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Can I store Mylar Saflips into Vinyl pocket coin pages without any damage to the coins ??


Kosmas
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  • Kosmas changed the title to Can I store Mylar Saflips into Vinyl pocket coin pages without any damage to the coins ??

I despise vinyl.  When I was a boy, I used to take my allowance money (and then later, my paper route money) and buy circulation coins--some silver, some nickel, and some copper, and some bronze-plated loonies . When I sold them maybe 15 years later, the silver had in places turned green, and so had the loonies.  This green was not a toning, but more like a corrosion. The nickel and copper coins were fine. (Edit: I did sell the silver coins at a very nice profit, though, as silver was dirt cheap when I was buying it as a kid.)

Fast forward another decade or so, I worked for seven years in a large coin shop, buying and selling contemporary coins.  I noticed that quite often, when we purchased older coin collections in binders containing vinyl pages, the vinyl had turned very greasy and sticky.  The little white cardboard 2x2's and 1.5x1.5's would often not want to come out of the sticky vinyl pages, so we had to cut them out using exacto knives.  Washing our hands immediately afterwards was necessary to get the vinyl residue off our hands.  Honestly, it was gross.  That said, the coins seemed ok.

I suppose there are other factors at work than just the vinyl (humidity; maybe cooking oils if the binders were stored close to a kitchen,and certainly the length of time involved), but overall, I consider vinyl the absolute worst possible way one can store coins.  But perhaps others in more arid climates have had better luck.

Now in your case, if those mylar containers are sealable, that should protect the coins.  But even so, that vinyl will degrade over time.  I don't know if that will affect the mylar or not, but it may affect your enjoyment as you turn the pages many years from now.

There are binder pages that do not contain vinyl on the market, and I would recommend that you use these rather than vinyl.

Edited by NathanB
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Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, NathanB said:

I despise vinyl.  When I was a boy, I used to take my allowance money (and then later, my paper route money) and buy circulation coins--some silver, some nickel, and some copper, and some bronze-plated loonies . When I sold them maybe 15 years later, the silver had in places turned green, and so had the loonies.  This green was not a toning, but more like a corrosion. The nickel and copper coins were fine. (Edit: I did sell the silver coins at a very nice profit, though, as silver was dirt cheap when I was buying it as a kid.)

Fast forward another decade or so, I worked for seven years in a large coin shop, buying and selling contemporary coins.  I noticed that quite often, when we purchased older coin collections in binders containing vinyl pages, the vinyl had turned very greasy and sticky.  The little white cardboard 2x2's and 1.5x1.5's would often not want to come out of the sticky vinyl pages, so we had to cut them out using exacto knives.  Washing our hands immediately afterwards was necessary to get the vinyl residue off our hands.  Honestly, it was gross.  That said, the coins seemed ok.

I suppose there are other factors at work than just the vinyl (humidity; maybe cooking oils if the binders were stored close to a kitchen,and certainly the length of time involved), but overall, I consider vinyl the absolute worst possible way one can store coins.  But perhaps others in more arid climates have had better luck.

Now in your case, if those mylar containers are sealable, that should protect the coins.  But even so, that vinyl will degrade over time.  I don't know if that will affect the mylar or not, but it may affect your enjoyment as you turn the pages many years from now.

There are binder pages that do not contain vinyl on the market, and I would recommend that you use these rather than vinyl.

Thank you ! But all of this binder pages are vinyl free ?

Edited by Kosmas
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I have a number of coins ancient, world, and US; Copper, silver, clad, zinc, and aluminum in Mylar flips stored in 20 pocket binder pages (mostly Cowens brand).  Most of them have been there for 15-25 years.  So far, I have had no issues with PVC plasticizer residue or unexpected toning.  I live in the North East, so high humidity isn't a significant concern.

 

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Yes, many of my earlier coins are in c. 1993-99 old style flips.  I've never noticed any bad effects (AE, AV, AR).  A couple of the Siliquae developed an attractive rainbow toning.  That's about it.

But one thing I did notice, the ink from the ID tags often fused to the flip, not affecting the coins, though.

Perhaps it's specific types of brands?  Or there's some factor which really sets off the worst effects.

 

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4 hours ago, Kosmas said:

@Ed Snible do you have any idea ?

I am uncertain.

Vinyl is said to turn into an ugly slime on the coins it touches.  I have only had green slime spontaneously appear once; and it happened to a Japanese mint set from the 1970s due to the mint's own packaging.  It happened quick, in the 1980s, after less than a decade.

I had world coin 2x2s in generic pages for over 30 years.  I changed them because the pages started to get cloudy.  I didn’t notice any problem on the 2x2s or the coins.

I have had a hard time buying pages online.  They are often fragile and rip.  Sometimes they are so loose that coins fall out.  Safety pages are so tight that friction holds Safeflips making it hard to get them out. Sometimes they are claimed to be archival, yet present the “pool toy” order I associate with vinyl.  Different brands sell different versions thus I can’t merely stick to a particular brand.

I suspect the Safeflip will protect the coin no matter how much vinyl is in the page.  However, I have no evidence.

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For what it's worth, I had a recent debate with a moderator of another site (that many of you may know) regarding the transfer mechanism of PVC plasticizer residue.  Based on the vapor pressure of phthalates, it would appear that a coin would either need to be in physical contact with the soft PVC, or the residue would have to be in sufficient quantity to flow and contact the coin.  Vapor phase transport of the phthalates does seem to be a viable mechanism (note: I'm not an organic chemist, so if my conclusions are wrong, please correct them)

So the takeaway is that the Mylar Saflip should act as a sufficient physical barrier from Vinyl pocket pages in most climates  

BTW, I don't think the other party in the aforementioned discussion was convinced even though I was able to provide data supporting my conclusion.  He provided nothing more than strongly worded opinions.  Oh well. 🙉

 

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