Jump to content

Roerbakmix

Member
  • Posts

    145
  • Joined

  • Last visited

3 Followers

Recent Profile Visitors

393 profile views

Roerbakmix's Achievements

Community Regular

Community Regular (8/14)

  • Reacting Well
  • One Year In
  • Very Popular
  • One Month Later
  • Collaborator

Recent Badges

799

Reputation

  1. A Roman Scalpellus (scalpel) This part of what once was a Roman scalpel was gifted to me by a metal detectorist living in Limburg, the most Southern province of the Netherlands with a rich Roman history. I'm a moderator on a metal detectoring forum (www.bodemvondstenwereld.nl), where I moderate the section on sceattas. I bought a large number of Celtic coins from him, and somewhere, I must have told him that I'm a medical doctor, because he sent me this cool find of him. Roman scalpel (scalpellus). Bronze, with silver inlays. Iron remains of the blade, clasped in the bronze handle. Weight 21.94g, dimensions 45.6 x 11.4 x 8.2 mm. It's very similar to this Roman Scalpel, found in Ficarolo (Italy), showing similar silver inlays: Intact, the scalpel might have looked like this (second one): A fresco in Pompeii, showing the use of the scalpel (this scalpel? Who knows!)
  2. The collection of antiquities of @DonnaML and others inspired me to photograph my very modest collection. A very local find: a 'Lakenlood' from Leiden, found in Leiden The first one is a so called 'lakenlood', literally translated as cloth lead, made and found in the Dutch city Leiden. In the 16th and 17th century, Leiden was famous for its textile industry. Thousands of textile workers from the Southern Netherlands, England, Germany and France, who had had to leave their countries on political or religious grounds, found employment in Leiden and contributed to its success. In the seventeenth century, Leiden cloth found its way onto the world market through Amsterdam. In the same way, raw materials such as wool, cotton, silk and colorants arrived in Leiden from South Europe, Asia and North and South America. Thousands of men, women and children manufactured the famous Leiden cloth in a home industry system. In order to guarantee the quality, the city's administration founded seven inspection halls for various types of fabric. The Laecken-Halle (Cloth Hall) that was founded in 1641, was the most significant hall. To guarantee the quality, the exported cloth was tested in the Laecken-Halle, a richly decorated building, showcasing the success of the textile industry in Leiden. The building has been converted to the city museum (Leiden, the city with one of the oldest universities of Europe, by the way, has a relatively large number of museums: the 'rijksmuseum van oudheden' (national museum of antiquities), with an impressive Egyptian collection, 'Naturalis' (natural history), 'Boerhave museum' (a museum on the history of science, named after Hermanus Boerhave, the founding father of modern medicine), the 'Siebold huis' (a museum on the relations between the Netherlands and Japan), the 'volkenkundig museum' (National Museum of Ethnology), and the 'anatomisch museum', a local collection of the Faculty of Medicine, which is not open to public (but, as an alumnus on that faculty, I had the privilege to visit it multiple times). Earlier, Leiden also housed the national coin collection, but unfortunately, that collection is now stored safely away in a vault somewhere. The 'Museum de Lakenhal' houses an impressive collection of Dutch Masters, including Rembrandt, Lucas van Leyden, Gerrit Dou, Jan Steen, and others. It has recently been renovated and expanded. It's well worth a visit. The quality of the textile, ready for export, was guaranteed with the Lakenlood, usually giving some information on where the cloth was produced (other Dutch cities followed the success of Leiden), the quality, and sometimes the year or date. It was also in Leiden where I found this lakenlood: Lead 'lakenlood' ('cloth lead'), one side showing a decorated shield with the text "DOUBLE STAEL GEBLAUT". Near the "L" of "STAEL", there is a small numeric 10. The other side blank. Diameter: 60 mm, weight: 58.74g. Registration in the Dutch PAN system pending. Found in 2014, in Leiden, near the banks of the river 'de Mare'. On the reverse, you can actually see the imprint of the texture in the lead: Interestingly, when I visited the Museum back in 2015/16, I found the actual stamp that had been used to make this cloth lead. It has been photographed recently: As for the text, I'm still unsure what "DOUBEL STAEL GEBLAUT" means. It has also been used on leads from other cities, and probably has to do with the quality of the textile. Perhaps someone here knows enough about the cloth industry to make an educated guess. Meanwhile, even though I've moved away from Leiden (though not very far away), I'm very happy with this 'Leideny' piece of history!
  3. Very nice! I would like a Viking or Anglo-Saxon artifact, but am wary about the many fakes that are around (as @DonnaMLpointed out). I do have one artifact that is somewhat relevant I think, even though it's not Viking. It's a pseud-coin fibula, likely from a local craftsman from the coastal region of the North Sea in the Netherlands. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: Pewter Pseudo-coin fibula (Pseudo-coin fibula), minted: Frisian / Carolingian; 9th-10th century Obv: EVO[??]DVS, bust to right Rev: Incuse of obverse Weight: 10.53g; Ø:34 mm. Catalogue: NA. Provenance: From Hollandia Numismatics, who bought it from finder. ; acq.: 07-2022 Find location: Zeeland, the Netherlands Published: Numis: 1167868 Derived from a Carolingian Solidus of the MVNVS DIVINVM type, placing the dating to the 9th or 10th century. The artifact was discussed in depth, and compared with mould-identical examples here:
  4. Thank you @Di Nomos! My wife just pointed out (so she does read my posts) that I forgot to include a #5 🙂
