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Monarchy of the British Isles, from Celtic times to today, including the Commonwealth of Oliver Cromwell


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30 minutes ago, John Conduitt said:


That leaves us:

Scotland: Mary I of Scots, Robert III, Robert II, Robert I, John Balliol, Alexander II, William I, Malcolm IV

England post-Alfred: Mary (sole reign), Henry VI (2nd reign), Harold II, Harold I, Edmund II Ironside/Aethered II 2nd Reign, Cnut, Edgar, Eadred, Æthelstan, (Æthelflæd), Edward the Elder, plus all the Viking issues in York and East Anglia.

Before that are a few other attributed Saxon coins (except Burgred, Aethelwulf, Eadwald and Offa), Northumbria (except Redwulf), the Romans and the Celts (except Cunobelin).

Londinium: Allectus, Constantius I, Severus II, Constantine I and Magnus Maximus.

I can add in a few but I’ll wait to see what else pops up.

I do not have Malcolm IV or Robert the Bruce of Scotland.  I also do not have Harold II of England.  I am missing most of the Vikings.  And of course there are some rare coins of petty rulers of Saxon England that continue to elude me.

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22 hours ago, Nap said:

I can add in a few but I’ll wait to see what else pops up.

I do not have Malcolm IV or Robert the Bruce of Scotland.  I also do not have Harold II of England.  I am missing most of the Vikings.  And of course there are some rare coins of petty rulers of Saxon England that continue to elude me.

I'm looking forward to seeing what you have. Let me know if I've missed any rulers!

Severus II Follis, 305-306
image.png.e69c795614e31bfb54eb5df51e5bd0e4.pngLondinium. Bronze, 28mm, 10.37g. Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right; SEVERVS NOBILISSIMVS C. Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae; GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (RIC VI, 60).

Edited by John Conduitt
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Constantius I as Augustus Follis, 305-306
image.png.506d63bb078a183bf240dc2c1edd948b.pngLondinium. Bronze, 27mm, 9.50g. Laureate, cuirassed bust right; IMP CONSTANTIVS P F AVG. Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae; GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI (RIC VI, 52a). Ex Lord Stewartby. From the Falmouth (Cornwall) Hoard 1865. Two labourers ploughing a field discovered 600-1000 3rd-4th century bronze coins. They were surrounded by black material that crumbled in their hands. The Christie’s catalogue in 1970 listed 584 coins ‘The Property of Mrs Janet MK Fox of Falmouth...all in a rather corroded state and stacked in neat rows.’

Archbishop Wigmund Styca, 837-846
image.png.637baffc5ea0bdddf8ffc4c5b2824205.png
York. Copper, 1.05g. Central cross; VIGMVND. Rosette of pellets; EDELHELM (moneyer Ethelhelm/Aethelhelm) (S 870). Wigmund was Archbishop of York sometime between 837 and 858.

Archbishop Eanbald II Sceat, 795-808
image.png.b78513acfee338b3438e89c6ddb93128.png
York. Silver, 13.5mm, 1.10g. EA • (NB) A • LD • (retrograde) around central cross pattée. + EDILVARD (Æthelweard, moneyer) around central cross pattée (EMC 1997.0430, same obv. die).
 

Eadberht Class Di Series Y Secondary Sceat, 737-758
image.png.e07a156b48b23e3bd16d06fc2d815f8b.png
York. Silver, 1.00g. Fantastic animal left, cross under tail and triquetra below. Large cross in centre; .EOTBEREhTVF (S 847).

Constantine I Follis, 319-320
image.png.57e37f214ab2bb422cb7311de2dc0ce3.pngLondinium. Bronze, 18mm, 3.03g. Laureate, cuirassed bust right, wearing high-crested helmet; CONSTANT-INVS MAX AG. Two Victories holding shield inscribed VOT PR over altar, with altar decoration Helvetica 3d (cross within wreath); VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP; mintmark PLN (RIC VII, 171). From the Martock (Somerset) Hoard 2012.

