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This recent addition is a bronze unit of Cunobeline, more famous for his gold 'barley ear' staters.

Cunobeline/Cunobelin ('Strong as a Dog' in Brittonic) was king of the Catuvellauni and Trinovantes tribes (in modern Hertfordshire, Middlesex and Essex) from about AD9 to AD40. His plentiful coins in bronze, silver and gold are usually inscribed CVNO (for Cunobeline) and either VERL for Verlamion (St Albans), the Catuvellauni capital, or CAMV for Camulodunon (Colchester), the Trinovantian capital.

He's unusual for an Iron Age king in that he's known beyond his coins. Roman historian Suetonius called him 'King of the Britons'. He wasn't, but he was the most powerful, and probably a client king of Augustus, which would've given him access to Roman luxuries. This coin clearly copies Roman issues like this Roman Republic As.

Cunobeline Later Bronze Trinovantian W Unit, 9-40image.png.81af8887071ff4e645288a657ece5137.pngCamulodunon (Roman Camulodunum, modern Colchester). Bronze, 14mm, 2.19g. Janiform head; CVNO below. Sow seated right beneath a tree; CAMV on panel below (ABC 2981; S 346; V 2105).

Cunobeline found his way into legend. He became confused with Beli Mawr (Beli the Great) in Welsh medieval literature, thus becoming an ancestor of Welsh royalty and a cousin of the Virgin Mary. Even in early legend, however, Beli Mawr was the father of Cassivellaunus, who Cunobeline's father succeeded as the king of the Catuvellauni, so it wasn't far off.

Cunobeline appeared in various confused ways in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae. This ended up giving him a starring role in William Shakespeare's play, Cymbeline, although the character bore little resemblance to Cunobeline.

His father, Tasciovanus, had founded Verlamion, and had a similarly extensive coinage. Cunobeline seems to have struck coins first in Camulodunon, and so may have ruled there before his father's death around AD9. He may even have helped conquer the Trinovantes.

Tasciovanus 3rd Coinage ‘Trinovantian O’ Unit, 5BC-AD5image.png.8d7f0994efa1a91785dbb529f9a011ae.pngVerlamion. Silver, 13mm, 1.40g. Quadrilobe inscribed with saltire, superimposed on stylized cross. V-E-R-L in angles. Boar right; TAS above, star below (ABC 2628).

Cunobeline's three sons each had their own kingdoms: Amminus/Adminius had Kent, Togodumnus was king of the Catuvellauni and Caratacus/Caractacus, under Cunobeline's brother Epaticcus, expanded into Atrebates territory. The Atrebates king, Verica, fled to Rome and Claudius used it as an excuse for the invasion in AD43. Caratacus was captured by the Romans and made a famous speech before Claudius that earned him a pardon from execution.

Adminius was banished from Britain by Cunobelin shortly before the latter's death around AD40. Adminius fled to the emperor Caligula, who also used it as an excuse for an invasion. His attempt was rather embarrassing - his plans were confused an he ended up ordering his soldiers to attack the waves and gather seashells as plunder.

Amminus ‘Biga’ Unit, 35-40image.png.482b3ea36708306a4795ef755d81a89d.pngCantii Kingdom. Silver, 10-12mm, 1.00g. Bust right, AMMI in front, beaded border. Facing chariot, head of charioteer between, S below, E to left of head, G to right of head, beaded border (ABC 459). Celtic Coin Index CCI 07.0015.

 

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@John Conduitt...That's a really nice addition and rare type! Certainly does show the influence of the Roman empire at the time...Congrats on the new pick up.

I only have the one and you've seen it before but is still one of my favourite coins...Hope you don't mind seeing it again...

554364555_cunobelin_black(2).jpg.86bda3aca7453cace71ba35d5764a6b9.jpg

Britannia, Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Cunobelin. Circa 9-41 AD. AE Unit (2.437 g, 14mm).
Obv: Winged head left, CVNO in front, BELIN behind.
Rev: Metal worker, presumably the smith god known as Sucellus in parts of Gaul, sitting on a solid seat with a detached upright back, holding an L-shaped hammer in his right hand, left hand holding a metal bowl, there is always a distinct bun of hair behind the smith's head, TASCIO (Tascionus his father) behind, beaded border.
Van Arsdell 2097; ABC 2969; SCBC 342. Hobbs 1972-83;..VF.

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3 minutes ago, Spaniard said:

@John Conduitt...That's a really nice addition and rare type! Certainly does show the influence of the Roman empire at the time...Congrats on the new pick up.

I only have the one and you've seen it before but is still one of my favourite coins...Hope you don't mind seeing it again...

554364555_cunobelin_black(2).jpg.86bda3aca7453cace71ba35d5764a6b9.jpg

Britannia, Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Cunobelin. Circa 9-41 AD. AE Unit (2.437 g, 14mm).
Obv: Winged head left, CVNO in front, BELIN behind.
Rev: Metal worker, presumably the smith god known as Sucellus in parts of Gaul, sitting on a solid seat with a detached upright back, holding an L-shaped hammer in his right hand, left hand holding a metal bowl, there is always a distinct bun of hair behind the smith's head, TASCIO (Tascionus his father) behind, beaded border.
Van Arsdell 2097; ABC 2969; SCBC 342. Hobbs 1972-83;..VF.

