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Attention - Stolen! Sestertius Pupienus RIC 20 CONCORDIA AVGG


YOTHR
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A Pupienus RIC 20 sestertius was stolen in transit (CONCORDIA AVGG). 

You can find the data of the sestertius here - KLICK ME

 

Marcus Clodius Pupienus Maximus
Sestertius of the Roman Imperial Period 238 AD
Material: Silver
Diameter: 29/31mm
Weight: 19.68g
Mint: Rome
Reference: RIC IV Pupienus 20

 

Since the sestertius shared its path with dozens of other consignments, we assume it was a targeted action. Someone knew what was in which consignment. If you are offered the sestertius - it would be great if you could contact me: mail@yothr.me - otherwise you can also inform the police. If you are offered the coin - please get the seller's details first and only then report it 😉 

Here is a picture - it is a striking coin - I think you can remember it. 
Be careful - if it is offered to you. 

 

PS: We informed all Dealers at VCoins, MA-Shop and all important Auctionhouses.

 

 

image.jpeg.31dac7846db483bd55217629d36b3e87.jpeg

 

 

Edited by YOTHR
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2 hours ago, YOTHR said:

A Pupienus RIC 20 sestertius was stolen in transit (CONCORDIA AVGG). 

You can find the data of the sestertius here - KLICK ME

 

Marcus Clodius Pupienus Maximus
Sestertius of the Roman Imperial Period 238 AD
Material: Silver
Diameter: 29/31mm
Weight: 19.68g
Mint: Rome
Reference: RIC IV Pupienus 20

 

Since the sestertius shared its path with dozens of other consignments, we assume it was a targeted action. Someone knew what was in which consignment. If you are offered the sestertius - it would be great if you could contact me: mail@yothr.me - otherwise you can also inform the police. If you are offered the coin - please get the seller's details first and only then report it 😉 

Here is a picture - it is a striking coin - I think you can remember it. 
Be careful - if it is offered to you. 

 

PS: We informed all Dealers at VCoins, MA-Shop and all important Auctionhouses.

 

 

image.jpeg.31dac7846db483bd55217629d36b3e87.jpeg

 

 

What a stunning coin 😮 & easy to recognize 😉.

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Just now, shanxi said:

Or it was the weight of the Sestertius? It felt heavier than the others and was therefore interesting?

I don't think so - I packed the sestertius in a flat box for book shipments and in turn packed the sestertius in a cardboard box - so that the weight was distributed. The whole cardboard envelope was heavy - the sestertius in the middle. So the whole item was rather heavy - the whole cardboard envelope. It's hard to find out what's inside by feeling it.

But I'm afraid I'll never find out. Maybe the good Pupienus will turn up again one day.

The financial loss is non-existent - I have extra "valoren" insurance. But it's just a pity when such a bastard (sorry) gets hold of such a coin. Above all, it's bad for all honest collectors who buy this sestertius, pay for it and never own it, and then possibly also have a loss.

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  • Benefactor

I feel for your feelings of loss and a host of other emotions.  This is one situation that I've gone through a couple of times this year, although in the last instance I did receive other coins as compensation, much to the seller's credit.  Still, the thought that coins of numismatic value and interest disappeared, somewhere in the vast world, lost in circumstances beyond one's control can lead to some dark places.  As with other losses, time will be the ultimate healer. 

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  • Benefactor

I'm just wondering, why do you think the shipment was targeted?

As I understand, the coin was shipped from one address in Germany to another in Germany. I'm assuming that the package reached the sender, but the coin had been removed.

Recently, my son (who owns a sports card business) shipped a few hundred dollars in cards to Australia. Before the package reached the buyer, someone removed the cards from the package and replaced them with a religious book. Based on where the book was published, the theft appears to have occurred within Australia.

Unless a sender/receiver undergoes multiple thefts, I think it's difficult to assume targeting. While it may be something as savvy as packages being scanned for collectible items, then opened, I suspect it's more likely that in the mail-chain has a good idea what the boxes for collectibles look like, and simply opens them, then reseals those that are suspect.

Luckily, if anyone ever targeted my address, my coins would be fine because they don't look like sports cards. 🙂 

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