Esuprasu Unit, 40-47
image.png.117f90dfd230a077d407f6c7b5fc335a.png
Corieltauvi tribe. Silver, 14mm, 1.08g. Wreath design, pellet on either side of wreath, crosses in wreath. Horse right with star below tail, (I)ISVP above; (ASV below) (S 406; VA 924.01). Portable Antiquities Scheme: CCI-42661

Saenu Icenian L Unit, AD35-43
image.png.c6500c352df46b0e88055d6ea3313b73.png
Iceni Tribe, East Anglia. Silver, 1.23g. Back-to-back crescents, three lines behind. Stylised horse with linear head right, four-pellet daisy above, six pellets on horse's shoulder; SAENV below (ABC 1699; VA 770-1; S 446).

Edited by John Conduitt
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British Anglo-Saxon. Kings of Mercia. Coenwulf, AD 796-821. AR Penny (20.5mm, 1.28g, 3h). Portrait type. Canterbury mint; Deormod, moneyer. Struck circa AD 810-812. Obv: +COENVVLF REX m; diademed bust right. Rev: +DIORmOD mONETΛ; double pincer-shaped cross superimposed on cross pommée; wedges in angles. Ref: Naismith C39.1q (this coin); SCBI 67 (BM), 132; North 347; SCBC 916. Good Very Fine, even glossy find patina. From the G.W. Trow Collection. Ex Spink Numismatic Circular CXVII.2 (May 2009), no. HS3711. Ex CNG Triton XXIII (15 Jan 2020), Lot 1273.

image.jpeg.97ea98443964c8c63a28ae9be006d8ec.jpeg

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20 hours ago, Edessa said:

British Anglo-Saxon. Kings of Mercia. Coenwulf, AD 796-821. AR Penny (20.5mm, 1.28g, 3h). Portrait type. Canterbury mint; Deormod, moneyer. Struck circa AD 810-812. Obv: +COENVVLF REX m; diademed bust right. Rev: +DIORmOD mONETΛ; double pincer-shaped cross superimposed on cross pommée; wedges in angles. Ref: Naismith C39.1q (this coin); SCBI 67 (BM), 132; North 347; SCBC 916. Good Very Fine, even glossy find patina. From the G.W. Trow Collection. Ex Spink Numismatic Circular CXVII.2 (May 2009), no. HS3711. Ex CNG Triton XXIII (15 Jan 2020), Lot 1273.

image.jpeg.97ea98443964c8c63a28ae9be006d8ec.jpeg

That's a beautiful coin. The portrait is great. Not an easy king to get in such good condition, or even at all.

Allectus Quinarius, 293-296
image.png.7ea868078d7ec64a1ba49a82dfa99a47.pngLondinium. Bronze, 19mm, 2.28g. Bust of Allectus, radiate, cuirassed, right; IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG. Galley with mast, rowing left; VIRTVS AVG; QL in exergue (RIC V.1, 55). Found in Kent in the 1980s.

Magnus Maximus Solidus, 383-388
image.png.b19acda8202a314bb3bdb8d57aae74ad.pngAugusta/London. Gold, 21mm, 4.59g, 6h. Rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Magnus Maximus right, seen from front; D N MAG MA-XIMVS P F AVG. Magnus Maximus and Theodosius I seated facing on double throne, jointly holding globe between them; half-length figure of Victory above facing between, vertical palm branch under throne; VICTOR-IA AVGG; AVGOB in exergue (RIC IX, 2b; Biaggi 2312 (this coin)). Ex Leo Biaggi de Blasys. NGC #6057866-002.

Aethelstan Cut Halfpenny, 933-938
image.png.9d539ce9670913d8b335646c767c59ec.pngLondon. Silver, 20mm, 0.67g. Crowned bust right; + (ÆDELSTAN) REX; AE ligatured; cross-bar on back of D. + LIOFHE(LM MO LOND) CI, small cross (S 1095).

Edited by John Conduitt
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Here is my set of coins of the kingdom of Northumbria, the northern Anglo-Saxon kingdom.

