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Caracalla prepares to depart from Rome to Germania


maridvnvm

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In circa Summer A.D. 212 Caracalla minted an issue announcing his departure from Rome on a campaign in Germania. In this issue are two coin types with the reverse legends PROFECTIO AVG, procaliming this departure. One type is "Caracalla standing right, holding spear, two standards behind him" and the other is "Caracalla standing slightly right, holding spear in both hands; attendant holding signum standing behind". The former type seems to be more common than the latter type. The evidence suggesting the relative scarcity can be taken from two sources, firstly the Reka Devnia hoard, which can generally be used as an indication of relative scarcity for coins of this period and the second being the relative occurrence in the market. The first type (Cohen 508) has 61 examples in the RD hoard and the latter type has 19 examples in the RD hoard. 19 is not a really low number but would show a coin as being scarce rather than common. Looking at the market there would seem to be ratios of the two types that would reinforce the RD indication.

Caracalla denarius

Obv:- ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT. Laureate head right.
Rev:- PROFECTIO AVG. Caracalla standing slightly right, holding spear in both hands; attendant holding signum standing behind.
Minted in Rome, A.D. 212-213
References:– RIC 226, RSC 509. 19 examples in RD.

Weight 3.383g. 19.01mm. 0 degrees

A nice example of the adult, bearded Caracalla. Die breaks on the reverse of the P and F of the legend to the beaded edge.

RI_066bz_img.JPG

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28 minutes ago, maridvnvm said:

In circa Summer A.D. 212 Caracalla minted an issue announcing his departure from Rome on a campaign in Germania. In this issue are two coin types with the reverse legends PROFECTIO AVG, procaliming this departure. One type is "Caracalla standing right, holding spear, two standards behind him" and the other is "Caracalla standing slightly right, holding spear in both hands; attendant holding signum standing behind". The former type seems to be more common than the latter type. The evidence suggesting the relative scarcity can be taken from two sources, firstly the Reka Devnia hoard, which can generally be used as an indication of relative scarcity for coins of this period and the second being the relative occurrence in the market. The first type (Cohen 508) has 61 examples in the RD hoard and the latter type has 19 examples in the RD hoard. 19 is not a really low number but would show a coin as being scarce rather than common. Looking at the market there would seem to be ratios of the two types that would reinforce the RD indication.

Caracalla denarius

Obv:- ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT. Laureate head right.
Rev:- PROFECTIO AVG. Caracalla standing slightly right, holding spear in both hands; attendant holding signum standing behind.
Minted in Rome, A.D. 212-213
References:– RIC 226, RSC 509. 19 examples in RD.

Weight 3.383g. 19.01mm. 0 degrees

A nice example of the adult, bearded Caracalla. Die breaks on the reverse of the P and F of the legend to the beaded edge.

RI_066bz_img.JPG

Martin, Nice score 😊! The coin is an excellent strike, shows little wear & has attractive toning.

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The OP coin is very impressive  with an interesting history.

Here ia a recent Caracalla acquisition of mine:

Obv.: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX

Measurements: 5.35g, 23mm

RIC IV 311.

I like this coin, because it shows a particularly expressive bust and Caracalla is wearing a lorica plumata (scale armour), which is rarely seen on coins. I have, in fact, the same reverse type, but with an obverse, which shows Caracalla wearing a draped cloak. 

22.PNG

Edited by Tejas
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I also have a PROFECTIO reverse, but the other, more common type. Apparently, I paid 35 pounds in 1997 for this coin 🙂

Caracalla's facial expression is hauntingly realistic on this coin. The die sinkers were true artists.

 

caracalla.PNG

Edited by Tejas
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@Tejas That Venus type is a lovely example. I bouight one like it about 20 years ago when I was buying anything I could lay my hands on to help me figure out what I wanted to collect. I didn't hold on to it and parted with it soon after according to my records. It is one of the few coins from that period that I have sellers regret over.

I can tell from the image that it was taken before I managed to have any success with photographing coins with my camera. In fact this image was taken with a flatbed scanner.

RI%20066bc%20img.jpg

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