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GOT TODAY....A COIN OF LEOPOLD III (HABSBURG) WHO CAME BEFORE LEOPOLD I..


ominus1

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leopold III (1 November 1351 – 9 July 1386), known as the Just, a member of the House of Habsburg, was Duke of Austria from 1365. As head and progenitor of the Leopoldian line, he ruled over the Inner Austrian duchies of Carinthia, Styria and Carniola as well as the County of Tyrol and Further Austria from 1379 until his death. 

POST AWAY PEEPS! 🙂

 

gulden vierer 16mm, .44gms

OBVERSE;

 

Cross in a twisted circle, a rosette in each quadrant, legend around, cross above, rosette below.

Script: Latin (uncial)

Lettering: LEOPOLDVS

Lettering (regular font): LEOPOLDVS

Reverse:

Tyro eagle in a twisted circle, cross above, rosette below.

Script: Latin (uncial)

Lettering: COMES TIROL

Lettering (regular font): COMES TIROL

 

Minted under Leopold III (or possibly IV, for he minted the coin also from1396-1406 as i understand it) Margrave and regent of Tyrol

leopold lll coin.jpg

Edited by ominus1
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3 hours ago, ominus1 said:

leopold III (1 November 1351 – 9 July 1386), known as the Just, a member of the House of Habsburg, was Duke of Austria from 1365. As head and progenitor of the Leopoldian line, he ruled over the Inner Austrian duchies of Carinthia, Styria and Carniola as well as the County of Tyrol and Further Austria from 1379 until his death. 

POST AWAY PEEPS! 🙂

 

gulden vierer 16mm, .44gms

OBVERSE;

 

Cross in a twisted circle, a rosette in each quadrant, legend around, cross above, rosette below.

Script: Latin (uncial)

Lettering: LEOPOLDVS

Lettering (regular font): LEOPOLDVS

Reverse:

Tyro eagle in a twisted circle, cross above, rosette below.

Script: Latin (uncial)

Lettering: COMES TIROL

Lettering (regular font): COMES TIROL

 

Minted under Leopold III (or possibly IV, for he minted the coin also from1396-1406 as i understand it) Margrave and regent of Tyrol

leopold lll coin.jpg

To me, Further Austria has always sounded more impressive as Vorderösterreich. For those who don't know, the most important city in Vorderösterreich was Freiburg in Breisgau, which belonged to Austria along with the surrounding area until the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, when it became part of the Grand Duchy of Baden.  Even though I suspect nobody ever thought of it as culturally Austrian.  A number of my ancestors lived in villages near Freiburg during the 400-year period when they were banned from living in Freiburg itself, a ban that wasn't lifted until the Jews of Baden were finally emancipated in 1862. 

Edited by DonnaML
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@ominus1, it's fantastic that you're collecting this stuff in this much depth.  Medieval as late as this is really out of my purview, but your focus is really admirable.  --Far from being condescending, that's a direct reference to how scattered I am. 

But, you mentioned Carinthia (purely rhetorical question mark --)!

image.jpeg.fcb6c7bba926e2902a24e60d9debdd68.jpegimage.jpeg.fbe02fb7f48687a9c87785b9c0d25f1e.jpeg

This is a pfennig of Bernhard von Sponheim, Duke of Carinthia 1202-1256, minted in St. Veit. From a listing in ACsearch (lacking the reference it cites):

Obv: Bernhard standing, wearing a mail hauberk, holding a sword and shield. Rev: Cross fourchée, with star in each angle. Bonhoff 2142.

The fess (horizontal bar) on the shield corresponds to the early coat of arms of Sponheim.  But, as I've said in more than one reposting of this, across CoinTalk and Numisforums, I really like the minimalism of the obverse.  Yes, on the level of propoganda.  'Mess with me, and Watch what'll happen!'

Across medieval France and the German empire, duchies were often founded on the frontiers, or marches (cf. the French 'marquisat,' the Geman 'mark,' and even the 'marcher lords' on the Anglo-Norman border with Wales).

