Jump to content

Some New Trachea and Tetartera


Zimm
 Share

Recommended Posts

Since there really isn‘t an existing thread for trachea here on the forums, I‘ll just share a few of my latest wins I got this week here. The coins I bought aren‘t in the greatest of conditions, but they fill gaps I still have in my collection.

 

1. Sear 2259

B2339E44-8F74-417E-AF19-48F02E62EDA3.jpeg.da89d08835880ebed36574c78d561dca.jpeg

A rather common type, but an interesting type nonetheless as it was likely Michael VIII‘s first AE issue from Constantinople after its recapture from the Latins. It‘s also in quite nice condition.

 

2. Sear 2277

AE0327BE-60BA-46B6-8C16-21EE113B5A05.jpeg.d44b2bd89ec963f9d48566e5ae89d5bf.jpeg

A possible Magnesian issue of Michael VIII. Whilst not rare, it‘s not as common as many other issues from the same period (many of the examples of 2277 on acsearch are misidentified Bulgarian issues, hence making it seem more common than it actually is). My example really isn‘t in great condition, but since it‘s a scarcer type, and I‘m on a budget, I can‘t complain.

 

3. Sear 1967

46A9A550-E068-4967-8C48-87FB907087AF.jpeg.dbfa3e239f47af8dc87531e323e5d419.jpeg

Although not in amazing shape, this city tetarteron of Manuel caught my attention. When minted, the billon tetartera from Constantinople were given a silver wash, though the thin silver layer wore off quickly. Even though the silvering isn‘t perfectly preserved on this example either, it‘s better than on most.

4. Sear 2090

9BB6698B-2C9C-4407-8A93-C12F3E90CF8E.jpeg.354ee7a86e06ec47e6c619d4f0388a75.jpeg

A scarcer early issue of John III Vatatzes. Even though the reverse is in awful condition, you can still make out St. George on the obverse. Of the three types where John is crowned by Christ on the reverse (Sear 2089 with St. Michael on the obverse, 2090 with St. George, and 2091 with Mary), this type seems to be the rarest by far. 
 

I‘d love to see your examples of the same types or related ones.

Edited by Zimm
  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A probably Magnesian type for Michael VIII is S.2289 of ca. 1270:

1057664_1582380901.jpg.02dbaae33dfa28438050328faab5d41e.jpg

 

S.2349 seems to be scarce for Andronikos II, early in his sole reign at Constantinopolis:

1632165_1610721778.jpg.bb4fb08bb7c068c771c6eb52d1e66037.jpg

 

And my favorite series, the 'Latin religious types' of ca. 1240 which Metcalf assigned to eastern Thracia and the Black Sea shore under Ivan II Asen but are still usually discussed as 'Latin' trachea, here is S.2039 Type S:

mary.jpg.759cf946d5372f580dd326162781c96b.jpg

Edited by seth77
  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Zimm changed the title to Some New Trachea and Tetartera
34 minutes ago, seth77 said:

A probably Magnesian type for Michael VIII is S.2289 of ca. 1270:

1057664_1582380901.jpg.02dbaae33dfa28438050328faab5d41e.jpg

 

S.2349 seems to be scarce for Andronikos II, early in his sole reign at Constantinopolis:

1632165_1610721778.jpg.bb4fb08bb7c068c771c6eb52d1e66037.jpg

 

And my favorite series, the 'Latin religious types' of ca. 1240 which Metcalf assigned to eastern Thracia and the Black Sea shore under Ivan II Asen but are still usually discussed as 'Latin' trachea, here is S.2039 Type S:

mary.jpg.759cf946d5372f580dd326162781c96b.jpg

Interesting, I‘ll need to look into Metcalf‘s studies more then.

 

Those are great examples, I especially love the sharply struck seraph.

Here‘s my example of Sear 2289, but there‘s not much to look at. I found it in a group lot earlier this year.

8CB3A956-01BE-4AD6-93B0-7D4A09193228.jpeg.eff72f0c00f313e801004a687f843575.jpeg
Here‘s also my example of Sear 2352 where the Seraph design is much more clearly visible

1E8CFD06-B257-4B63-B69D-676BEE112CD8.jpeg.3a7d5804d07e4cbef27f31ab7bb79bad.jpeg
(Excuse the awful quality of the photo. I took it with my old phone that has a horrible camera)

Edited by Zimm
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the trachea of Thessalonica.  It has a lot of character!