I love this coin. Chris Rudd had one for sale a few days ago but it wasn't as nice as this, particularly the obverse.

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34 minutes ago, John Conduitt said:

This recent addition is a bronze unit of Cunobeline, more famous for his gold 'barley ear' staters.

Cunobeline/Cunobelin ('Strong as a Dog' in Brittonic) was king of the Catuvellauni and Trinovantes tribes (in modern Hertfordshire, Middlesex and Essex) from about AD9 to AD40. His plentiful coins in bronze, silver and gold are usually inscribed CVNO (for Cunobeline) and either VERL for Verlamion (St Albans), the Catuvellauni capital, or CAMV for Camulodunon (Colchester), the Trinovantian capital.

He's unusual for an Iron Age king in that he's known beyond his coins. Roman historian Suetonius called him 'King of the Britons'. He wasn't, but he was the most powerful, and probably a client king of Augustus, which would've given him access to Roman luxuries. This coin clearly copies Roman issues like this Roman Republic As.

Cunobeline Later Bronze Trinovantian W Unit, 9-40image.png.81af8887071ff4e645288a657ece5137.pngCamulodunon (Roman Camulodunum, modern Colchester). Bronze, 14mm, 2.19g. Janiform head; CVNO below. Sow seated right beneath a tree; CAMV on panel below (ABC 2981; S 346; V 2105).

Cunobeline found his way into legend. He became confused with Beli Mawr (Beli the Great) in Welsh medieval literature, thus becoming an ancestor of Welsh royalty and a cousin of the Virgin Mary. Even in early legend, however, Beli Mawr was the father of Cassivellaunus, who Cunobeline's father succeeded as the king of the Catuvellauni, so it wasn't far off.

Cunobeline appeared in various confused ways in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae. This ended up giving him a starring role in William Shakespeare's play, Cymbeline, although the character bore little resemblance to Cunobeline.

His father, Tasciovanus, had founded Verlamion, and had a similarly extensive coinage. Cunobeline seems to have struck coins first in Camulodunon, and so may have ruled there before his father's death around AD9. He may even have helped conquer the Trinovantes.

Tasciovanus 3rd Coinage ‘Trinovantian O’ Unit, 5BC-AD5image.png.8d7f0994efa1a91785dbb529f9a011ae.pngVerlamion. Silver, 13mm, 1.40g. Quadrilobe inscribed with saltire, superimposed on stylized cross. V-E-R-L in angles. Boar right; TAS above, star below (ABC 2628).

Cunobeline's three sons each had their own kingdoms: Amminus/Adminius had Kent, Togodumnus was king of the Catuvellauni and Caratacus/Caractacus, under Cunobeline's brother Epaticcus, expanded into Atrebates territory. The Atrebates king, Verica, fled to Rome and Claudius used it as an excuse for the invasion in AD43. Caratacus was captured by the Romans and made a famous speech before Claudius that earned him a pardon from execution.

Adminius was banished from Britain by Cunobelin shortly before the latter's death around AD40. Adminius fled to the emperor Caligula, who also used it as an excuse for an invasion. His attempt was rather embarrassing - his plans were confused an he ended up ordering his soldiers to attack the waves and gather seashells as plunder.

Amminus ‘Biga’ Unit, 35-40image.png.482b3ea36708306a4795ef755d81a89d.pngCantii Kingdom. Silver, 10-12mm, 1.00g. Bust right, AMMI in front, beaded border. Facing chariot, head of charioteer between, S below, E to left of head, G to right of head, beaded border (ABC 459). Celtic Coin Index CCI 07.0015.

 

John, Nice score ☺️! You're right, Cunobelin did Romanize British coinage & actively traded with the Romans. Barley was an important export & used by the Celts for making beer 🍺.

1778334441_CelticStaterCamulodunumMint.jpg.214fd79c462da5487a63dd2042ba5d66.jpg

 

 

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2 hours ago, Spaniard said:

@John Conduitt...That's a really nice addition and rare type! Certainly does show the influence of the Roman empire at the time...Congrats on the new pick up.

I only have the one and you've seen it before but is still one of my favourite coins...Hope you don't mind seeing it again...

554364555_cunobelin_black(2).jpg.86bda3aca7453cace71ba35d5764a6b9.jpg

Britannia, Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Cunobelin. Circa 9-41 AD. AE Unit (2.437 g, 14mm).
Obv: Winged head left, CVNO in front, BELIN behind.
Rev: Metal worker, presumably the smith god known as Sucellus in parts of Gaul, sitting on a solid seat with a detached upright back, holding an L-shaped hammer in his right hand, left hand holding a metal bowl, there is always a distinct bun of hair behind the smith's head, TASCIO (Tascionus his father) behind, beaded border.
Van Arsdell 2097; ABC 2969; SCBC 342. Hobbs 1972-83;..VF.

Great die engraving for a small coin 😊.

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