  5. Having just purchased my 100th sceatta, 2023 has been a productive year for my collection. A total of 44 new coins have been added, and though I wasn't able to keep the net balance at zero (I challenge myself keeping a neutral balance. I believe this keeps the collection healthy by selling coins that are not in the scope.) my entire collection has now cost me the grand sum of €875 in total. I now have 100 sceattas, 4 tremisses/thrymsas, 2 Saxon pennies, a Merovingian denier, and a Carolingian denier - thus a total of 108 coins. Another four sceattas are currently between the UK and the Netherlands, one of which will probably be featured in my top 2024. Sceattas are traditionally stylistically and chronologically categorized in series (Series A, B, C, D, E, etc.), which are subdivided in BMC types (Series D BMC 2c, 8, 10, etc). The relatively recent publication of Sceatta List by Tony Abramson expands on this, identifying > 500 different sceatta types stylistically categorized in Sceatta List numbers (SL). I'm constant on the lookout for new varieties, and this (hopefully) is reflected in this top 10: I've decided to present my coins a bit different than in the previous year. There are no 10 coins: instead, I'll present the most interesting additions in the context of the series (outlined in most cases with yellow squares around the coins). #10 - the VERNVS group. VERNVS sceattas are considered early primary phase. I have added three of these in 2023 (highlighted by the yellow box). They have resemblance to Series A. I posted a detailed thread on this coin type here. In short, there are two theories regarding the progression of the obverse. Blackburn suggests an increase in abstraction, i.e. a clear bust progressing into a more abstract one, whereas Metcalf and Op den Velde propose an exact opposite. Intuitively, I'm inclined to agree with the theory by Blackburn, and have posted my five VERNVS varieties using his chronology (which, incidentally, is also the exact chronology of acquisition). Coin 1 (upper left): Magna Frisia (695-710, Frisia) Weight: 1.20g; Ø:11 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 6-10; die-matched obv die chain 3463-5 JMP 2009/2010. acq.: 12-2020 Ex. iNumis 05-03-2019; acquired 14-12-2020. Discussed here in more detail. Coin 2 (upper right): Magna Frisia (695-710, Frisia) Weight: 1.1g; Ø:11.1 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 6-10; die-matched to obv die chain 3463-5 JMP 2009/2010. acq.: 05-2021 Bought from Johan Wiersma. Found near Barham, Mid Suffolk, UK on 01-03-2011 PAS SF-D712D2 Discussed in more detail here. Coin 3 (middle left): Magna Frisia (695-710, Frisia) Weight: 0.93g; Ø:10.2 mm. Catalogue: Not in JMP 2009/10. acq.: 01-2023 Elsen auction 153, lot 798 Coin 4 (middle right): Magna Frisia (695-710, Frisia) Weight: 1.11g; Ø:11.4 mm. Catalogue: Not in JMP 2009/10. acq.: 01-2023 Ex. Noonans 28-09-2022 lot 1638. Bought from ebay seller Fortuna Numismatics, ID: 314240755272 Coin 5 (lower left): Magna Frisia (695-715/720) Weight: 10.2g; Ø:1.1 mm. Catalogue: Not in JMP 2009/10. acq.: 03-2023 Ex. Noonans auction 13-07-2022, lot 57, Ex. Victor Parson 03-2023 #9 A splendid Herstal sceatta. In June, I was very successful in a regional auction where a small collection of high-grade sceattas had been consigned. It received little attention of the international public, probably because it appeared relatively late on Numisbids. I discussed the Herstal type back in 2020 at Cointalk (a different coin, but the same type). See here. In short, the Herstal is a bit of an 'orphan sceatta' (and listed as such in the Abramson Sceatta List). It's substantially larger than the average sceatta - 13-14 mm vs. 10-11 mm. It copies the hexagon design of a Merovingian denier from Reims. Yet, a large proportion of the Franeker hoard, found in the 19th century near this Frisian city, consisted of this type confirming that this type circulated in the Frisian region in the early secondary phase. This Herstal sceatta is in superb condition with a nice patina, showing little to no wear. Interestingly, it sold for less than in Kunker 2005. I'm sure it must have an older provenance. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Hexagon or 'Herstal' type), minted: Frisia Magna or Austrasia; 715-750 Obv: Cross within Star of David-like design; pellets around Rev: Central cross with radiating lines around and cross above Weight: 1.31g; Ø:13.2 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 109.10; Metcalf p. 256–8; SCBI –; EMC 2001.1261; North –; SCBC 796.. Provenance: • Ex. Künker auction 105, lot 1975 (27-09-2005) • Ex. Henzen List 173/951 • Ex. AA muntenveiling auction 62 (17-06-2023); acq.: 06-2023 #8 A series B with a certain archaic style Series B is not my favorite series. The coins look very much alike: a diademed bust on the obverse, and a bird on a cross on the reverse. The series is attributed to Kent, and the little variety of the design suggests some form of standardization which is unusual for sceattas. This specific coin is different: it does show the typical diademed bust, but there is a cross (which is not unusual), and a pelleted circle which might resemble the sun. It was found in France, and I know of only two others with a similar design: both sold by CNG, one of those a doubble die match to mine. I really like this coin - it's really crowded and in my opinion may may be the prototype for the series. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series BIb, type 27b), minted: Mint in Essex or East Anglia; c 685-700 Obv: Diademed head to right, cross before, pelleted jewel before Rev: Bird on cross to right, surrounded with annulets and dots, within dotted ouroboros (serpent eating its own tail). Weight: 1.09g; Ø:12 mm. Catalogue: Not in Sceatta list. Provenance: Bought from Finder (Raphael Seillier); acq.: 10-2023 Published: To be published in Sceatta List IV #7 a superb example of series Bz Staying close to series B. It's a type I haven't research much. It was on my wish list however, because of the Christ like figure (?) on the reverse, showing resemblance to Edvard Munch's The Scream. It's a well centered example with good toning, and it was part of the same collection as #9 (of which I could track down the provenance to 2005) - this coin probably has an older provenance as well. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series Bz, type 29b), minted: Essex or East Anglia; 700-710 Obv: •VV++•++ΛI, rudimentary facing head of Christ Rev: Bird standing right upon cross; unclear legend around. Weight: 1.2g; Ø:10.9 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 17-10. Provenance: Ex. Elsen liste 239 lot 366 Ex. AA muntenveiling auction 62 (17-06-2023); acq.: 06-2023 #6 an expansion to my plumed bird flock. Plumed bird sceattas - a subgroup of the primary phase (695-715) continental Series E are probably my favorite varieties. I added two plumed birds - upper row right, second row left. A third one is currently traveling from the UK to the Netherlands – perhaps in the opposite direction it traveled 1400 years ago. Coin 1 (upper left): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, variety K. Frisia (695-715/720) Weight: 1.25g; Ø:11.6 mm. Catalogue: No die match in JMP 2010. acq.: 04-2021 Ex. Hollandia Numismatics Coin 2 (upper right): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, uncertain