 

Byzantine Empire: Andronicus III Palaeologus (1328-1341) Æ Trachy, Thessalonica (Sear 2486; DOC 927-8; LPC 236.6; PCPC 271; Lianta-836)

Obv: ΓΑΙ to left; ΔΗΤ to right; Half-length figure of St. Demetrius, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic, breastplate and sagion; right hand holds spear; left hand holds shield
Rev: Three-quarter-length figure of bearded emperor wearing stemma, divistion, cruciger place and loros, holding in both hands large patriarchal cross

normal_Sear-2486(1).jpg

 

Very rare ones that are classified as anonymous:

Kingdom of Thessalonica: Anonymous (ca. mid 13th century) BI Trachy (Sear-2226; DOC IV, 1; Lianta 433-35)

Obv: Wing, from which extends an arm holding a sword; above and below a star
Rev: Full-length figure of emperor bearded on right, and of beardless, nimbate saint (Demetrius); between them partially sheathed sword, point downward; Emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar-piece and jeweled loros of simplified type; left hand holds scepter; Saint wears short military tunic, breastplate and sagion; right hand holds spear?; In upper center field a star

Sear-2226.jpg

 

Latin Rulers of Constantinople: Anonymous (1204-1261) Æ Trachy, Constantinople (Lianta 103-106; CLBC 11.31.1)

Obv: Full-length figure of beardless and nimbate saint wearing short military tunic, breastplate and sagion; right hand spear resting over shoulder; left hand holding shield; O/Δ/ΓI to left; O/C to right
Rev: Full-length figure of emperor, wearing stemma, divitision, collar-piece and paneled loros of simplified type; right hand holds trilobate scepter; left hand holds globus cruciger.

normal_Lianta-103.jpg

Edited by quant.geek
  • Like 9
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the sibling to Sear 2090:

 

Empire of Nicaea: John III Ducas-Vatatzes (1221-1254) Æ Trachy, Magnesia Mint (Sear 2089; LBC 219-223; DOC 35)

Obv: Δ X in upper field; Three-quarter-length figure of St. Michael, wearing short military tunic, breastplate and sagion; right hand holding sword, resting over shoulder; left hand holds globus
Rev: IШ ΔЄCΠOTHC. IC XC in upper field; Full-length figure of emperor on left, crowned by Christ, bearded and nimbate; Emperor wears stemma division, and chlamys; right hand hold anexikakia; left hand holds globus cruciger; Christ holds Gospel in left hand

normal_Sear-2089.jpg

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, quant.geek said:

I like the trachea of Thessalonica.  It has a lot of character!

 

Byzantine Empire: Andronicus III Palaeologus (1328-1341) Æ Trachy, Thessalonica (Sear 2486; DOC 927-8; LPC 236.6; PCPC 271; Lianta-836)

Obv: ΓΑΙ to left; ΔΗΤ to right; Half-length figure of St. Demetrius, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic, breastplate and sagion; right hand holds spear; left hand holds shield
Rev: Three-quarter-length figure of bearded emperor wearing stemma, divistion, cruciger place and loros, holding in both hands large patriarchal cross

normal_Sear-2486(1).jpg

 

Very rare ones that are classified as anonymous:

Kingdom of Thessalonica: Anonymous (ca. mid 13th century) BI Trachy (Sear-2226; DOC IV, 1; Lianta 433-35)

Obv: Wing, from which extends an arm holding a sword; above and below a star
Rev: Full-length figure of emperor bearded on right, and of beardless, nimbate saint (Demetrius); between them partially sheathed sword, point downward; Emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar-piece and jeweled loros of simplified type; left hand holds scepter; Saint wears short military tunic, breastplate and sagion; right hand holds spear?; In upper center field a star

Sear-2226.jpg

 

Latin Rulers of Constantinople: Anonymous (1204-1261) Æ Trachy, Constantinople (Lianta 103-106; CLBC 11.31.1)

Obv: Full-length figure of beardless and nimbate saint wearing short military tunic, breastplate and sagion; right hand spear resting over shoulder; left hand holding shield; O/Δ/ΓI to left; O/C to right
Rev: Full-length figure of emperor, wearing stemma, divitision, collar-piece and paneled loros of simplified type; right hand holds trilobate scepter; left hand holds globus cruciger.

normal_Lianta-103.jpg

Those are some astonishing examples! I am very jealous of you, especially for the Sear 2226. 

