Jump to content

Billung dukes of Saxony: feudal coins from 10th-11th-century Germany and Frisia


JeandAcre

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Very engaging perspective, @Anaximander.  York (and York /Northumbria, in the intervals when they under the same rule) strike me involving a particularly complex combination of Norse (including Hiberno-Norse) and Danish elements, both demographically and by rule.  Wish I, for one, had a better handle, at least on the basic outline.  ...And wouldn't it be great if anyone had arrived at an estimate of the relative size of the  populations?

Edited by JeandAcre
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have been reading this thread, you'll discover that my collection includes a large proportion of Viking imitative coins. It's not intentional! It's just something that I have not avoided.  Here are a couple of nice Viking coins or imitations of coins of 'Englaland.'  The first two are rather common. 

 image.jpeg.4e81438efa2abacb496911b056453d64.jpeg image.jpeg.2ac03a01895e3cfb6530432aa27de3cc.jpeg 

Anglo-Dane. Cnut + Siefrith, Viking Kingdom of York. 895-902. AR Penny (1.37 gm, 20.1mm, 12h) L. & S. Class IIb. Patriarchal cross ⠁‡⠠, pellet in each quarter of small cross. CИVT RЄX: C-И-V-T at limbs, R-Є-X follow (reads as CR:.TEИXV::)  / Crosslet in center with two pellets. CVИ ИET TI . (CVNNETI) around inner dotted border. gVF. Bt. Silbury Coins, 2014.  Spink SCBC 993; North 501. SCBI 36 (Berlin) 118-119 var. (pellets).
AngloDane_St.Edmund.SCBC960..jpg.28715696a7777b5a810ec1f47e37c3e1.jpg image.jpeg.557a254164ccd2c7ba19d3041e35acd3.jpeg
Anglo-Dane. Viking East Anglia, St Edmund Memorial. 885-915. AR Penny (1.35 gm, 19.4mm, 9h) of Ipswich. Large A within circle, C EΛDMVNIE around (S sideways).  / Short cross within circle. ΛOΛLBERT NIE (Albert, Germanic moneyer). gVF. Silbury Coins, 2014.  Ex. Somerset Collection. Spink SCBC 960. BMC p.101 150; MEC 1 #1388-1390; MEC 8 #2457-2459; North 483. cf SCBI 1 Cambridge 461-463; SCBI 36 Berlin 95ff.
AngloDane.Alfred.SCBC1066var..jpg.4e39d3e0ea200e0fbb8159aa50f8e91e.jpg  image.jpeg.75cc6bab0ba2d00ec9be41aaa14f34be.jpeg 
Anglo-Dane. Alfred the Great ("Guthrum" Imitative). 871-899. AR Penny, Canterbury style (1.52ᵍᵐ 20.4ᵐᵐ 7ʰ) Horizontal two line type, HP9P, of Southern Danelaw. Circumscription cross, AELFR-EDR-E. Peck marks around cross.  / • EÐELV • INΞ ꟽỌ̇ • (Ethelwine, moneyer; ligated NE and inverted M).  VF. Davissons EA 28 #71 aftersale. Spink SCBC 1066; North 635; Blackburn VII p.343 in Viking Coinage BNS 7 (2011), BNJ 59 (1989) p.33 #43.
 
These coins give me great pleasure, and I appreciate the opportunity to share them here with you. 
  • Like 3
  • Mind blown 1
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/9/2024 at 7:02 PM, Anaximander said:

If you have been reading this thread, you'll discover that my collection includes a large proportion of Viking imitative coins. It's not intentional! It's just something that I have not avoided.  Here are a couple of nice Viking coins or imitations of coins of 'Englaland.'  The first two are rather common. 

 image.jpeg.4e81438efa2abacb496911b056453d64.jpeg image.jpeg.2ac03a01895e3cfb6530432aa27de3cc.jpeg 