 

8B7A3643-0236-4D44-84E0-A7B46B896BA2.jpeg.3f99b8cd74f1d8cdcd24ca16a1274a13.jpeg

Aldfrith 685-704

 

BD71DDB8-FC09-4AD4-B5CD-FB6152028C93.jpeg.23c3a3d1944979960706550acd9005ce.jpeg

Eadberht 737-758

 

FBAE7F58-BE5D-4DAB-9D84-7346D45E01C5.jpeg.774c71086f3dd55119c9676bf5f5b3a4.jpeg

Aethelwald Moll 759-765

 

2656FF9B-68DB-49D8-A68F-5273A5A3E2FF.jpeg.540ec9369e1595261816b3f41c8a5375.jpeg

Alchred 765-774

 

16854BFF-7608-4D72-A241-BE9C1A5C07C8.jpeg.10d624b39d9d8d61143ed89558a856be.jpeg

Aethelred I (1st reign) 774-779

 

25E144CD-851D-499F-927A-85E4B3C44325.jpeg.8f46a67a8d063a42c42234f35ea730cd.jpeg

Aelfwald I 779-788

 

FC3DE52E-90C8-48B4-99AB-D26BE865D1F7.jpeg.d63572c3a2a038ac2bef9579efe74682.jpeg

Aethelred II (2nd reign) 790-796

 

3B179A22-5277-402D-BD46-8A6A2E9449EA.jpeg.136b5b4b7e90bd469cb3c04d3984b815.jpeg

Eardwulf (1st reign?) 796-806

 

32D0C6C2-8CC6-4FA1-A82D-EDF458746975.jpeg.4d5033fe405cef36ee433c57152c2cf2.jpeg

Aelfwald II (?) 806-808

 

6F6E08F9-6344-4886-8B1A-11EF2C86121A.jpeg.76c85e4e7affd8b2a14289bad80186d4.jpeg

Eanred 810-841

 

8154E2FE-AB82-4D35-AB11-7B5F58CD60FC.jpeg.3e0d3dd31ca5fc7d69cc70f3ce01124e.jpeg

Aethelred II (1st reign) 841-843

 

0D53AD37-97AF-450A-9D01-C1198518F884.jpeg.e897a5b6672cff514ed923a10e15a63e.jpeg

Redwulf 844

 

5B642B72-D285-4630-9E34-D798B30FFA5F.jpeg.c298fe5d3fd5974eb4e3473da64e6771.jpeg

Aethelred II (2nd reign) 844-849

 

F63A735C-1C50-4B3B-9A3C-5789CFE02425.jpeg.c37d2694fb2aabe9da2a4c7be4fc1a51.jpeg

Osberht 849-867

 

There are no known coins for the kings between Aldfrith and Eadberht (Eadwulf, Osred I, Coenred, Osric, or Ceolwulf)

Similarly there are no known coins for some of the short lived monarchs of the turbulent late 8th century- Oswulf, Osred II, or Osbald.  There are no known coins of Osberht’s rival Aella.  And there are no known coins after Osberht, when the Vikings took over and installed puppet leaders.  The reason for the cessation of coinage for 30 years until ~895 in Northumbria is not clear.

There are coins that seem to be naming some otherwise unknown individual, such as Hoaud or Beorn, and some suggesting the name Aella, but these are irregular issues, and almost certainly there was no king Hoaud.

There were 4 coins “found” in a monastery excavation in the 19th century in the name of Ecgfrith (670-685) but these were determined to be forgeries.

Also, coins of Aelfwald II are disputed, they may have been made during the time of Aelfwald I, and the so-called Aelfwald II, who is only mentioned in passing in one source, might not have been a distinct king.

It is not known whether Eardwulf’s coins were made during his first or second reign, but there are only 8 known so it hardly matters!  As his second reign is disputed the coins are generally assigned to the first reign.

The coin of Aethelwald Moll is also a great rarity, one of only 4 known.  For many years this chipped example was the only one known.  A few others were found in the last 30 years.  This particular coin was first published in 1841 with an accompanying hand drawing; the coin was already chipped then so it is easily recognizable.

It is interesting that the Northumbrian series, with its major rarities, also includes the most common coins of Anglo-Saxon times- the stycas of Eanred and Aethelred II.  Thousands of coins of these two monarchs have been found, and continue to be unearthed, including several massive hoards at Hexham, Bolton Percy, and York.