 

The only examples of Sear 2486 I own are both badly chipped, like the following

IMG_7990.jpg

Of Sear 2089 I have a quite pleasing example with somewhat complete legends on the reverse:

PhotoRoom_20220527_130639.jpg

 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those are nice examples, especially the 2089.  Very pleasing indeed.  I have my fair share of pieces of trachaea, especially for some of the more scarce ones.  For instance,

Kingdom of Thessalonica: John Comnenus-Ducas (1237-1242) BI Trachy, Thessalonica (Sear-2211; DOC 25b)

Obv: IC XC in field; Cross on base, top of shaft formed by large, letter ᗺ
Rev: John, holding akakia, and St. Demetrius, holding sword, holding between them a long cross surmounted by pellet

normal_Sear-2211.JPG

 

Byzantine Empire: Michael VIII Palaeologus (1261-1282) Æ Trachy, Constantinople (Sear 2288; DOC 121; Lianta 567-68; Grierson 1369; Bendall-Donald C.28; PCPC 49)

Obv.: Large patriarchal cross with pelleted ends on floriate base
Rev.: Χ/Μ/ΔЄ/Π/ΤH to left, Ο/Π/Λ/C to right; Half-length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar-piece and panelled chlamys (?); right hand holds labarum-headed scepter; left hand holds globus cruciger; Manus Dei in upper right field

normal_Sear-2288.JPG

 

Here is another one that, while scarce, is difficult to get with a well-defined obverse. I have several of them, but this is the best strike I have seen for these:

Byzantine Empire: Andronicus II Palaeologus with Michael IX (1282-1328) Æ Trachy, Thessalonica Mint (Sear 2458; DOC 778-779; LPC 232.6; PCPC 235)

Obv: Two concentric circles bisected by vertical band
Rev: Three-quarter length figure of Andronicus II and of Michael IX, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and loros; between them haloed cross on long shaft. Both emperors hold in right and left hand respectively scepter cruciger

normal_Sear-2458(2).jpg

 

  • Like 5
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, seth77 said:

As for the 'Latin religious types' Metcalf discusses them in The Peter and Paul Hoard: Bulgarian and Latin Imitative Trachea in the Time of Ivan Asen II, NC Vol. 13 (1973) pp. 144-172.

I wouldn't take Metcalf too seriously on the source of the Latin Imitatives - the question is discussed (in tedious detail) here:

https://www.glebecoins.org/paleos/Articles/The_Bulgarian___Latin_Imitativ/the_bulgarian___latin_imitativ.html

Ross G.

  • Like 4
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my notes on the 'Latin types' I note both theories and I also use your research as reference for attribution and dating. 

11 hours ago, Glebe said:

I wouldn't take Metcalf too seriously on the source of the Latin Imitatives - the question is discussed (in tedious detail) here:

https://www.glebecoins.org/paleos/Articles/The_Bulgarian___Latin_Imitativ/the_bulgarian___latin_imitativ.html

Ross G.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/2/2022 at 5:59 AM, Zimm said:

Although not in amazing shape, this city tetarteron of Manuel caught my attention. When minted, the billon tetartera from Constantinople were given a silver wash, though the thin silver layer wore off quickly. Even though the silvering isn‘t perfectly preserved on this example either, it‘s better than on most

Very nice find, not only is it a harder coin to acquire (Because of the clean face it seems early in the reign.) but the silvering makes this a one in a million coin

Here is my example, nice detail, no silvering left, but it would still have some silver content.

1967.jpg.7b6dd0c6003ba9dca16c6f4cbbc23dab.jpg

1967 MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1967 DOC 14 CLBC 4.4.1

OBV Bust of Christ, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds scroll n in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and collar piece, and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. labarum on long shaft , and in l. Globus cruciger

Size 19mm

Weight 3.54gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. City issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

My nicest example, Both Christ and Manuel are depicted as young men.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.63mm to 4.8mm and sizes from 18mm to 20mm

The DOC numbers are accurate because no imitations of this type are known.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Simon said:

Very nice find, not only is it a harder coin to acquire (Because of the clean face it seems early in the reign.) but the silvering makes this a one in a million coin

Here is my example, nice detail, no silvering left, but it would still have some silver content.

