED AE2 (Maiorina/Centenonialis)

Heraclea mint, 1st Office

348-351 AD

Diameter: Large size: 22 mm

Weight: 5.1 grams

Obverse: : D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust to right

Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier standing left, knee raised, spearing fallen horseman and is reaching backwards. Left field: Star. Mintmark SMHA in exergue

Reference: RIC VIII 67

Other: a great exemplar of this interesting coin, conserving full details including the 30% of the original silvering ... very strong relief 

Ex-stevex6

 

Fallen Horseman.jpg

The poor lil' dude is gonna get a spear in the butt!!

Edited by Steve
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Consider the source, but I can very cheerfully second @Curtisimo and @Severus Alexander about how cool Amiens is as a late Roman mint.

...This will verge on the subversive, but especially over the late Carolingian and early Capetian periods (c. 10th-11th c.), I find Amiens, and the whole region, of compelling interest.  Evidence of the cultural continuity (at least) between that and the 4th century is thick on the ground.  So, Oops, here are my two deniers of Amiens.

image.jpeg.3db7941d443b5628681f3120cbf90c7f.jpeg

Amiens; your standard-brand immobilization of the commonest Carolingian type of Charles the Bald, the Edict of Pitres /'GDR' type, intitially issued c. 865-877.

Obv.  Degraded 'KAROLVS' monogram; (Very ostensibly:) +GRATIA D-I REX.

Rev.  Cross; [+]AMBIAN C[IVIS?]. 

Poey d'Avant, 6385, var.  Lacking the crescent in the 1st angle of the cross, this likely predates the examples cited by Dumas (Trésor de Fécamp, a primary later 10th-c. hoard from Normandy).  On the basis of, Ahem, style, it could be only as early as the mid-10th century.  

image.jpeg.9937b44f2fb1b5934eb19374d11d8f7f.jpeg

image.jpeg.89b501cdd7c0f7824bd203cf0c1c9131.jpeg

This is a later (Snort) development in the same, um, process.  Here, the variant 'KAROLVS' monogram is distinctive enough to suggest numismatic 'authorial intent,' above and beyond the progressive illiteracy of Carolingian immobilizations all over the country during the same period.  Cf. Dumas,   6579-80 and Pl. VIII, including a line drawing from Poey d'Avant with a remarkably similar monogram.

...Right, outta here.  Sorry (just not enough) for crashing the party.  Guess I was just having too much fun as a spectator.

Edited by JeandAcre
YIPE! Dumas, Not Duplessy!
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2 hours ago, Steve said:

Great Fallen Horsemen, Martin (oh, and everybody else as well)

 

Fallen Horseman, eh? 

 

CONSTANTIUS II SILVERED AE2 (Maiorina/Centenonialis)

Heraclea mint, 1st Office

348-351 AD

Diameter: Large size: 22 mm

Weight: 5.1 grams

Obverse: : D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust to right

Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier standing left, knee raised, spearing fallen horseman and is reaching backwards. Left field: Star. Mintmark SMHA in exergue

Reference: RIC VIII 67

Other: a great exemplar of this interesting coin, conserving full details including the 30% of the original silvering ... very strong relief 

Ex-stevex6

 

Fallen Horseman.jpg

The poor lil' dude is gonna get a spear in the butt!!

Love that one!IMG_3676.jpg.d0a1edc5270884cef6bef64ab7f1c327.jpg

 

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FYI => that's a fantastic re-shoot photo, Geki (outstanding)

image.png.dd0b11428d90d45efeb98ba8bac5338e.png

image.png.2f9651db6e70b455d8c1f141a4436e5d.png

 

... now I want that fricken coin back!!

 

arrggghh ... oooops, sorry Martin ... I didn't mean to derail your thread (again ... Sweden coin)

 

geesh, it's only a matter of time before the guards come searching for me (sigh) 

 

Edited by Steve
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