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A Siliqua of Valentinian III.


Magnus Maximus
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Hello all, 

No historical write up today. 

What I have here though is a rare siliqua of Valentinian III, struck by his cousin(Theodosius II), to celebrate his placement on the throne of the Western Roman Empire.

Our esteemed user @seth77, sumed up this rare issue more effectively than I ever could: "series of issues minted for Theodosius II at Constantinople has Valentinian added in both silver and copper. These are all rare, the issue was likely short-lived, probably a celebratory coinage to mark the fact that the East put an emperor in the West. The reverse has nothing to do with Valentinian III, it's just a continuation of the vota suscepta and soluta years for Theodosius II, started in honor of his vicennalia (this coinage starts probably in 421). Before that and the probable reason why the whole series was dated starting with 420 it's a late issue for Honorius, linking thus two separate events into a single coinage with the same design."

Please post your coinage of Valentinian III and/or Theodosius II. 

VALENTINIAN I, 364-375 AD. Siliqua. Constantinople. Obv: D N VALENTINIANVS P F ...

Obv: D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG.
Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VOT X MVLT XX / CONS.
Legend within wreath.

Condition: VF.
Weight: 1.99 g.
Diameter: 17.90 mm.

 

And the coin in hand.

IMG_5887.JPG.562c820ea5f096e503599a61b11d1659.JPG

IMG_5888.JPG.000ed0d0e7384f637b4356754a6d65c7.JPG

Edited by Magnus Maximus
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Nice Silqua !

 

My little Valentinian III

normal_Valentinianus_III_R124.jpg.6127818940853ee89175931a006899b3.jpg

Valentinianus III
Æ-Nummus, Kyzikos, 10mm
Obv: DN VALENTINIANO P F AVG, Bust of Valentinian, draped, cuirrased, right-
Rev: Victory advancing forward, holding wreath in both hands. SMKA
RIC X (theososius II), p. 274, 438, R3

 

 

Edited by shanxi
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Here's a few of my Val III ae4 types (I think I have about 25 different ones). For an Emperor with so many different varieties of ae4's it's odd that they are so difficult to find.

1. VICTORIA AVGG; Two Victories facing and jointly holding a wreath (RIC 2132):

558705352_ValIIITwoVictoriesBB1.jpg.7be3854a5936527e7d43a52dc0ecc851.jpg

2. CAS - TRA; Campgate with star above (RIC 2163)

379157931_ValIIICampGateCASBB.jpg.ae46a0b15e3f3851f2f2d8f0b63fadfa.jpg

3. CONCORDIA AVG; Victory facing holding a wreath in each hand:

1424746733_ValIIIFacingVictoryWreathsBB1A.jpg.d0dff6d0f530b53948a85ed265c1be28.jpg

 

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23 minutes ago, O-Towner said:

Here's a few of my Val III ae4 types (I think I have about 25 different ones). For an Emperor with so many different varieties of ae4's it's odd that they are so difficult to find.

1. VICTORIA AVGG; Two Victories facing and jointly holding a wreath (RIC 2132):

558705352_ValIIITwoVictoriesBB1.jpg.7be3854a5936527e7d43a52dc0ecc851.jpg

2. CAS - TRA; Campgate with star above (RIC 2163)

379157931_ValIIICampGateCASBB.jpg.ae46a0b15e3f3851f2f2d8f0b63fadfa.jpg

3. CONCORDIA AVG; Victory facing holding a wreath in each hand:

1424746733_ValIIIFacingVictoryWreathsBB1A.jpg.d0dff6d0f530b53948a85ed265c1be28.jpg

 

 

Isn't it a bit ironic that the East struck way better coinage for Valentinian III than the West where he actually ruled?

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Theodosius II, AD 402-450. AV Solidus (21mm, 4.31g, 6h). Tricennalia issue. Constantinople mint, 3rd officina. Struck AD 430-440. Obv: D N THEODO SIVS P F AVG; Pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman motif. Rev: VOT XXX MVLT XXXX; Constantinopolis seated left on throne, foot on prow, holding globus cruciger and scepter; shield to right side of throne; star to right; Γ//CONOB. Ref: RIC X 257; Depeyrot 81/1. Near Extra Fine. Underlying luster, obverse die break, some hairlines. Ex CNG Keystone 6 Auction (11 Mar 2022), Lot 2034.

image.jpeg.f35ce5902d2ecf3c2851e423148893c5.jpeg

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Here are two solidi of Valentinian III.  The first is a regular issue from Ravenna, and the second is a Visigothic solidus struck in his name.  The latter is MEC I #170.   It came from the Wm. Subjack collection auctioned by Italo Vecchi, Nummorum Auctiones 14 lot #8, February 1999.                                                                          image.jpeg.5f87058ccc1492f208b27e4a779bc5b5.jpegimage.jpeg.95876c400ba94208169606a0a8cc35d1.jpeg

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Here are my solidi of Theodosius II along with one lonely tremissis. The first and third coins are from the mint in Thessalonica;   the dies on these are never as precise as those from Constantinople, whence the rest of them come.  The three solidi in the bottom row all commemorate consulships, and I have a better picture.  It appears both emperors are wearing the loros, although the senior emperor is sporting more jewels on his.   The little guy is Valentinian III.

6C83E579-3885-4CC2-A98A-44F92857937F.jpeg.cfacc925cc299ace22fa49ea7dc0a743.jpeg

FB3597E9-D817-4360-A105-918ECB64C5A8.jpeg.3a5f8da4ed0f1a7f00a3b1cd6eb16466.jpeg

image.jpeg.f65a836099d39d72669a4ff1c2fceb71.jpeg

My notes on these:  Three coins all from Constantinople feature the emperor with lance and shield, three quarters face, helmeted and cuirassed.  The reverse shows Theodosius II as senior Augustus seated on the right (viewer’s left.).  In the first two, the junior emperor Valentinian III is standing.  These are associated with Theodosius’ XI consulship and the proclamation of Valentinian III in 425 AD.  That year, the Huns advanced on Constantinople but were defeated by a plague.  

In the third coin, Valentinian III is also seated, and the emperors’ heads are haloed.  This coin is associated with Theodosius’ XII consulship in 426 AD.  Saint Augustine published De Civitate Dei in this year.

Above the emperors is a star or comet.  In the coins of 425 AD there appears to be a trail of dots behind the star.  I have not seen this addressed anywhere.  Halley’s Comet visited in 451 AD, so not connected.   Alternatively, these are privy marks of the mint.  Only the third coin has an officina letter (A) and lacks dots. 

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