1967.jpg.7b6dd0c6003ba9dca16c6f4cbbc23dab.jpg

1967 MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1967 DOC 14 CLBC 4.4.1

OBV Bust of Christ, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds scroll n in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and collar piece, and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. labarum on long shaft , and in l. Globus cruciger

Size 19mm

Weight 3.54gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. City issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

My nicest example, Both Christ and Manuel are depicted as young men.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.63mm to 4.8mm and sizes from 18mm to 20mm

The DOC numbers are accurate because no imitations of this type are known.

I had no idea silvered tetartera from Manuel's reign were that rare given how his trachea retain some silvering from time to time.

Also, the picture I initially posted here was one given by the seller, which was a bit misleading. The silvering is for sure there, but it isn't as silvery as that photo would have you believe (when you don't shine a light directly at it). I found out earlier this week that this coin is, in fact, used on Labarum.info, and the picture used there shows how the coin looks in normal lighting (i.e. under lighting that doesn't highlight the silvering).

Manuel I Comnenus (1143-1180) AE tetarteron Constantinople SB 1967

In hand the coin's appearance lies somewhere between the two photos. When no extra light is shone at it, it looks closer to the picture used on Labarum, and when a light is purposefully shone at it, it looks more similar to the seller's pictures


Also your tetarteron is in outstanding condition with virtually no flaws. Aside from the silvering, mine isn't in that great of a condition.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some more AE coins I bought recently:

1. Follaro of John VIII

unknown.png

Even though in awful condition, I can't complain as I found the coin in a group lot. Luckily you can still make out the legend, hence making the attribution possible as Sear 2568.

2. Trachy of Alexius & Alexius Asen (?)

IMG_7933.png

This one is in even more awful condition than the one above, but at the same time is far rarer. I found this one misdescribed in a budget auction as a "Islamic Imitation of an uncertain Byzantine coin". Even though it's in awful condition, for the price of 10€ I can't complain (and as a budget collector I doubt I would have been able to afford a proper example anytime soon).

 

3. A Latin Trachy In an Unusual Style

IMG_4993.jpg?width=1140&height=580

This one is the least impressive of the coins I've posted here thus far, but it does have an unusual portrait style. Unlike the usual example of Sear 2022 (which imitates Manuel's portraits), this one has a portrait more elongated than on average (with a forked beard?) and slimmer body proportions; features that you might see on Theodore I's coins. It also has quite an impressive flan and is quite hefty at 5.3g. 

Edited by Zimm
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Zimm You are doing outstanding for someone who is on a budget run, especially the follaro!  I noticed that Asen trachy as well. Surprised no one else picked that up! Since I already have two, I decided to forgo it.  Glad it went to a fellow NumisForum! 

 

Bulgaria: Alexios and John Asen (ca. 1356-1366) Æ Trachy (CNG E-288, lot 599; Numismatik Naumann Auction 75, Lot 872)

Obv: Two crowned figures standing facing, holding scepters; clouds above, three stars between
Rev: Brockage
Dim: 18mm, 2.01 g

Alexios and John Asen were scions of the Bulgarian royal house, who held a section of the Thracian coast as an independent fief during the turbulent reign of the Byzantine emperor John V. Site finds indicate these coins were struck in that area, and are not imperial Byzantine issues. Tentatively Attributed based on the following references:

Georganteli, E., A Palaiologan Trachion from the Dioikitiriou Square Excavation, Νομισματικα Ξρονικα 20
Bendall, S., The Dioikitirion Square Trachion Reconsidered, Νομισματικα Ξρονικα 21
Bendall, S., A Further Note on the ‘Dioikitirion Square’ Trachy, Νομισματικα Ξρονικα 23

Note that Dumbarton Oaks considers this "token" uncertain: https://www.doaks.org/resources/coins/catalogue/BZC.1960.88.4989

normal_AlexiosJohnAsen.jpg

 