Anglo-Dane. Cnut + Siefrith, Viking Kingdom of York. 895-902. AR Penny (1.37 gm, 20.1mm, 12h) L. & S. Class IIb. Patriarchal cross ⠁‡⠠, pellet in each quarter of small cross. CИVT RЄX: C-И-V-T at limbs, R-Є-X follow (reads as CR:.TEИXV::)  / Crosslet in center with two pellets. CVИ ИET TI . (CVNNETI) around inner dotted border. gVF. Bt. Silbury Coins, 2014.  Spink SCBC 993; North 501. SCBI 36 (Berlin) 118-119 var. (pellets).
AngloDane_St.Edmund.SCBC960..jpg.28715696a7777b5a810ec1f47e37c3e1.jpg image.jpeg.557a254164ccd2c7ba19d3041e35acd3.jpeg
Anglo-Dane. Viking East Anglia, St Edmund Memorial. 885-915. AR Penny (1.35 gm, 19.4mm, 9h) of Ipswich. Large A within circle, C EΛDMVNIE around (S sideways).  / Short cross within circle. ΛOΛLBERT NIE (Albert, Germanic moneyer). gVF. Silbury Coins, 2014.  Ex. Somerset Collection. Spink SCBC 960. BMC p.101 150; MEC 1 #1388-1390; MEC 8 #2457-2459; North 483. cf SCBI 1 Cambridge 461-463; SCBI 36 Berlin 95ff.
AngloDane.Alfred.SCBC1066var..jpg.4e39d3e0ea200e0fbb8159aa50f8e91e.jpg  image.jpeg.75cc6bab0ba2d00ec9be41aaa14f34be.jpeg 
Anglo-Dane. Alfred the Great ("Guthrum" Imitative). 871-899. AR Penny, Canterbury style (1.52ᵍᵐ 20.4ᵐᵐ 7ʰ) Horizontal two line type, HP9P, of Southern Danelaw. Circumscription cross, AELFR-EDR-E. Peck marks around cross.  / • EÐELV • INΞ ꟽỌ̇ • (Ethelwine, moneyer; ligated NE and inverted M).  VF. Davissons EA 28 #71 aftersale. Spink SCBC 1066; North 635; Blackburn VII p.343 in Viking Coinage BNS 7 (2011), BNJ 59 (1989) p.33 #43.
 
These coins give me great pleasure, and I appreciate the opportunity to share them here with you. 

@Anaximander your "Guthrum' type is a very nice example. The early Anglo-Scandinavian coinage of York is a wonderful series - here's one of my best with a plain cross on the obverse and an 'Ebraice Civitas' reverse legend (S.989), formerly in the Andrew Wayne and Lockett collections: 

image.png.8fb303a69e124fceb2f1fe2daf8982b2.png

 

  • Like 1
  • Cookie 1
  • Heart Eyes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a magnificent specimen, @Grimulfr. A plate coin, no less, for SCBC 2015! 

I was just looking at this type on EMC (Cambridge Museum), and I saw a reverse die match (which EMC calls the obverse) with SCBI 29 (Merseyside) #212.  See also SCBI 48 (Northern Museums) #779.

image.jpeg.04d21c416deafa1168554c5fc0bf4800.jpeg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

British Anglo-Saxon, Danish East Anglia. Coin weight. Late 9th century. Circular lead weight with inset coin (48.10 g). Coin is a local issue of an AR Penny of Alfred the Great (AD 871-899): first coinage, lunette type, circa AD 871-875; uncertain mint and moneyer (cf. North 625; cf. SCBC 1057). Cf. Williams, Anglo-Saxon 21 (for type), and 22 (for value). For weight: good condition, tan and brown patina, small area chipped off edge; for coin: Very Fine. Very rare multiple-value weight. Ex The David Karpeles Collection. Ex CNG MBS 76 (12 Sept 2007), Lot 1855. Ex Goldberg Sale 133 Pre-Long Beach (1 Feb 2023), Lot 2468.

image.jpeg.4f32395e78ea71d9925e46757b8fb656.jpeg

British Anglo-Saxon, Danish East Anglia ("Danelaw"). Coin weight. Late 9th century. Circular lead weight with inset coin (24.01 g with coin). Coin is an AR Penny of Alfred the Great (AD 871-899): first coinage, lunette type, circa AD 871-875; Canterbury mint, moneyer Eadulf. Ref: (SCBC -; cf. BMC 187 [for moneyer on cross-and-lozenge type]; North 625; SCBC 1057). Cf. G. Williams, "Anglo-Saxon and Viking Coin Weights," BNJ 69 (1999), 21. For weight: good condition, tan and brown patina, small area chipped off edge; for coin: Fine, toned, slight roughness to reverse. Very rare, and an unrecorded moneyer for Alfred's lunette coinage. Ex The David Karpeles Collection. Ex CNG MBS 70 (21 Sept 2005), Lot 1249. Ex Goldberg Sale 133 Pre-Long Beach (1 Feb 2023), Lot 2469.

image.jpeg.e906faf5f0669e629dda972fb88cc6dc.jpeg

Goldberg Note: Williams' analysis of the known weights of this type clearly places them in the Danelaw during the later 9th century, when the Viking economy was still bullion-based, and weights were used for weighing both coinage and bullion. As with many of the known examples, this particular weight, at 24.01g, is equivalent to a Viking ounce (eyrir) of 24-26.6g. The purpose of the coins set into one end of these weights is uncertain, but Williams argues that they served as a symbol of authority. Although the Viking economy was still pre-monetary, Williams notes that the Vikings were familiar with coinage and likely recognized that their designs were a symbol of authority. He also suggests that the Vikings were probably familiar with the Anglo-Saxon weights, which were validated by being stamped with official dies, and argues that the lack of coin dies for validating their own weights was remedied by applying a coin within each. Williams points out that the fact that the coins were issued by Anglo-Saxon kings was irrelevant, as the vast majority of the Vikings were illiterate.

  • Mind blown 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...