variety. Frisia (695-715/720) Weight: 1.12g; Ø:12.3 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 87-30. acq.: 10-2023 Coin 3 (second row, left): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, variety J. Frisia (695-715/720) Weight: 1.2g; Ø:11.9 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 87-30. acq.: 10-2023 Via Ebay (freedomsearchers14, ID 335042886566) Coin 4 (second row, right): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, variety J. Frisia (695-715/720) Weight: 0.68g; Ø:12 mm. Catalogue: JMP 2009/2010, die chain 8-10. acq.: 11-2019 Bought from J.T.M. van Bergen Coin 5 (third row, left): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, variety L. "Frisia (695-715/720) Weight: 1.17g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: SL 87-10 No die match in JMP 2009/2010 . acq.: 04-2021 Ex. 51 Gallery (auction 30-05-2014) lot 176 [Hammer 250] Ex iNumis (auction 42, lot 190, 05.06.2018)" Coin 6 (third row, right): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, variety L. "Frisia (695-715/720) Weight: 1g; Ø:12 mm. Catalogue: SL 87-10 No die match JMP 2009/2010. acq.: 11-2019 Bought from J. Wiersma, who bought it from the finder in 2018" Coin 7 (fourth row, left): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, uncertain variety (mule). Frisia (Uncertain date) Weight: 0.86g; Ø:13 mm. Catalogue: Unique, unreported variety. acq.: 12-2020 Bought from H. de Jong Coin 8 (fourth row, right): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, uncertain variety (mule). Frisia magna (690-750 AD) Weight: 0.32g; Ø:9.3 mm. Catalogue: Not in JMP 2009/2010. acq.: 10-2022 Bought from Le Numis d'or, Ebay (ID 185594493974) Coin 9 (fifth row, left): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, uncertain variety (mule, rev. sub-variety E). Frisia (Uncertain date) Weight: 0.63g; Ø:11 mm. Catalogue: Die match to JMP 2009/2010 corpus 164. acq.: 12-2020 Bought from H. Eeuwe Coin 10 (fifth row, right): Series E, primary phase, plumed bird type, uncertain variety. Frisia Magna (690-715 AD) Weight: 1.02g; Ø:10.9 mm. Catalogue: . acq.: 10-2022 Bought on Ebay from Yamushi, Ebay nr: 195378840092 #4 A large variety of ‘porcupines’ Series E is super diverse. In 2009 and 2010, Metcalf and Op den Velde published their attempt to organize the series, dividing the series in a primary, secondary and tertiary phase based on hoard evidence and style. Coins from the secondary phase are especially difficult to put in a group. This probably reflects how these coins were minted back in the 700s: there was little standardization, and it is assumed that that merchants coined their silver at local silversmiths. I have added 15 coins from series E (not including the plumed birds above, which are also part of this series). AR Sceatta (Series E, primary phase, variety D), minted: Frisia; 695-715/720 Obv: Quilled crescent or 'porcupine' with small V (both ends attached to spine); spine ending in annulet. Two dots below spine; part of cross-pommee below Rev: Central annulet flanked with four pellets, within (small) dotted square, garbled legend outside Weight: 11.9g; Ø:1.13 mm. Catalogue: Obverse and reverse die match to JMP 2009/2010 675-676 (found in Coddenham, and Aston Rowant respectively). Provenance: Ex. Noonans auction 13-07-2022, lot 56 Ex. Victor Parson 03-2023; acq.: 03-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, primary phase, variety G3), minted: Frisia; 680-715 AD Obv: Quilled crescent curved right, part of large Z below Rev: Square standard of line with dots, inside pellet within annulet, horizontal line above and below ending in dots on each side. Weight: 1.23g; Ø:11.6 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 89-30. Provenance: Ex. Elsen auction 156, lot 774; acq.: 09-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, primary phase, variety G3), minted: Frisia; 680-715 AD Obv: Quilled crescent to the right, large letters ZA below Rev: Square standard of line with dots, inside pellet within annulet, horizontal line above and below ending in dots on each side. Weight: 1g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 89-30. acq.: 07-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, primary phase, variety G3 ), minted: Frisia; 695-715/720 Obv: Quilled crescent or 'porcupine' with sharp V (only proximal end attached to spine); distal part of spine ending with in two pellets. Parts of letters Z and O below, largely off-flan. Rev: Beaded standard with central pellet-within annulet, flanked by pellets and horizontal lines, all within dotted square border. Pellets and cross-pommee outside Weight: 1.16g; Ø:11.6 mm. Catalogue: . Provenance: Ex. Lockdales auction 135, 14/05/2016, lot 1359 Ex. Hanson auction 26/08/2021, lot 370 Ex. Victor Parson 03-2023; acq.: 03-2023 Find location: Unknown Published: No AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety b), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent or 'porcupine' with five vertical lines below spine Rev: TToII within standard Weight: 0.88g; Ø:12.7 mm. Catalogue: acq.: 10-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety D), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent or 'porcupine' with three vertical lines below spine (one attached to distal end) Rev: TToII within standard Weight: 0.89g; Ø:13.1 mm. acq.: 10-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent to the right, four lines below, horizontal line below Rev: central annulet flanked by abstract figures (horizontally minored) Weight: 0.65g; Ø:10.8 mm. acq.: 07-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety i), minted: Frisia; c. 710-750 AD Obv: Quilled crescent or 'porcupine' to the right, four lines below, one dot, triangle and annulet below Rev: Central annulet, within square, within square, outside three dots on each side, within circle Weight: 1.09g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: Not in JMP 2010. Provenance: Ex Schulman fixed price sale; acq.: 12-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k (left faced variety)), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent to the left, triangle beak, zig-zag line below Rev: TToII reverse with tufa Weight: 0.51g; Ø:10.6 mm. Catalogue: Obv. and rev. die match to JMP 2009/2010 die chain 2692-2694; acq.: 07-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k (left faced variety)), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent to the left, cross-pommee below, large H and pellets Rev: Central pellet-within-annulet, four dots around, all within (small) dotted circle, cross outside. Weight: 0.6g; Ø:10.5 