It seems that the Northumbrian coinage production had a great deal of fluctuation in terms of production.  There are several hundred coins known of Aethelred I’s 6-year 2nd reign, by 5 different moneyers, but there are only 8 coins known of Eardwulf’s 10-year reign, all by the same one moneyer.  By the time of Eardwulf’s son Eanred, coin production ramped up a ton and 20 different moneyers worked for him, with thousands of coins known.  Redwulf, only king for less than a year, had 10 different moneyers working for him, and while his coins are scarce they are not that hard to come by.

I am not aware of extant coins naming any other Northumbrian kings besides the ones I have shown.

Edited by Nap
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1 hour ago, Nap said:

Here is my set of coins of the kingdom of Northumbria, the northern Anglo-Saxon kingdom.

 

8B7A3643-0236-4D44-84E0-A7B46B896BA2.jpeg.3f99b8cd74f1d8cdcd24ca16a1274a13.jpeg

Aldfrith 685-704

 

BD71DDB8-FC09-4AD4-B5CD-FB6152028C93.jpeg.23c3a3d1944979960706550acd9005ce.jpeg

Eadberht 737-758

 

FBAE7F58-BE5D-4DAB-9D84-7346D45E01C5.jpeg.774c71086f3dd55119c9676bf5f5b3a4.jpeg

Aethelwald Moll 759-765

 

2656FF9B-68DB-49D8-A68F-5273A5A3E2FF.jpeg.540ec9369e1595261816b3f41c8a5375.jpeg

Alchred 765-774

 

16854BFF-7608-4D72-A241-BE9C1A5C07C8.jpeg.10d624b39d9d8d61143ed89558a856be.jpeg

Aethelred I (1st reign) 774-779

 

25E144CD-851D-499F-927A-85E4B3C44325.jpeg.8f46a67a8d063a42c42234f35ea730cd.jpeg

Aelfwald I 779-788

 

FC3DE52E-90C8-48B4-99AB-D26BE865D1F7.jpeg.d63572c3a2a038ac2bef9579efe74682.jpeg

Aethelred II (2nd reign) 790-796

 

3B179A22-5277-402D-BD46-8A6A2E9449EA.jpeg.136b5b4b7e90bd469cb3c04d3984b815.jpeg

Eardwulf (1st reign?) 796-806

 

32D0C6C2-8CC6-4FA1-A82D-EDF458746975.jpeg.4d5033fe405cef36ee433c57152c2cf2.jpeg

Aelfwald II (?) 806-808

 

6F6E08F9-6344-4886-8B1A-11EF2C86121A.jpeg.76c85e4e7affd8b2a14289bad80186d4.jpeg

Eanred 810-841

 

8154E2FE-AB82-4D35-AB11-7B5F58CD60FC.jpeg.3e0d3dd31ca5fc7d69cc70f3ce01124e.jpeg

Aethelred II (1st reign) 841-843

 

0D53AD37-97AF-450A-9D01-C1198518F884.jpeg.e897a5b6672cff514ed923a10e15a63e.jpeg

Redwulf 844

 

5B642B72-D285-4630-9E34-D798B30FFA5F.jpeg.c298fe5d3fd5974eb4e3473da64e6771.jpeg

Aethelred II (2nd reign) 844-849

 

F63A735C-1C50-4B3B-9A3C-5789CFE02425.jpeg.c37d2694fb2aabe9da2a4c7be4fc1a51.jpeg

Osberht 849-867

 

There are no known coins for the kings between Aldfrith and Eadberht (Eadwulf, Osred I, Coenred, Osric, or Ceolwulf)

Similarly there are no known coins for some of the short lived monarchs of the turbulent late 8th century- Oswulf, Osred II, or Osbald.  There are no known coins of Osberht’s rival Aella.  And there are no known coins after Osberht, when the Vikings took over and installed puppet leaders.  The reason for the cessation of coinage for 30 years until ~895 in Northumbria is not clear.

There are coins that seem to be naming some otherwise unknown individual, such as Hoaud or Beorn, and some suggesting the name Aella, but these are irregular issues, and almost certainly there was no king Hoaud.

