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A Flavian Drusus


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Posted (edited)

Another neat coin added to my sub collecting niche of Flavian Restoration coinage. Best of all, it was pretty cheap!

 

T437.jpg.f56d208041db3c0014bb7d0674c3c341.jpg

Drusus, Restored by Titus
Æ As, 9.40g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N; Head of Drusus, bare, l.
Rev: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST; S C in centre
RIC 437 var. BMC 286 var. BNC 298 var.
Acquired from Aegean, May 2022.
 
Titus struck an extensive restoration series of bronze coins of Flavian approved past emperors and imperial family members which reproduced the original coins in their entirety. While this veneration of past coinages was not a new idea (Vespasian copied past types on many reverses for the precious metal issues) it was quite an innovation to copy both the obverse and reverse of these past coinages. To do so likely had a dual purpose - one, to recoin types that were being recalled or falling out of circulation and to keep their memory alive, and secondly to link the Flavian house with those past revered personages. The meaning is quite clear on the reverse with Titus declaring he has restored (REST) this coin. Drusus was the son of the emperor Tiberius. This coin faithfully reproduces a similar type struck for him under his father.
 
Have a Drusus? I'd love to see it!
 
Thanks for looking!

 

 

Edited by David Atherton
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Posted (edited)

I wonder what was their point in minting these. I understand the general idea of the restoration coinage, with Flavian emperors trying to legitimize themselves as lawful successors of the Juliano-Claudians. After all, some historians even suggested that Vespasian was supported in his bid for power by Neronian (and by extension Juliano-Claudian) loyalists.

But Drusus was by then an obscure figure, hardly in living memory. What was to gain by bringing back a "literally who?".

 

Edit: spellcheck changed 'Juliano' to 'Judeo'.

Edited by Troyden
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Posted (edited)

It's good to see some Flavian fanaticism here at ACC, @David Atherton! Good to see you!

I do not have a coin of Drusus himself. Someday I'll rectify that situation when I'm not tracking down obscure Faustina coins. I do have coins of a few women in Drusus' life, of course.

Vipsania, mother of Drusus. I find @Jasper Burns' article convincing (The Celator. 2004 May;18(5):6 and reprinted online).

[IMG]
Tiberius, AD 14-37.
Roman orichalcum Dupondius, 14.32 g, 29.15 mm, 1 h.
Rome, AD 22/23.
Obv: PIETAS, veiled, diademed and draped bust of (Vipsania? as) Pietas, right.
Rev: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVGVSTI F TR POT ITER around large SC.
Refs: RIC Tiberius 43; BMCRE Tiberius 98; CBN Tiberius 74; Cohen 1; RCV 1741.

Wife of Drusus:

[IMG]
Antonia, Augusta AD 37 and 41.
Roman orichalcum dupondius, 12.10 gm, 28.3 mm.
Rome, AD 41-50.
Obv: ANTONIA AVGVSTA, bust of Antonia, draped and bare-headed right, hair in long plait.
Rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP S C, Claudius, veiled and togate, standing left, holding simpulum in right hand.
Refs: RIC 92; BMC 166; Cohen Antonia 6; RCV 1902; CBN 143; Carson 405.

Edited by Roman Collector
Remove a gif file that didn't imbed.
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While not a official or legal issue, I did fish this bottom of the barrel Drusus denarius fouree out of a junk bin at the last coin show I went to.

AE fouree, imitating a denarius of Drusus, imitating RIC I Claudius 74

eyJpZCI6ImNvaW4vNTk0Ni9vYnZlcnNlX2ltYWdlL2Jhc2ljLTcyMzg1Y2RmZTlmYTVmMWE4MmRhNmQ4NTc4YWU3OGZkLmpwZyIsInN0b3JhZ2UiOiJzdG9yZSJ9?version=3&filename=coin-bd-cabinet-a8C66Z-stitched-1600.jpg&signature=4194f987cd0cae29138453151c589fc59955eebfd79fe5b9297b764f5f9e9ec2
 

My example is a fouree imitating this type-

Nero Claudius Drusus. Died 9 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.75 g… | Flickr

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Troyden said:

I wonder what was their point in minting these. I understand the general idea of the restoration coinage, with Flavian emperors trying to legitimize themselves as lawful successors of the Judeo-Claudians. After all, some historians even suggested that Vespasian was supported in his bid for power by Neronian (and by extension Judeo-Claudian) loyalists.

But Drusus was by then an obscure figure, hardly in living memory. What was to gain by bringing back a "literally who?".

I'm assuming his coinage was still in active circulation during the Flavian era before it was recalled and then subsequently recoined by Titus. Perhaps not a household name today, but maybe he was in a Roman household of the late first century?

Edited by David Atherton
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8 hours ago, David Atherton said:

Another neat coin added to my sub collecting niche of Flavian Restoration coinage. Best of all, it was pretty cheap!

 

T437.jpg.f56d208041db3c0014bb7d0674c3c341.jpg

Drusus, Restored by Titus
Æ As, 9.40g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N; Head of Drusus, bare, l.
Rev: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST; S C in centre
RIC 437 (C3). BMC 286. BNC 298.
Acquired from Aegean, May 2022.
 
Titus struck an extensive restoration series of bronze coins of Flavian approved past emperors and imperial family members which reproduced the original coins in their entirety. While this veneration of past coinages was not a new idea (Vespasian copied past types on many reverses for the precious metal issues) it was quite an innovation to copy both the obverse and reverse of these past coinages. To do so likely had a dual purpose - one, to recoin types that were being recalled or falling out of circulation and to keep their memory alive, and secondly to link the Flavian house with those past revered personages. The meaning is quite clear on the reverse with Titus declaring he has restored (REST) this coin. Drusus was the son of the emperor Tiberius. This coin faithfully reproduces a similar type struck for him under his father.
 