mm. Catalogue: Not in JMP 2009/2010; acq.: 10-2023 Reverse similar to primary phase var. D. Crude style of the obverse suggests an imitation. Minor deposits on obverse. AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent to the right, four lines below Rev: Elaborate standard, central pellet-within-annulet, flanked by lines in swatsika-pattern, within dotted border, four pellet-within-annulets outside Weight: 0.96g; Ø:11.3 mm. Catalogue: No die match in JMP 2009/2010. acq.: 07-2023 Published: To be included in SL IV AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent to the right, triangle beak (not attached to spine), pellet inside, anulet below, large barred I Rev: Central annulet, flanked by a square dotted border, within square, tufa outside Weight: 0.91g; Ø:11.8 mm. Catalogue: Similar, but not identical, to JMP 2009/2010 die-chain 2319-20. acq.: 07-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent above pellet-outlined dolphin shape with central band, bars below. Rev: Central annulet, four diagonal bars, pellets between, within dotted square Weight: 0.97g; Ø:11.9 mm. Catalogue: SL 100-20. No die match in JMP 2009/2010. Reverse similar to 2614-20. acq.: 10-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent or 'porcupine' with three vertical lines below spine (one attached to distal end) Rev: Saltire cross with large central annulet, within square dotted border, flanked by pellets. Weight: 0.96g; Ø:11.4 mm. Catalogue: Obverse and reverse die-match to JMP 2009/2010 2631-2632,( Domburg and De Meern). Provenance: Ex. Victor Parsons 03-2023; acq.: 03-2023 AR Sceatta (Series E, stepped cross var), minted: Frisia; 690-715 AD Obv: Porcupine' head to the right, spikes ending in dot. Beak connected to spine, but not at distal end. Dot within beak. Annulet under spine; several dots around. Rev: Stepped cross with pellet-in-annulet at center and pellets around between arms of the cross Weight: 0.82g; Ø:11.3 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 91-10. acq.: 10-2023 #4 WIGRAED, or three WIGRAEDs. Wigraed sceattas – named after the Runic name of (probably) the moneyer on the obverse – are part of series R, specifically R10. They mark the end of the sceatta age, apparent for this reason (apart from the similar TILBERT R11 sceattas, no other sceatta bears the name of a moneyer), and because of the poor alloy containing almost no silver at all. I have discussed the Wigraed in detail here, and confirmed the East England mint, probably in Suffolk. The sceatta above was one of my first sceattas, the other two were bought this year. Coin 1: EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series R10 (Wigraed)), minted: East Anglia, uncertain mint; c. 710-750 AD Obv: Radiate bust of crude style right, annulet either side of head, runic ""WIGR"", before, ΛO and pellets behind, wearing collared drapery Rev: Beaded degenerate standard containing symmetrical geometric symbols, central annulet, cross pommée to each side, diagonals at outer corners Weight: 0.72g; Ø:11 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 11.150 Chris Timms obverse group 1, subgroun 2. Reverse group 2. . Provenance: Coin fair Houten; bought from E. Datema; acq.: 09-2020 Coin 2: EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series R10 (Wigraed)), minted: East Anglia, uncertain mint; c. 710-750 AD Obv: Radiate bust of crude style right, annulet either side of head, runic ""WIGR"", before, ΛO and pellets behind, wearing collared drapery Rev: Beaded degenerate standard Weight: 0.71g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 11.150 Chris Timms Obv. group 3, subgroup 1. Reverse group 1. Provenance: Found by Charles Brown Ex. Victor Parsons 05-2023; acq.: 05-2023 Find location: Found near Kings Lynn, Norfolk Published: EMC 2023.0530 Coin 3: EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series R10 (Wigraed)), minted: East Anglia, uncertain mint; c. 710-750 AD Obv: Radiate bust of crude style right, annulet either side of head, runic ""WIGR"", before, ΛO and pellets behind, wearing collared drapery Rev: Beaded degenerate standard Weight: 0.67g; Ø:11.9 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 11.150 Chris Timms Obv. group 3, subgroup 1. Reverse group 1. Provenance: Found by Charles Brown, sold to David Jenner, and bought from him. ; acq.: 11-2023 Find location: Downham Market, Norfolk Published: EMC 2023.0503. #3 the transition from thrymsa to sceatta. The PADA thrymsa is a transitional type from the early primary phase, when the gold thrymsas were minted with increasingly lower gold and higher silver contents. The coins aren’t particularly rare, but they are sought after especially those in gold. I missed a spectacular PADA one in October, which sold for way too low on Facebook, so when a corroded and uncleaned example was offered cheaply I bought it as placeholder. I gave it a clean, and am happy with the results: the runes on the reverse are clearly legible and the bust is very typical for the issue. AV Thrysma (PADA, PaIII, type 97), minted: Kent; c.665/70-670/5 Obv: Diademed bust right, jewel before, row of pellets behind head, square drapery, legend NV/vNI [?] surrounding Rev: Plain central cross, annulets in quarters, within beaded circle, part Runic legend reads PADA in runes Weight: 0.84g; Ø:11 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 1-50. acq.: 10-2023 #2 two extremely rare series J types. Series J is attributed to East Anglia. The series has some similarities with series B, especially types 85 (see below). There are two subtypes that are extremely rare: a reverse variety of type 36 (two examples known, of which I now own one), and type 60 (three examples known, idem). I also bought an upgrade to my type 37 – a subtype that usually is poorly minted and very often plated or debased. In the photo below, all my series J sceattas are grouped: first, the normal type 36 showing a diademed bust on the obverse, holding a cross. The reverse shows a bird – possibly a peace dove given the Christian symbolic, again flanked by a cross. A small bird is depicted above. The type 36 variety shows a similar obverse, but now, the bird is bitten by a snail. This variety is extremely rare, with the only other example in the Tony Abramson collection (a double die match). The two rows below shows the common type 37: two facing busts on the obverse, and a group of birds flying right. These three coins all have their issues: weak spots (coin 1), corrosion (coin 2), and an off-center one in good silver (coin 3). Together, they represent type 37: common to find, but difficult to get in good condition. I’m