There were 4 coins “found” in a monastery excavation in the 19th century in the name of Ecgfrith (670-685) but these were determined to be forgeries.

Also, coins of Aelfwald II are disputed, they may have been made during the time of Aelfwald I, and the so-called Aelfwald II, who is only mentioned in passing in one source, might not have been a distinct king.

It is not known whether Eardwulf’s coins were made during his first or second reign, but there are only 8 known so it hardly matters!  As his second reign is disputed the coins are generally assigned to the first reign.

The coin of Aethelwald Moll is also a great rarity, one of only 4 known.  For many years this chipped example was the only one known.  A few others were found in the last 30 years.  This particular coin was first published in 1841 with an accompanying hand drawing; the coin was already chipped then so it is easily recognizable.

It is interesting that the Northumbrian series, with its major rarities, also includes the most common coins of Anglo-Saxon times- the stycas of Eanred and Aethelred II.  Thousands of coins of these two monarchs have been found, and continue to be unearthed, including several massive hoards at Hexham, Bolton Percy, and York.

It seems that the Northumbrian coinage production had a great deal of fluctuation in terms of production.  There are several hundred coins known of Aethelred I’s 6-year 2nd reign, by 5 different moneyers, but there are only 8 coins known of Eardwulf’s 10-year reign, all by the same one moneyer.  By the time of Eardwulf’s son Eanred, coin production ramped up a ton and 20 different moneyers worked for him, with thousands of coins known.  Redwulf, only king for less than a year, had 10 different moneyers working for him, and while his coins are scarce they are not that hard to come by.

I am not aware of extant coins naming any other Northumbrian kings besides the ones I have shown.

Thank you for posting these wonderful coins of Northumbria, a truly remarkable collection.

We don't have a countermarked coin depicting a British monarch in the CM, so here's one for the thread:

George III,  dollar, 1797-1799, countermarked 8 reales of Charles IV, 1795 FM of Mexico.

S 3765; ESC-129.

147106674_D-CameraGeorgeIIIdollarcountermarked1797-17998realesofCharlesIV1795FMMexico8realesS3765ESC-129WW9-21-22.jpg.ae58ef87273511645b4d4b7cce6ebce3.jpg

 

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On 9/21/2022 at 10:42 PM, Nap said:

Here is my set of coins of the kingdom of Northumbria, the northern Anglo-Saxon kingdom.

 

8B7A3643-0236-4D44-84E0-A7B46B896BA2.jpeg.3f99b8cd74f1d8cdcd24ca16a1274a13.jpeg

Aldfrith 685-704

 

BD71DDB8-FC09-4AD4-B5CD-FB6152028C93.jpeg.23c3a3d1944979960706550acd9005ce.jpeg

Eadberht 737-758

 

FBAE7F58-BE5D-4DAB-9D84-7346D45E01C5.jpeg.774c71086f3dd55119c9676bf5f5b3a4.jpeg

Aethelwald Moll 759-765

 

2656FF9B-68DB-49D8-A68F-5273A5A3E2FF.jpeg.540ec9369e1595261816b3f41c8a5375.jpeg

Alchred 765-774

 

16854BFF-7608-4D72-A241-BE9C1A5C07C8.jpeg.10d624b39d9d8d61143ed89558a856be.jpeg

Aethelred I (1st reign) 774-779

 

25E144CD-851D-499F-927A-85E4B3C44325.jpeg.8f46a67a8d063a42c42234f35ea730cd.jpeg

Aelfwald I 779-788

 

FC3DE52E-90C8-48B4-99AB-D26BE865D1F7.jpeg.d63572c3a2a038ac2bef9579efe74682.jpeg

Aethelred II (2nd reign) 790-796

 

3B179A22-5277-402D-BD46-8A6A2E9449EA.jpeg.136b5b4b7e90bd469cb3c04d3984b815.jpeg

Eardwulf (1st reign?) 796-806

 

32D0C6C2-8CC6-4FA1-A82D-EDF458746975.jpeg.4d5033fe405cef36ee433c57152c2cf2.jpeg

Aelfwald II (?) 806-808

 