Here is a scarce to rare one that doesn't come up that often. In fact, I have only seen two in any auction and I have the second one.  The first one hand an outstanding strike, albeit, a bit broken up:

 

Byzantine Empire: Michael VIII Palaeologos (1261-1282) Æ Trachy, Constantinople (Sear 2251; DOC V 37; PCPC 13)

Obv: Hetoimasia
Rev: Full-length figure of emperor on left, and of military saint; between them star on long shaft, at the end of which a globe; Emperor wears stemma, divitsion, paneled loros of simplified type and sagion; holds in right hand scepter cruciger; Saint wears short military tunic and sagion; holds sword point downward

normal_Sear-2251.jpg\

 

The Hetoimasia is the Throne of Preparation for Christ

Hetoimasia | The Throne of Preparation | A Reader's Guide to Orthodox Icons

 

Byzantine Empire: Andronicus II Palaeologus (1282-1328) Æ Trachy, Thessalonica (Sear 2359; DOC V.913-17; PCPC 263; LPC 204.1; Lianta 833)

Obv: Half-length figure of St. Michael, beardless and nimbate; right hand holds sword; left hand holds shield
Rev: ANΔ/PONI/KOC/ΔЄC/ΠΟ/Τ to left, IC/XC to right; Full-length figure of Christ, bearded and nimbate, on right, holding Gospel in left hand; places right hand on the head of the emperor crouching in proskynesis to left
Dim: 26.5mm, 2.13g

normal_Sear-2359(1).jpg

Edited by quant.geek
  • Like 7
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, quant.geek said:

@Zimm You are doing outstanding for someone who is on a budget run, especially the follaro!  I noticed that Asen trachy as well. Surprised no one else picked that up! Since I already have two, I decided to forgo it.  Glad it went to a fellow NumisForum! 

 

Bulgaria: Alexios and John Asen (ca. 1356-1366) Æ Trachy (CNG E-288, lot 599; Numismatik Naumann Auction 75, Lot 872)

Obv: Two crowned figures standing facing, holding scepters; clouds above, three stars between
Rev: Brockage
Dim: 18mm, 2.01 g

Alexios and John Asen were scions of the Bulgarian royal house, who held a section of the Thracian coast as an independent fief during the turbulent reign of the Byzantine emperor John V. Site finds indicate these coins were struck in that area, and are not imperial Byzantine issues. Tentatively Attributed based on the following references:

Georganteli, E., A Palaiologan Trachion from the Dioikitiriou Square Excavation, Νομισματικα Ξρονικα 20
Bendall, S., The Dioikitirion Square Trachion Reconsidered, Νομισματικα Ξρονικα 21
Bendall, S., A Further Note on the ‘Dioikitirion Square’ Trachy, Νομισματικα Ξρονικα 23

Note that Dumbarton Oaks considers this "token" uncertain: https://www.doaks.org/resources/coins/catalogue/BZC.1960.88.4989

normal_AlexiosJohnAsen.jpg

 

Here is a scarce to rare one that doesn't come up that often. In fact, I have only seen two in any auction and I have the second one.  The first one hand an outstanding strike, albeit, a bit broken up:

 

Byzantine Empire: Michael VIII Palaeologos (1261-1282) Æ Trachy, Constantinople (Sear 2251; DOC V 37; PCPC 13)

Obv: Hetoimasia
Rev: Full-length figure of emperor on left, and of military saint; between them star on long shaft, at the end of which a globe; Emperor wears stemma, divitsion, paneled loros of simplified type and sagion; holds in right hand scepter cruciger; Saint wears short military tunic and sagion; holds sword point downward

normal_Sear-2251.jpg\

 

The Hetoimasia is the Throne of Preparation for Christ

Hetoimasia | The Throne of Preparation | A Reader's Guide to Orthodox Icons

 

Byzantine Empire: Andronicus II Palaeologus (1282-1328) Æ Trachy, Thessalonica (Sear 2359; DOC V.913-17; PCPC 263; LPC 204.1; Lianta 833)

Obv: Half-length figure of St. Michael, beardless and nimbate; right hand holds sword; left hand holds shield
Rev: ANΔ/PONI/KOC/ΔЄC/ΠΟ/Τ to left, IC/XC to right; Full-length figure of Christ, bearded and nimbate, on right, holding Gospel in left hand; places right hand on the head of the emperor crouching in proskynesis to left
Dim: 26.5mm, 2.13g

normal_Sear-2359(1).jpg

Those are wonderful examples. Sear 2251 has been one of my favourite types ever since I started collecting trachea, but the type has eluded me so far, so seeing you have one definitely makes me jealous 😅.