still looking for a decent example. On the third row, I have included another rarity (only three examples known): type 60. The bust is very similar to type 85 (row 4 and 5) and series B, but the reverse is unique with two snakes / serpents coiled around each other, their heads facing. The coin is excessively rare, and though it has its issues, I’m happy to have included it! The row below shows a coin similar to type 37: two facing busts on the obverse, and an abstracted bird fighting a snake or serpent with its mouth wide open. The tail of this serpent forms the dotted circle around the bird. It’s a relatively scarce type. Finally, marking the end of the series, two coins of type 85. Note the similarity between series B, especially on the second coin. Coin 1 (upper left): AR Sceatta (Series J, type 36), minted: Anglia; 710-760 Obv: Crude diademed bust right, prominent lips, pelleted wreath ties behind, serpent before coiled in figure-of-eight. Rev: Two birds, possibly eagles, right, one in foreground with splayed feet and three tail feathers. Coiled serpent before Weight: 0.57g; Ø:11.5 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 20-10 (N). acq.: 10-2023 Coin 2 (upper right): AR Sceatta (Series J, type 36 (var)), minted: Anglia; 710-760 Obv: Crude diademed bust right, prominent lips, pelleted wreath ties behind, serpent before coiled in figure-of-eight. Rev: Two birds, possibly eagles, right, one in foreground with splayed feet and three tail feathers. Coiled serpent before Weight: 0.92g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 20-40 (PU). acq.: 10-2023 Coin 3 (second row left): AR Sceatta (Series J, type 37), minted: Mint in Northumbria; 710-725 AD Obv: Two confronted diademed heads; between, long cross with trident end; double border Rev: Cross, at each end a bird right; double border. Weight: 0.84g; Ø:11 mm. Catalogue: SL 19-30. Provenance: Ex Heritage Auctions Europe, 20-11-2020, lot 11369; acq.: 11-2020 Coin 4 (second row right): AR Sceatta (Series J, type 37), minted: Mint in Northumbria; 710-725 AD Obv: Two confronted diademed heads; between, long cross with trident end; double border Rev: Cross, at each end a bird right; double border. Weight: 0.93g; Ø:12.2 mm. Catalogue: SL 19-30. acq.: 07-2023 Coin 5 (third row left): AR Sceatta (Series J, type 37), minted: Mint in Northumbria; 710-725 AD Obv: Two confronted diademed heads; between, long cross with trident end; double border Rev: Cross, at each end a bird right; double border. Weight: 0.89g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: SL 19-30. acq.: 10-2023 Coin 6 (third row right): AR Sceatta (Series J, type 60), minted: Anglia; 710-760 Obv: Crude diademed head right, crescent ear, pellet lips protruding or receding, braided hair. Rev: Crude diademed head right, crescent ear, pellet lips protruding or receding, braided hair. Weight: 0.62g; Ø:11.9 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 18-10 (ER). acq.: 10-2023 Coin 7 (fourth row left): AR Sceatta (Series J, type 72), minted: Northumbria (probably York); 710-725 Obv: Two crude diademed busts facing one another; cruciform trident between Rev: Fantastic bird (eagle?) right, looking left, encircled by gaping, serpent-headed, worm with open mouth and beaded body Weight: 0.85g; Ø:13.0x10.8 mm. Catalogue: SL 19-10. Coin 8 (fourth row right) AR Sceatta (Series J, type 85), minted: Anglo-Saxon; 710-725, York Obv: Diademed head right, double strand pearl diadem Rev: A bird on a cross, pellets in field in front of bird and below horizontal bar on the cross; annulets at the ends of the horizontal arms, beaded inner circle Weight: 0.98g; Ø:10.8 mm. Catalogue: SL 18-20 (c). Provenance: Ex iNumis (shop, 27-04-2021) Ex iNumis (Auction 42, lot 191, 05.06.2018) Ex Gallery 51 (May auction, lot 185, 30.05.2014),; acq.: 04-2021 Coin 9 (lowest) AR Sceatta (Series J, type 85), minted: Anglo-Saxon; 710-725, York Obv: Diademed head right, double strand pearl diadem Rev: A bird on a cross, pellets in field in front of bird and below horizontal bar on the cross; annulets at the ends of the horizontal arms, beaded inner circle Weight: 0.88g; Ø:11.6 mm. Catalogue: SL 18-20 (c). acq.: 07-2022 #1 Madelinus of Dorestad. I bought my third Frisian tremissis in 2023 – an iconic and much sought after tremissis of Madelinus. I have posted a detailed write-up of this Merovingian moneyer here. In short, Madelinus first minted his coins in the Merovingian city Maastricht (the very historic capital of the Dutch province Limburg), and then moved to Dorestatvs: Dorestad or Wijk bij Duurstede a thriving trade city on the border of the Merovingian and Frisian empire. Madelinus’ coins were widely imitated, so called ‘pseudo-madelinus’ as is this coin. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AV Tremissis (Pseudo-MADELINUS (Frisian immitative) type), minted: Frisia; 630-650 AD Obv: Degraded diademed bust right, with pointy nose and pellet lips. ∇°REഗTɅT FIT (DORESTAT FIT; Delta D, upper-case o, sideway rotated S, unbarred A). Three pellets between R and E Rev: MɅ∇ELINVS M (MADELINVS M; unbarred A, delta D), cross on single step, six equidistant pellets below. Weight: 1.26g; Ø:15 mm. Catalogue: . Provenance: Ex. Elsen auction 130 (10-09-2016), lot nr. 291 (unsold) Ex. Hollandia Numismatics 05-2023 Find location: Unknown Published: Included in Arent Pol's (unpublished) study on Madelinus tremisses. The gold content of this coin was measured for Arent Pol's (unpublished) study on Madelinus tremisses, using specific gravity (gold content of 44%, assuming pure silver/gold alloy) and XRF (Bruker method, 69-70% gold content). Small abrasion on the obverse (at the cheek), apart from that, a superb example.
  6. Thank you all for the suggestions. I'll look into SQL and Numishare.
  7. Thank you @Coinmaster for the suggestion. I have discussed this with Simon Coupland, but alas, he's convinced it's not Carolingian.
  8. As my area of interest is fairly focussed (I collect sceattas only, small silver coins minted between 685-750 AD), I have been playing with the thought of building a dataset of all sceattas that have been sold, found, or are in public collections. I estimate the total number of coins in this dataset at ~ 7500-10.000 (there are about 4500 sceattas on ACsearch alone). To keep it manageable, I would like to extract the following: a photo of the coin weight diameter find location (if known) description of the auction house / venue. This will allow me to add more fields later (such as auction, lot, provenance, etc). I will manually fill in the following: the ID of the coin (e.g. Series X type 31) This is of course a lot of work. I plan to use this database for (a) finding provenance, (b) research, e.g. die studies, mapping find locations, etc. As the databases uses photo's and text, some with copyright, I intend to use this database for private use. I am looking for the right program to build such a database. I have tried MS Access, but it's not the ideal program for photo's. Suggestions are appreciated!