6F6E08F9-6344-4886-8B1A-11EF2C86121A.jpeg.76c85e4e7affd8b2a14289bad80186d4.jpeg

Eanred 810-841

 

8154E2FE-AB82-4D35-AB11-7B5F58CD60FC.jpeg.3e0d3dd31ca5fc7d69cc70f3ce01124e.jpeg

Aethelred II (1st reign) 841-843

 

0D53AD37-97AF-450A-9D01-C1198518F884.jpeg.e897a5b6672cff514ed923a10e15a63e.jpeg

Redwulf 844

 

5B642B72-D285-4630-9E34-D798B30FFA5F.jpeg.c298fe5d3fd5974eb4e3473da64e6771.jpeg

Aethelred II (2nd reign) 844-849

 

F63A735C-1C50-4B3B-9A3C-5789CFE02425.jpeg.c37d2694fb2aabe9da2a4c7be4fc1a51.jpeg

Osberht 849-867

 

There are no known coins for the kings between Aldfrith and Eadberht (Eadwulf, Osred I, Coenred, Osric, or Ceolwulf)

Similarly there are no known coins for some of the short lived monarchs of the turbulent late 8th century- Oswulf, Osred II, or Osbald.  There are no known coins of Osberht’s rival Aella.  And there are no known coins after Osberht, when the Vikings took over and installed puppet leaders.  The reason for the cessation of coinage for 30 years until ~895 in Northumbria is not clear.

There are coins that seem to be naming some otherwise unknown individual, such as Hoaud or Beorn, and some suggesting the name Aella, but these are irregular issues, and almost certainly there was no king Hoaud.

There were 4 coins “found” in a monastery excavation in the 19th century in the name of Ecgfrith (670-685) but these were determined to be forgeries.

Also, coins of Aelfwald II are disputed, they may have been made during the time of Aelfwald I, and the so-called Aelfwald II, who is only mentioned in passing in one source, might not have been a distinct king.

It is not known whether Eardwulf’s coins were made during his first or second reign, but there are only 8 known so it hardly matters!  As his second reign is disputed the coins are generally assigned to the first reign.

The coin of Aethelwald Moll is also a great rarity, one of only 4 known.  For many years this chipped example was the only one known.  A few others were found in the last 30 years.  This particular coin was first published in 1841 with an accompanying hand drawing; the coin was already chipped then so it is easily recognizable.

It is interesting that the Northumbrian series, with its major rarities, also includes the most common coins of Anglo-Saxon times- the stycas of Eanred and Aethelred II.  Thousands of coins of these two monarchs have been found, and continue to be unearthed, including several massive hoards at Hexham, Bolton Percy, and York.

It seems that the Northumbrian coinage production had a great deal of fluctuation in terms of production.  There are several hundred coins known of Aethelred I’s 6-year 2nd reign, by 5 different moneyers, but there are only 8 coins known of Eardwulf’s 10-year reign, all by the same one moneyer.  By the time of Eardwulf’s son Eanred, coin production ramped up a ton and 20 different moneyers worked for him, with thousands of coins known.  Redwulf, only king for less than a year, had 10 different moneyers working for him, and while his coins are scarce they are not that hard to come by.

I am not aware of extant coins naming any other Northumbrian kings besides the ones I have shown.

It's so good to see a set like that. Obviously, there can only be four!

We're definitely getting down to the speculative monarchs - either their coins are disputed, or the monarch is. The Saxons get particularly messy with irregular issues, archbishops and moneyers named on the coins. I'll take Hourd off the list as although someone could post a 'Hourd' coin, he probably isn't a monarch anyway.

The Celts have a number of similarly desputed monarchs too, since most are only known by their coins anyway.

Saxon Series A is possibly attributed to a king I didn't even have on the list - Hlothere of Kent - although it's anonymous.

Series A Sceatta, 680-710

image.png.6a77a584bd479d4d4fb302c83c2a5266.png
East Kent. Silver, 12mm, 0.88g. Radiate bust with curved exergual drapery; TIIC in front, A and annulets behind. Degenerate votive standard with seriffed letters TOTII, tufa above containing trefoil of pellets, rounded horns, seriffed letters in margin, cross below (S 775; BMC Type 2a).

