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Dump Potins - S 64


John Conduitt
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This is my last post on early British potins - the final step in the evolution from Massalia bronzes to Thurrock and Angular Bull potins. The coin below also happens to be from the same lot as the others I posted.

The unattractively named 'dump' potins are so called because they're smaller and thicker (much like George I's dump halfpennies). The flan on this one is 20% narrower than the Angular Bulls, but it weighs roughly the same.

The previous issues suffered from incomplete casting (where the mould wasn't filled) and were tricky to separate. These problems were solved by reducing the size of the flans. That made them less attractive, but easier to manufacture. The first of these was produced around 50BC, just after Julius Caesar landed in Kent (and went away again).

Cantian E Class II Early Dump Potin, 50-45BCimage.png.1609b9cfffa73dece3ae4c5d6cc079a7.pngCantii Tribe, Kent. Bronze, 13-14mm, 1.50g. Head of Apollo right, large pellet in centre. Bull of straight lines, large pellet in centre, direction indeterminate (S 64; ABC 174; VA 135).

Again, Spink lumps them all together under S 64, while Van Arsdell separates many of the variations, although both agree they're from Kent.

The series came to an end around 40BC, when they were replaced by hammered coinage. By that point, cast potins had been in production for about 80 years - the same length as the entirety of British Celtic hammered coin production.

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