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Droysens Allgemeiner Historischer Handatlas 1886


Coinmaster
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Hi all,

soms years ago I bought the 'Droysens Allgemeiner Historischer Handatlas 1886'. It has beautiful maps, including from medieval times.
Fortunately for you, the maps are also online available via this link: http://www.maproom.org/00/08/index.php?fbclid=IwAR1gacS1F0qq3CND9xY_eZ50fMiH9-Bh_aOSHas7J4v8ftPKC44d-N6wSdc.

My favorite is plate 26/27, with alle the German states in detail, including The Netherlands (where I live): http://maproom.org/00/08/present.php?m=0026&fbclid=IwAR2YF-n2KfpTfejAR_f5OScZ-kDyW6xicN3XFCzTa29W99i-jKYWLO2SR8Y. You can zoom in on the map. Many of these areas from bishops, counts and dukes produced their own coins.
My favorite county is that from Kleve (1202-1347). I recently wrote this article about some medieval coins from Kleve in where I made clear coins with text 'NOSNEN' and 'HOSNEN' are to be attributed to the (currently Dutch) city Huissen: https://www.academia.edu/87244877/_2022_De_muntplaats_Nosnen_in_het_graafschap_Kleef.
 

Atlas 2.jpeg

screenshot_4752.jpg

screenshot_4753.jpg

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Thanks for the link to the digital version of Droysen's Handatlas – I didn't know this work was available online. This is indeed very helpful!

To keep it numismatic, here are some of my coins from the small princely states shown on the map you posted. All are later than your medieval coins. The first is a Kleve 4 heller piece minted in 1605 – this is a rather scarce coin:

605726312_FruheNeuzeitAltdeutschlandKleve4Heller1604.png.2a9a1e62bf9e0ec615ea6a4a0d46905f.png

The second is a 1609 groschen from the duchy of Ravensberg:337911826_FruheNeuzeitAltdeutschlandRavensbergGroschen1609.png.3d7e8268dc542c2db2e570b620f740ad.png

 

A 1618 groschen from the county of Lippe

436812712_FruheNeuzeitAltdeutschlandLippe-DetmoldGroschen1618.png.f0c1b1fe6465a58e8bb93f25166ac530.png

And finally a half batzen from Waldeck, minted in 1595:

902142098_FruheNeuzeitAltdeutschlandWaldeckGroschen1595.png.6949fa8db86f579ff90f08cf240681dd.png

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Astounding assortment of coins and links, @Coinmaster.  I'd seen the Handatlas excerpted, mostly in Wiki, but never dreamed the whole thing was online.  Brilliant --as are your coins and numismatic work.  The German numismatic website is (to mix holiday metaphors) an epiphany.  All of this is bookmarked, and everything that isn't in Dutch is tabbed!  Many, many thanks for sharing some truly substantive content.

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Thanks so much for this! I have my mother's "Historischer Schul-Atlas" by F.W. Putzgers, printed in 1928 (48th ed.), with more than 100 plates (many quite similar to those in the Droysens Atlas), as well as a copy of the 63rd ed. from 1954 (in better condition), but I like being able to zoom in on these online maps and not have to use a magnifying glass! Wonderful. The maps covering the territorial development of Prussia and the Polish partitions are especially useful to me, admittedly not for numismatic reasons but for my family history research: my maternal grandfather's family and portions of my father's family lived in various towns and villages within the changing territories of Kurmark, Neumark, Hinterpommern, Westpreussen (including the Netze District), Sudpreussen (later Posen), and Neuostpreussen (later part of the Grand Duchy of Warsaw and Congress/Russian Poland), etc., etc., from at least as far back as 1671 into the 20th century.

I see that the maproom website also has the 44th edition of Putzgers' historical school-atlas, from 1923 (see http://www.maproom.org/00/19/index.php ), so people may find that one useful as well. 

Edited by DonnaML
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2 minutes ago, JeandAcre said:

Many thanks for that link, too, @DonnaML.  

I have a printed copy of the 8th, 1956 edition of Shepherd's Historical Atlas, which apparently was the last one, and was an event when I found it.  But these are magnificent complements, at the very least.

Not quite the last one! I have a copy of the 9th edition of the Shepherd Historical Atlas, published in 1964, although I don't know how much it was revised from the 8th.  It's very useful as well.  I see that the 1923/1926 edition is available online at https://maps.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/history_shepherd_1923.html , and the 8th (1956) edition at https://archive.org/details/HistoricalAtlasWilliamR.Shepherd/mode/1up.

In addition, I have the (London) Times Atlas of World History (4th ed. 1993) (formerly known as the Hammond Atlas), but it's huge, and rather unwieldy compared to the Putzgers and Shepherd Atlases.

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These are very interesting maps! I also like the page mentioned with Germany and Benelux - it makes Luxembourg look large!

This year I invested in my own copy of the Barrington Atlas. I use it not only for my coins but also to understand the topography and cities encountered by the characters in a novel I'm working on. I also love to pull it out and pore through a map on various days.

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Thanks again, Donna!  A later edition of Shepherd is a pleasant surprise --although maybe it shouldn't be, as solid as they were for anything American.  The 8th edition implies that the 7th was the most dramatic expansion; that's the best I can tell you.  Thank you for the link to the UT website, too.  Please don't throw anything too ripe, but I was too lazy to go looking for that.

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That's now on my wish list.  The first review was encouraging, emphasizing that, well, even in an abysmally unfamiliar language, atlases (and coins, and numismatic references) run heavily to proper nouns, making them relatively easy to navigate. 

Edited by JeandAcre
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3 minutes ago, JeandAcre said:

That's now on my wish list.  The first review was encouraging, emphasizing that, well, even in an abysmally unfamiliar language, atlases (and coins, and numismatic references) run heavily to proper nouns, making them relatively easy to navigate. 

I just ordered one of the available used copies, supposedly in "very good" condition, for about $20 less than the price of a new one.

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