Have a Drusus? I'd love to see it!
 
Thanks for looking!

 

 

Great piece! I don't have a Drusus but I'd love one someday. Although that day might be quite a while into the future when I can actually get one 😂

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I have a coin with Drusus and Germanicus portraits. Not the best out there, but ...

image.png.bb137f066d02e7340d87221b860e60ee.png

MYSIA. Pergamum. Germanicus & Drusus (Caesares, 14-19). Ae. Struck under Tiberius.
Obv: ΓEPMANIKOΣ KAIΣAP.
Bare head of Germanicus right.
Rev: ΔPOVΣOΣ KAIΣAP.
Bare head of Drusus right.
RPC I 2367.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

David,

A coincidence!

The rev. legend on restored bronzes of Titus generally starts at upper right if the type is merely S C surrounded by one or two lines of legend, but at lower left if an actual old reverse type is reproduced along with the regular S C.

The only exception I can find in RIC and in Komnick's Restitutionsmünzen is RIC 435, pl. 111: As of Tiberius restored, rev. winged caduceus and S C, but legend nevertheless starts at upper right, rather than the expected lower left.

But now, all at once, two further exceptions: a mediocre Germanicus As that I just acquired from Savoca, see their picture below; and the Drusus As with which you started this thread. Both with S C only on reverse, but reverse legend nevertheless starting at lower left instead of the expected upper right.

I didn't recognize that your Drusus was anything special when you posted it two weeks ago; but now I ran across it again right after checking and then purchasing my Germanicus As from Savoca! The reverse legend, obscured by pits and deposits, is

IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST;

from a different reverse die than your Drusus.

GERMbyTitusIMPTbegins 6h.jpg

Edited by curtislclay
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/12/2022 at 6:39 PM, curtislclay said:

David,

A coincidence!

The rev. legend on restored bronzes of Titus generally starts at upper right if the type is merely S C surrounded by one or two lines of legend, but at lower left if an actual old reverse type is reproduced along with the regular S C.

The only exception I can find in RIC and in Komnick's Restitutionsmünzen is RIC 435, pl. 111: As of Tiberius restored, rev. winged caduceus and S C, but legend nevertheless starts at upper right, rather than the expected lower left.

But now, all at once, two further exceptions: a mediocre Germanicus As that I just acquired from Savoca, see their picture below; and the Drusus As with which you started this thread. Both with S C only on reverse, but reverse legend nevertheless starting at lower left instead of the expected upper right.

I didn't recognize that your Drusus was anything special when you posted it two weeks ago; but now I ran across it again right after checking and then purchasing my Germanicus As from Savoca! The reverse legend, obscured by pits and deposits, is

IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST;

from a different reverse die than your Drusus.

GERMbyTitusIMPTbegins 6h.jpg

Thank you Curtis for pointing out this difference regarding the orientation of the reverse legend! I will catalogue the T437 as a variant.

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As of Germanicus Rome Restitution issue minted during the reign of Titus. Obv, Head of Germanicus left bare Rv Large SC  surrounded by inscription honoring Titus RIC 228  9.20 grms 26 mm Photo by W. Hansengermanicus7.jpg.004275e895057e43f52b5bd81c794379.jpg

 It is interesting that this restitution as copies the coin struck by Caligula honoring his father Germanicus and not the one issued by Claudius. I understand that these coins were struck at Rome and at a eastern mint possibly Perinthos. However the site of the eastern mint is still under some debate. I have not examined these coins very closely however I believe my coin is a product from the mint of Rome.

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Posted (edited)

My only coin of Drusus Minor was issued after his death by his father, Tiberius:

Drusus Minor or the Younger, full name Drusus Julius Caesar (13 BCE-23 AD, son of Tiberius and Vipsiana), AE As, 23 AD, Rome Mint, issued by Tiberius. Obv. Bare head left, DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N / Rev. PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large SC. RIC I Tiberius 45, Sear RCV I 1794 (ill. p. 353), BMCRE Tiberius 99, Cohen 2. 28 mm., 10.4 g.

image.jpeg.99c58ca02169ff14cc2f15b8d9890ff0.jpeg

Edited by DonnaML
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On 5/27/2022 at 5:14 AM, Roman Collector said:


Vipsania, mother of Drusus. I find @Jasper Burns' article convincing (The Celator. 2004 May;18(5):6 and reprinted online).

[IMG]
Tiberius, AD 14-37.
Roman orichalcum Dupondius, 14.32 g, 29.15 mm, 1 h.
Rome, AD 22/23.
Obv: PIETAS, veiled, diademed and draped bust of (Vipsania? as) Pietas, right.
Rev: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVGVSTI F TR POT ITER around large SC.
Refs: RIC Tiberius 43; BMCRE Tiberius 98; CBN Tiberius 74; Cohen 1; RCV 1741.

 

rb0895rp1917.jpg.c7d060a93380a5650c940aaf0280b5ff.jpg

I'm less certain regarding the intent here being Vipsania, Livilla or the old standard Livia but I suspect by the time Titus issued this REST, no one cared.  I prefer Livilla because calling her Pietas was about as political as you can get. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

– Copper coin (AE As) minted at Rome for DRUSUS (son of Tiberius) IN 22 A.D. Obv. DRVSVS.CAESAR.TI.AVG.F.DIVI.AVG.N. bare hd. left. Rev. PONTIF.TRIBVN.POTEST.ITER.S.C. SC around legend. SEAR #600. DVM #2. RICII #35. Pg.110.

 

ABBS-359 OBVvc.jpg

ABBS-359 REVvc.jpg

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