Here is quite an interesting one I've yet to post here. Unlike the other unpublished type, which I was ultimately unable to confidently narrow to a single emperor (or rather a pair of emperors), this one has a portrait so distinctive of John III that you can't mistake it for anyone else.

unknown.png

John III Vatatzes (1222-1254) - AE Trachy - Uncertain mint (Sear: -, DOC: -, LBC: -)

Obv: Full-lenght figure of Mary, nimbate, seated upon throne with back, holding head of Christ on breast. [MP - ϴV]

Rev: Half-lenght figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and loros; holding labarum-headed sceptre in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand. [Unclear legend, if present]

 

Here is second type which I for long believed to also be unpublished, but which I ended up finding in LBC later:

John III Vatatzes (1222-1254) - AE Trachy - Uncertain mint (Sear:-, DOC:-, LBC: 278-280)

Bild

Obv: Half-length figure of Christ, nimbate, holding Book of Gospels. IC - XC

Rev: Full-length figure of emperor on left, wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys, holding uncertain sceptre in right hand, uncertain saint on right, nimbate, wearing stemma, divitision, and loros, holding cruciform sceptre in left hand; figures holding globus cruciger between one another. [Uncertain legend]

 

Edited by Zimm
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sear 2095, perhaps. I have a few of them and the clothes on the emperor are sometimes different...

 

Empire of Nicaea: John III Ducas-Vatazes (1222-1254) Æ Trachy, Thessalonica Mint (Sear 2095; DOC IV, 41)

Obv: MP - ΘV in upper field; Virgin nimbate, seated upon throne with back; holds beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast
Rev: IШ OΔϪKAC in two columnar groups, Full-length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar-piece, jeweled loros of simplified type and sagion; right hand holds labarum-headed scepter; left hand holds globus cruciger; Star often on sagion to left or right (or both)

 

normal_Sear-2095.jpg

 

normal_Sear-2095(1).jpg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, quant.geek said:

Sear 2095, perhaps. I have a few of them and the clothes on the emperor are sometimes different...

 

Empire of Nicaea: John III Ducas-Vatazes (1222-1254) Æ Trachy, Thessalonica Mint (Sear 2095; DOC IV, 41)

Obv: MP - ΘV in upper field; Virgin nimbate, seated upon throne with back; holds beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast
Rev: IШ OΔϪKAC in two columnar groups, Full-length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar-piece, jeweled loros of simplified type and sagion; right hand holds labarum-headed scepter; left hand holds globus cruciger; Star often on sagion to left or right (or both)

 

normal_Sear-2095.jpg

 

normal_Sear-2095(1).jpg

Yes, that does seem to be a very similar type and I came across it while researching the type, though they are quite different. The main differences between that type and the one I have are as follows:

1. On my example the bust is clearly a half-length one as opposed to the full-length one seen on that example (and all other examples of the type), which is how it's described in all reference books. (Note the bust taking up almost all of the flan, stretching all the way from the left side to the right one, and the bust not extending below the emperor's waist. Also, as on most half-length bust types, the face itself is far more detailled when compared to full-length busts).

2. Although similar, the throne Mary is seated upon is different. The panels on the back of the throne have a very different design when compared to the example I have.

3.  The style on the obverse is very different. The regalia (which, like you said, even differs in the type portrayed), the face and the bust as a whole are of very different style than the usual Sear 2095.

I personally think that makes the coin different enough to be considered an unpublished type.

Edited by Zimm
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a coin that I managed to win in an auction earlier this week:

unknown.png

Manuel Komnenos Doukas - Sear 2177 - Thessalonica

Obverse: St. Demetrius, nimbate, wearing tunic and breastplate, holding spear in right hand and hilt of sword in left.

Reverse: Full-length figure of emperor on left, wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys, holding sceptre in right hand and akakia in left, crowned by Christ on right, nimbate, holding Book of Gospels.

Edited by Zimm
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...