Edited by John Conduitt
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9 hours ago, Nap said:

Here are the speculative coins of “Hoaud” and “Beorn”

 

4A14EF67-CDA1-4698-ABD9-DAAC47A7F6BE.jpeg.8f49d880b347529bd5510592ba01578c.jpeg

”HOAVD RE”

 

FC58FD81-9D29-442E-A39F-CB4E1EE5FD20.jpeg.99975cd6e5858a7e4ed6db33b241b641.jpeg

”BEOM RE”

Of course, you have these too. You must have a more complete collection than the whole of Northumberland 😂 I can’t imagine the years of patient searching.

The irregular issues are perplexing. Moneyers who seemed to be able to spell, if sometimes get the letters the wrong way around, suddenly took to using whatever letters they liked - but often still spelling something. Hoaud and Beorn aren’t incoherent.

Presumably, they’re emergency issues and someone said to local metalworkers, look, there’s a civil war on, we need you to copy these coins, don’t worry about what they say. But why start them off with Hoaud and Beorn? Perhaps those were the professional moneyers’ names, but as far as I know, they don’t appear on official coinage. Or maybe they started off as Aethelred or whatever, and someone in the chain of copying the copies blundered it into those.

Edited by John Conduitt
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11 hours ago, robinjojo said:

Thank you for posting these wonderful coins of Northumbria, a truly remarkable collection.

We don't have a countermarked coin depicting a British monarch in the CM, so here's one for the thread:

George III,  dollar, 1797-1799, countermarked 8 reales of Charles IV, 1795 FM of Mexico.

S 3765; ESC-129.

147106674_D-CameraGeorgeIIIdollarcountermarked1797-17998realesofCharlesIV1795FMMexico8realesS3765ESC-129WW9-21-22.jpg.ae58ef87273511645b4d4b7cce6ebce3.jpg

 

Nice example. I think I’m right in saying these were all 1797 or 1804, with the 1797 version worth 4 shillings and 9 pence and the 1804 worth 5 shillings.

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I'll increase the Celtic representation.

Vepocunavos ‘Corielatuvian M’ Unit, 15-40
image.png.607f42b0a2663f06fdfa48c5a1f5f596.pngCorieltauvi tribe, English Midlands. Silver, 13x14mm, 1.05g. Horse with VEPOC above. Uniface (S 412; ABC 1869; VA 955). Found York.


Antedios ‘D-Bar’ Unit, 10-30
image.png.0cc52c57beca874b5f968eb05c1a8c0c.pngIceni tribe, East Anglia. Silver, 13x14mm, 1.01g. Horse right, corn-ear mane, pellet daisy above, pellet under tail, pellet triad and ANTĐ monogram below. Double moon emblem on vertical wreath (ABC 1645).

 

Epatticus Unit, 35-43
image.png.a908ca0ba942786ef78171442cb48c34.pngAtrebates Kingdom. Silver, 13mm, 1.19g. Victory seated right, TAS-CIO-V around. Boar right, tree behind, EPAT below (ABC 1349; S 357). Obverse copied from a denarius of M Volteius. Reverse copied from a denarius of M Porcius Cato or M Porcius Cato Uticensis.


Verica Minim, AD10-40
image.png.adc745a1433ef0921965b19a9067d0c2.pngSilchester or Chichester, Atrebates tribe. Silver, 7mm, 0.35g. Wine cup; REX above. Eagle right; VERICA COMMI F around (S 159).

Sam ‘Boar Branch’ Unit, 1-10

image.png.99b9e11b86c16e3a77251d0ca6da6e56.png
Cantii Kingdom. Bronze, 14mm, 2.22g. Boar left, branch above, ringed pellet below. Horse left, (SA) below (ABC 375; S 187a). Found north Kent 2001 (Celtic Coin Index 03.09U9). Sam was a king of the Cantiaci whose reign may have overlapped that of Dubnovellaunos.