To quote @DonnaML

"To me, Further Austria has always sounded more impressive as Vorderösterreich. For those who don't know, the most important city in Vorderösterreich was Freiburg in Breisgau, which belonged to Austria along with the surrounding area -- where a number of my ancestors lived -- until the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, when it became part of the Grand Duchy of Baden.  Even though I suspect nobody ever thought of it as culturally Austrian."

I've never had a good handle on the extent to which the eastern German frontiers, back to medieval times, consisted, well, for instance, more of Slavic than Teutonic populations.  Donna, any more enlightenment you could provide on that, regardless of the chronological context, would be cordially welcome.   

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15 minutes ago, JeandAcre said:

@ominus1, it's fantastic that you're collecting this stuff in this much depth.  Medieval as late as this is really out of my purview, but your focus is really admirable.  --Far from being condescending, that's a direct reference to how scattered I am. 

But, you mentioned Carinthia (purely rhetorical question mark --)!

image.jpeg.fcb6c7bba926e2902a24e60d9debdd68.jpegimage.jpeg.fbe02fb7f48687a9c87785b9c0d25f1e.jpeg

This is a pfennig of Bernhard von Sponheim, Duke of Carinthia 1202-1256, minted in St. Veit. From a listing in ACsearch (lacking the reference it cites):

Obv: Bernhard standing, wearing a mail hauberk, holding a sword and shield. Rev: Cross fourchée, with star in each angle. Bonhoff 2142.

The fess (horizontal bar) on the shield corresponds to the early coat of arms of Sponheim.  But, as I've said in more than one reposting of this, across CoinTalk and Numisforums, I really like the minimalism of the obverse.  Yes, on the level of propoganda.  'Mess with me, and Watch what'll happen!'

Across medieval France and the German empire, duchies were often founded on the frontiers, or marches (cf. the French 'marquisat,' the Geman 'mark,' and even the 'marcher lords' on the Anglo-Norman border with Wales).

To quote @DonnaML

"To me, Further Austria has always sounded more impressive as Vorderösterreich. For those who don't know, the most important city in Vorderösterreich was Freiburg in Breisgau, which belonged to Austria along with the surrounding area -- where a number of my ancestors lived -- until the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, when it became part of the Grand Duchy of Baden.  Even though I suspect nobody ever thought of it as culturally Austrian."

I've never had a good handle on the extent to which the eastern German frontiers, back to medieval times, consisted, well, for instance, more of Slavic than Teutonic populations.  Donna, any more enlightenment you could provide on that, regardless of the chronological context, would be cordially welcome.   

Without even taking into account the territories annexed by Brandenburg-Prussia as a result of the Partitions of Poland in the 18th century, where a lot of people never stopped speaking Polish as a first language, the original inhabitants of territories conquered by the Teutonic Knights etc. back in the medieval era included not only Slavs like the Wends and the closely-related Sorbs (even before territories came under Polish rule), but also Baltic peoples -- like the so-called "Old Prussians" from whom the name Prussia was derived.  Obviously the numbers of non-German speakers living under Prussian rule declined over the centuries, but I can't tell you how much of that was due to internal migration and how much from assimilation. I think the Wendish language pretty much disappeared before the 19th century, but there were still people in Saxony and elsewhere speaking Sorbian in the 20th century, although according to Wikipedia the Nazis "denied the existence of the Sorbs as a distinct Slavic people by referring to them as 'Sorbian-speaking Germans.'" As for the Old Prussians, according to Wikipedia, "because of the conquest of the Old Prussians by Germans, the Old Prussian language probably became extinct in the beginning of the 18th century with the devastation of the rural population by plagues and the assimilation of the nobility and the larger population with Germans or Lithuanians. However, translations of the Bible, Old Prussian poems, and some other texts survived and have enabled scholars to reconstruct the language."

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@DonnaML, this is Fantastic.  In other words, as late as this, never mind the 13th and 14th centuries, other ethnicities were complementing the Slavic presence.  ...I need it when stuff I know nothing about takes on this level of complexity and nuance.  Gave up on knowing everything a Long Minute ago!

And, Yes, I have to resonate with your focus on language ...in contrast to the interminable details of history or --Just, Good Luck-- genetics.  As you note, linguistic evolution can be about assimilation as much as ethnic dynamics in other senses, but it tells you A Lot, more quickly and efficiently than other measurements are readily capable of doing.

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