Jump to content

Vespasian Judaea Capta As


David Atherton

Recommended Posts

Everyone who collects ancient coins are quite familiar with Vespasian's iconic Judaea Capta denarii and sestertii issues. But did you know the asses also have their own Judaea Capta issues?

 

V305a.jpg.4eaa5cf083a304a9042faf0f401ece54.jpg

Vespasian
Æ As, 9.64g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass, head resting on hand, surrounded by arms
RIC 305 (C). BMC 605. BNC 580. Hendin 1554a.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, May 2023. Ex Jean Elsen & ses Fils S.A. Auction 154, 17 March 2023, lot 602.

Judaea Capta coins were struck in all metals, but are quite scarce on the middle bronzes. This as from 71 echoes a similar Judaea Capta denarius struck the previous year. Here IVDEA CAPTA is spelled out, on the denarii only IVDAEA is in exergue (note the different spelling between the two denominations). The cuirass and surrounding pile of arms are also missing from the denarius examples. This as is rated as common in RIC but can be most difficult to find in trade.

In hand.

 

 

As always thanks for looking!

Edited by David Atherton
  • Like 16
  • Clap 2
  • Heart Eyes 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi All,

Mine with Titus. RIC II, Part 1 (2nd Ed)-1268 OCRE .

image.png.9554599b949d885f4bc857b002ad965e.png

TITUS (79-81 AD), GALLIA, LUGDUNUM ?, ca 77-78 AD
Æ AS
Broucheion Collection ROM-2002-01-20.001

OBV: Titus bust laureate, facing right. Legend: TCAESIMPAVGFTRPCOSVICENSOR. Dotted border.
REV: Judaea, clothed in a tunic, with short sleeves: she sits, in the attitude of extreme sorrow, at the foot of a palm tree representing Palestine. Trophy arms behind her. Legend: IVDAEA - [CAPT]A. In exergue: SC. Dotted border.

- Broucheion

Edited by Broucheion
  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, David Atherton said:

Everyone who collects ancient coins are quite familiar with Vespasian's iconic Judaea Capta denarii and sestertii issues. But did you know the asses also have their own Judaea Capta issues?

 

V305a.jpg.4eaa5cf083a304a9042faf0f401ece54.jpg

Vespasian
Æ As, 9.64g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass, head resting on hand, surrounded by arms
RIC 305 (C). BMC 605. BNC 580. Hendin 1554a.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, May 2023. Ex Jean Elsen & ses Fils S.A. Auction 154, 17 March 2023, lot 602.

Judaea Capta coins were struck in all metals, but are quite scarce on the middle bronzes. This as from 71 echoes a similar Judaea Capta denarius struck the previous year. Here IVDEA CAPTA is spelled out, on the denarii only IVDAEA is in exergue (note the different spelling between the two denominations). The cuirass and surrounding pile of arms are also missing from the denarius examples. This as is rated as common in RIC but can be most difficult to find in trade.

In hand.

 

 

As always thanks for looking!

Nice catch! I was wondering about the spelling, though. Is there a difference in meaning, between IVDAEA and IVDEA? And is IVDEA only used on the middle bronzes?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Limes said:

Nice catch! I was wondering about the spelling, though. Is there a difference in meaning, between IVDAEA and IVDEA? And is IVDEA only used on the middle bronzes?

No difference in meaning. I (sadly) haven't studied or practiced Latin for quite some time, but this is a neat example of pronunciation preferences evolving over time. I'm not sure about your second question.

 

Great coin @David Atherton

Edited by rvk
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 There is no difference in meaning between IVDAEA and IVDEA. Around this time the Latin diphthong AE was undergoing a change in pronunciation. In the Classical period @ 1st century BC it was nearly always pronounced like "eye". In the countryside this sort of morphed into an "AY" sound. In archaic Latin many words with the "eye"sounding diphthong were spelled with an AI. If I recall , I think Cicero lamented the rustic change in pronunciation. Ironically Vespasian himself had a rural accent. In later Latin the AE diphthong is still retained in spelling but pronounced "AY". In Italian the A is dropped .  I think some of the engravers probably spelled it phonetically. We have a similar variant in spelling of the word Libertas /Leibertas on some republican coins (ie Brutus).

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...