  9. Nice! Counting the two sceattas that are on their way, my sceatta collection is now 99 coins. Realistically, 100 should be possible before the 31th
  10. For collectors of sceattas, Wigraed and Tilberth are familiar names, though they are a bit of an acquired taste. They represent a very small subgroup of the series R sceattas - R10 and R11 respectively, very late in the chronology of this already late and imitative series. Nobody really knows who Wigraed and Tilberth were: likely a local moneyer, or perhaps a chief. A relatively large number of dies of the Wigraed type is known (Chris Timms, expert on series R, recently published a study on this type, which can be found here (link). This study was partly based on a corpus I had compiled prior, but never found time to properly write down. I was happy to provide it to Chris.) While approximately 70 specimens are known, they seldomly come to market, with only 12 instances appearing on ACsearch since 2010. Nevertheless, I was fortunate to acquire two specimens that were overlooked on Facebook groups. Interestingly, and this is something I just found out, coin #2 and #3, two coins of very similar style (but no die match) were found by the same person. Of coin #3, I have a known find location (Downham Market, Norfolk). Based on assumption, coin #2 must be found in the vicinity. The aim of the present post is to (1) distribute the study by Chris Timms, and (2) categorize my coins following this publication, and (3) add some supplementary data to the study of Chris. The publication on R10 sceattas by Chris Timms Chris grouped the R10 in 6 groups, some of which are again categorized in subgroups: Runes WIGRAED fully written out, with the rune AE (looking like capital F) with a long tail. subtype 1: two pellets under ear. No pellets in annulets. subtype 2: no pellets in annulets subtype 3: pellets within annulets, angled line with pellet below the ear. subtype 4: no pellets within annulets subtype 5: pellets in annulets subtype 6: to left, no pellets in annulets Runes WIGRAED fully written out, large XX under the bust Runes WIGRD abbreviated, large XX under the bust Runes WIGRAED fully written out, with the rune AE (looking like capital F) with a long tail, bust to left(=this is the main difference with group 1) Runes WIGRAED fully written out, large XX under the bust, bust to left (= main difference with group 2) Runes WIGRD abbreviated, large XX under the bust, bust to left (= main difference with group 4) My coins, categorized following this method: As said, I now own three Wigraed sceattas. The one below is included in the corpus (listed as #53) Coin #1 The first was actually one of my first sceattas, bought at a Dutch coin fair and then unrecognized by myself as an R10 (and luckily also by the seller). Its reverse is unique for this R10 series - no other sceattas I know of have this geometric pattern. It's of very low silver purity, and low weight. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series R10 (Wigraed)), minted: East Anglia, uncertain mint; c. 710-750 AD Obv: Radiate bust of crude style right, annulet either side of head, runic ""WIGR"", before, ΛO and pellets behind, wearing collared drapery Rev: Beaded degenerate standard containing symmetrical geometric symbols, central annulet, cross pommée to each side, diagonals at outer corners Weight: 0.72g; Ø:11 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 11.150. Provenance: Coin fair Houten; bought from E. Datema; acq.: 09-2020 Chris Timms put this it in WIGRAED long tailed AE (AEL) obverse group 2, and reverse group 4. Obverse group 2: there are no pellets in the annulets Reverse type: see here https://www.r8sceattatypes.website/wigaed_long_tailed_ael_groups_one_and_four.html Coin #2 I spotted the next coin on Facebook, but was just too late. Luckily, the person who bought it was willing to sell it to me. It's a debased coin in poor condition, and not included in the corpus of Chris. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series R10 (Wigraed)), minted: East Anglia, uncertain mint; c. 710-750 AD Obv: Radiate bust of crude style right, annulet either side of head, runic ""WIGR"", before, ΛO and pellets behind, wearing collared drapery Rev: Beaded degenerate standard Weight: 0.71g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 11.150. Provenance: Found by Charles Brown Ex. Victor Parsons 05-2023; acq.: 05-2023 Find location: England, exact location unknown Published: No The corroded obverse makes this a difficult attribution. I have highlighted the aspects that are relevant for the attribution: Clearly, the runes are abbreviated (RED), and there are large crosses under the bust (BLUE). There is only one annulet visible, but it contains no pellet. This would make it Group 3, subgroup 1. The reverse is type one (see https://www.r8sceattatypes.website/r_10_wigrd_rd.html). Coin #3 The third and final Wigraed is the coin below, which is again in a poor state of preservation. I bought it the same way as the coin above: it was listed on FB cheaply, and bought cheaply by another member who happily sold it with some profit to me. I believe it's exactly the same attribution as the coin above (it's not a die match, but very close to it): EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series R10 (Wigraed)), minted: East Anglia, uncertain mint; c. 710-750 AD Obv: Radiate bust of crude style right, annulet either side of head, runic ""WIGR"", before, ΛO and pellets behind, wearing collared drapery Rev: Beaded degenerate standard Weight: 0.68g; Ø:11.6 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 11.150. Provenance: Found by Charles Brown, sold to David Jenner, and bought from him. ; acq.: 11-2023 Find location: Downham Market, Norfolk Published: EMC 2023.0503. Supplementary data to the study of Chris TImms Search methods and characteristics. As mentioned above, I compiled a corpus of R10 sceattas (n=66), using exhaustive searches, see Table 1 (mostly during night shifts). Most came from EMC (duplicates from other sources were deleted if the coin was included in EMC). Weight was available for 55 coins. The average was 0.84 (SD = 0.099), see histogram Figure 1, a weight that is slightly lower than the average sceatta (usually, sceattas weigh 1.0g). Based on photo's, most coins were of low silver content, which might explain the low weight. Dimensions were available for 9 coins, and were 11.9mm on average (slightly larger than usual, but because of the small number of coins of which a diameter is known, no firm conclusion should be made). Of the coins with a legible obverse (n=45), most were oriented to the right (n=35). Most reverses showed the typical TToII reverse, a reverse that is common on series A / C / R. Distribution pattern The previous distribution map was drawn by Metcalf in 1993-4, based on two R10 sceattas. The current study increases this number substantially. Of 42 coins, a find location was known. All coins were found in the UK. I drafted a distribution pattern, showing all known find locations. Red squares are locations with 2 or less finds registered. Blue are more than 2. This map shows a clear distribution pattern, with most coins found between the villages Butley and Rendlesham - only 4.4 miles from the Sutton Hoo burial site. In Rendlesham, a large Anglo-Saxon settlement of more than 124 acres was identified. @Napprobably can expand a bit more on the historical significance of this location. Conclusion The study by Chris Timms provide a useful method to attribute the R10 sceattas based on style. The data supplemented to this study by myself provide evidence for a mint in East Anglia, possibly near the Anglo Saxon village Rendlæsham, and is the largest study on distribution patterns to date, with the only other being the study by Metcalf who included two examples.
  11. I don't post them often, but I do have a Carolingian coin (had a couple of them, but sold them to finance my avatar coin). I kept this one, because of its fabulous toning. CAROLINGIAN, Charles II ""le Chauve"". Denomination: AR Denier (Carolingian, early type), minted: Le Mans, France; 834-877 Obv: + GRATIA D-I REX, monogram Rev: + CINOMANIS CIVITAS, cross in the middle Weight: 1.69g; Ø:19 mm. Catalogue: Nou.146c-Dep.559-Prou.420. Provenance: From finder (Paul van der Ven); acq.: 01-2020 Find location: Amiens, France Published: No Beautiful example, wonderful and pleasant toning. And, to be dated roughly in the same period, my only artefact: "EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: Pewter Pseudo-coin fibula (Pseudo-coin fibula), minted: Frisian / Carolingian; 9th-10th century Obv: EVO[??]DVS, bust to right Rev: Incuse of obverse Weight: 10.53g; Ø:34 mm. Catalogue: NA. Provenance: From Hollandia Numismatics, who bought it from finder. ; acq.: 07-2022 Find location: Zeeland, the Netherlands Published: Numis: 1167868 Derived from a Carolingian Solidus of the MVNVS DIVINVM type, placing the dating to the 9th or 10th century. Discussed in depth, and compared with mould-identical examples here:
  12. Happy to have helped 🙂 turned out nice! the yellow colour can happen because the coin was immersed in the same solution. Sodium thiosulphates ultimately may cause sulphate deposits.
  13. Thanks, this was a copy error I guess, will change it in my files!
  14. I had a productive meeting with a coin seller last month, resulting in the purchase of a couple really interesting sceatta's, bringing the total of my collection to 96 sceattas, (+12) and 4 tremisses/thrymsa's (+1). I'll post a selection below. #1 arguably the first sceatta, a transitional type. There are different PADA types, with the earliest of high gold content, and the later ones of nearly pure silver (containing minimal gold). This one belongs to the later phase, so nearly pure silver: EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AV Thrysma (PADA, PaIII, type 97), minted: Kent; c.665/70-670/5 Obv: Diademed bust right, jewel before, row of pellets behind head, square drapery, legend NV/vNI [?] surrounding Rev: Plain central cross, annulets in quarters, within beaded circle, part Runic legend reads PADA in runes Weight: 0.84g; Ø:11 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 1-50. #2 A relative common English sceatta, series A, one of the earliest sceattas closely imitating the PADA type. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series A), minted: Probably Eastern England; 690-710 AD Obv: Bust to right, TIIC before, straight exergual lines. Rev: Standard with TToII inside, legend around Weight: 1.11g; Ø:11.3 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 3-10 (based on flat exergual line obv). Find location: Unknown Published: No #3 This series BIb has a different, 'busy' style compared to the other BIb types. The pelleted sun (?) before the bust is intriguing. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series BIb), minted: Mint in Essex or East Anglia; c 685-700 Obv: Diademed bust to right, cross before, pelleted jewel before Rev: Bird on cross to right, surrounded with annulets and dots, within dotted serpent eating its own tail. Weight: 1.09g; Ø:12 mm. Catalogue: Not in Sceatta list. Provenance: Bought from Finder (Raphael Seillier); acq.: 10-2023 Find location: Near Etaples, France Published: No #4 A crudely executed series D BMC type 2c (continental), struck with a broken obverse die. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series D, type 2c), minted: Frisia; 690-715 AD Obv: Degenerated diademed head, runic inscriptings before Rev: Central cross-pommee with dots on each corner; cross above, annulet below. Weight: 1.14g; Ø:11.1 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 8-10. Provenance: Ex. Jim Squares, via Ebay (Seller Luckyjim8, ID 266404359387); acq.: 09-2023 Find location: Norfolk (UK) Published: no #5 A plumed bird variety (series E, primary phase) of exceptional quality. This one closely resembles var J-K, but the order of the three pellets on the reverse (in a vertical line) is unusual; for var J these would be < and > , for K, this would be > and <. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series E, primary phase, plumed bird, uncertain variety), minted: Frisia; 695-715/720 Obv: Plumed bird to right, tail ending in three lines, long neck, cross-pommee below Rev: Central pellet-within annulet, flanked by three pellets in straight vertical order, four horizontal bars around, all within dotted square border with crosses outside Weight: 1.12g; Ø:12.3 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 87-30. #6 A series E, secondary phase sub-variety D, also in superb condition. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety D), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent or 'porcupine' with three vertical lines below spine (one attached to distal end) Rev: TToII within standard Weight: 0.89g; Ø:13.1 mm. Catalogue: . #7 One of the many varieties of the secondary phase continental series E, sub-variety K. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent above pellet-outlined dolphin shape with central band, bars below. Rev: Central annulet, four diagonal bars, pellets between, within dotted square Weight: 0.97g; Ø:11.9 mm. Catalogue: SL 100-20. No die match in JMP 2010. #8 A very unusual left-facing series E (about 1% of the series E is left facing). This one is very crudely carved. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series E, secondary phase, sub-variety k (left faced variety)), minted: Frisia; 715-755 Obv: Quilled crescent to the left, cross-pommee below, large H and pellets Rev: Central pellet-within-annulet, four dots around, all within (small) dotted circle, cross outside. Weight: 0.6g; Ø:10.5 mm. Catalogue: Not in JMP 2010. Reverse similar to primary phase var. D. Crude style of the obverse suggests an immitation. Minor deposits on obverse. #10 A common series J, type 37. This is my 5th or 6th series J, but I'm finally content with the quality of this specimen. Series J type 37 is usually of very poor silver, or even plated. This one is OK. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series J, type 37), minted: Mint in Northumbria; 710-725 AD Obv: Two confronted diademed heads; between, long cross with trident end; double border Rev: Cross, at each end a bird right; double border. Weight: 0.89g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: SL 19-30. #11 A relatively scarce series J type 72, combining the same obverse with a different reverse. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series J, type 72), minted: Northumbria (probably York); 710-725 Obv: Two crude diademed busts facing one another; cruciform trident between Rev: Fantastic bird (eagle?) right, looking left, encircled by gaping, serpent-headed, worm with open mouth and beaded body Weight: 0.85g; Ø:13.0x10.8 mm. Catalogue: SL 19-10. Metcal p. 355: "Type 72 is known from a dozen specimens, with few if any die-links. They include four finds from Domburg, two in the Brussels cabinet, one in Paris, one from Richborough, one from the Swindon area, and one from Lakenheath, Suffolk. No finds have been recorded from the midlands or the north of England. The four finds from Domburg should be compared with seven of Type 37. The question obviously arises whether Type 72 has anything to do with York, or whether it is not merely a Low Countries imitative type which borrows the obverse of Type 37. The artistic quality of the dies is certainly not impressive in comparison with the rest of Series J." #12 An extremely rare series J type 36 variety, this is actually the second known (the other one was part of the Tony Abramson collection. This coin is an obverse and reverse die match to that one, underlining the rarity). Metcalf wasn't aware of this variety. The iconography of the reverse is of interest: we see a bird, which is grabbed or bitten by a serpent. Abramson has a theory that this coin was part of three reverse types, showing (1) the snake beneath the bird, (2) this coin, the snake biting the bird, and (3) the bird throwing the snake away. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series J, type 36 (var)), minted: Anglia; 710-760 Obv: Crude diademed bust right, prominent lips, pelleted wreath ties behind, serpent before coiled in figure-of-eight. Rev: Two birds, possibly eagles, right, one in foreground with splayed feet and three tail feathers. Coiled serpent before Weight: 0.92g; Ø:12.1 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 20-40 (PU). #13 the common variety is this one: EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series J, type 36), minted: Anglia; 710-760 Obv: Crude diademed bust right, prominent lips, pelleted wreath ties behind, serpent before coiled in figure-of-eight. Rev: Two birds, possibly eagles, right, one in foreground with splayed feet and three tail feathers. Coiled serpent before Weight: 0.57g; Ø:11.5 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 20-10 (N). #14 the final, also extremely rare one (this is the fourth known, with two exemplars discussed by Metcalf, and the third one sold in a recent Elsen auction (2021). All three coins are unprovenanced, but my coin was found in France. Elsen is a Belgian auction house, suggesting that the 2021 coin might have been a continental find as well. EARLY MEDIEVAL, Anonymous. Denomination: AR Sceatta (Series J, type 60), minted: Anglia; 710-760 Obv: Crude diademed head right, crescent ear, pellet lips protruding or receding, braided hair. Rev: Crude diademed head right, crescent ear, pellet lips protruding or receding, braided hair. Weight: 0.62g; Ø:11.9 mm. Catalogue: Abramson 18-10 (ER). Metcalf, p. 354: "Type 60 seems to be known from only two specimens. It is accordingly difficult to think of it as a substantive type. On the other hand its originality of design and its artistic talent are hardly what one would have expected from an opportunist counterfeiter: why produce a novel design, on which suspicion is bound to fall? Perhaps it was an abortive official issue - a new type that was launched to replace Type 85, but which failed for lack of demand for the moneyers’ services. Alternatively, could it have been an experimental reverse design preceding Type 85, that was quickly replaced by the bird on cross? That, at least, sounds unlikely, both because Type 85 was based on Series B, and because the inspiration for Type 60 would seem to have been the wolf-headed torc of Series K, Type 32a (which was present alongside Types 85 and 37 in the Garton-on-the- Wolds find). The two specimens of Type 60 are from very similar but different dies. SCBI Hunterian 100 weighs 0.74g, and BM, Barnett 259 weighs 0.97g. Neither is provenanced. The obverse is exactly as Type 85. The lips-to-nose angle is appropriate, and the style is very acceptable. But as Type 85 includes such deceptive imitations, one ought to look into any die-similarities with Type 85 as carefully as possible. Rigold comments that both obverses are similar to his BIIIc, 2. There are even closer comparanda, e.g. two coins in Leeuwarden and Brussels discussed above, which seem to be by the same hand. One should reserve judgement, and perhaps hope that a die-link between Types 60 and 85 will turn up. Provisionally, its status seems doubtful, in spite of the quality of its workmanship. The reverse of Type 60 is imitated on a double-reverse ‘mule’, TMP 1895, pl.2, 26. " Personal note: a third specimen surfaced at Elsen auction 149, lot 523.
×
×
  • Create New...