Tasciovanus 3rd Coinage ‘Trinovantian O’ Unit, 5BC-AD5
image.png.0928ab25d1970189b691cacb047c6176.png
Verlamion. Silver, 13mm, 1.40g. Quadrilobe inscribed with saltire, superimposed on stylized cross. V-E-R-L in angles. Boar right; TAS above, star below (ABC 2628).

Edited by John Conduitt
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Scotland. William I 'the Lion'. AD 1165-1214. AR Penny (19mm, 1.45g, 1h). Third (Short Cross & Stars) coinage, phase B. Edinburgh or Perth mint; Hue and Walter, moneyers. Struck circa AD 1205-1230. Obv: Crowned head left; scepter to left. Rev: + ҺVЄ WALTЄO; Voided short cross; stars of six points in quarters. Ref: SCBC 5029.

image.jpeg.2047c892cf742fa83e33d0f7aa4cbae6.jpeg

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21 hours ago, Edessa said:

Scotland. William I 'the Lion'. AD 1165-1214. AR Penny (19mm, 1.45g, 1h). Third (Short Cross & Stars) coinage, phase B. Edinburgh or Perth mint; Hue and Walter, moneyers. Struck circa AD 1205-1230. Obv: Crowned head left; scepter to left. Rev: + ҺVЄ WALTЄO; Voided short cross; stars of six points in quarters. Ref: SCBC 5029.

image.jpeg.2047c892cf742fa83e33d0f7aa4cbae6.jpeg

Great coin. You don't see many of these around.

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I can post my Henry VI Restored groat here...

Henry VI Second Reign (Restored) Groat, 1470-1471
image.png.405c7a915d594470bdabdc00ce8f3950.png
Tower. Silver, 26mm, 2.72g. Crowned facing bust in tressure of arches, trefoils on cusps above crown, saltire stops; hЄnRICV DI GRΛ RЄX ΛnGL Z FRAnC (Henry by the Grace of God King of England and France). Long cross pattee, trefoils in quarters, saltire stops; + POSVI DЄVm ΛDIVTORЄ mЄV (I have made God my helper); CIVI TAS LOn Don (City of London); mintmark pierced restoration cross both sides (S 2082, this coin). Ex Ivan Buck.

Yet to be posted:

Scotland (7): Mary I of Scots, Robert III, Robert II, Robert I, John Balliol, Alexander II, Malcolm IV

England post-Alfred (9): Mary (sole reign), Harold II, Harold I, (Edmund II Ironside/Aethered II 2nd Reign), Cnut, Edgar, Eadred, (Æthelflæd), Edward the Elder

Viking (15): (Sweyn Forkbeard), Eric Bloodaxe, Ragnall II Guthfrithson, Amlaíb Cuarán/Anlaf Sithtricsson/Olaf Sihtricson, Olaf Guthfrithson, Sihtric II Caech, Ragnall ua Ímair, Æthelwold, Cnut of Northumbria, Siefred/Cnut/Sievert, Guthred, Guthrum, Halfdan I, Æthelred II of East Anglia, Oswald


Saxons pre-Alfred (15): Aethelred I of Wessex, Aethelbert III, Edmund of East Anglia, Æthelweard, Brihtwulf, Wiglaf, Ludeca, Beornwulf, Ceolwulf I, Egbert, Beorhtric, Eadberht III Præn, Beonna, 'Aethelred of Mercia', Eadbald

Northumbria: all posted.

Londinium: all posted.

Celts (48): Cassivellaunos, Exobnos, Commios, Commios (son of Commios), Addedomaros, Dubnovellaunos, Boduoc, Tincomarus, Corio, Andoco, Var, Eppillus, Cor, Anarevitos, Vosenos, Dias, Rues, Inam, Comux, Sego, Touto, Trocc, Catti, Sia, Caniduro, Cat 1, Attas, Crab, Aunt Cost, Catuscunavos, Vellaracun, Anted (Dobunni), Eisu, Aesu, Ecen, Volisios, Dumnovellaunos, Tigirseno, Dumnocoveros, Latison, (Ale) Scavo, Amminus, Agr(icu), Togodumnus, Solidus, Cartivellaunos, Esuprasto/Prasutagus, Caratacus 
 

Edited by John Conduitt
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