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WORLD COINS free-for-all - anything and everything, post 'em up!


CPK
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15 minutes ago, CPK said:

Do you know what date they are from? 

Most of them date from the end of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th. So not so old.

 

This one is dated 1924:

c1103g.jpg.ea0979c7cdf3fb8212f64c3afcdfb4db.jpg

Bamboo tally
Av: 甲子, Jia zi (wood rat, the first year of the 60 year cycle, 1924).
足制钱壹伯文, zo zhi qian yi bai wen (money system 100 wen).
泰, tai ?
Rv: 香山西, xiang shan xi (fragrant west mountain).
Material: bamboo
Year: 1924

Edited by shanxi
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22 hours ago, Marsyas Mike said:

Here's the overstrike - as you can see, it didn't work out so well:

2036715775_FranceOverstrikeAug2018(0aa).jpg.ef53d6bc831c2ee9f8fdfb90a4827e84.jpg

France  L’An 5 (1796-1797) First Republic, Directory 1 Décime over 2 Décimes  Paris Mint / Limoges Mint Overstruck on 2 decime,

More than an overstricke (which it undoubtetly is) the coin has been transformed to be a game puck. See here

Q

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Here is a new favorite!

1745_lima_V3.jpg.4f8ffe3adaad722110429fde7725f7fc.jpg

I love the special history behind this coin - treasure ships, daring seamanship, desperate battles, set in the far-flung New World coasts of South America - what could be more captivating? It isn't often one can tie a coin to a single historical event so directly!

Here is a painting of this very battle, done in oil by Samuel Scott in the mid-1700's, shortly after the event itself:

14400.jpg.0d682066c31b27b4ac84a8da3bbf8378.jpg

 

Anyone else have any LIMA coins?

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10 hours ago, CPK said:

Here is a new favorite!

1745_lima_V3.jpg.4f8ffe3adaad722110429fde7725f7fc.jpg

I love the special history behind this coin - treasure ships, daring seamanship, desperate battles, set in the far-flung New World coasts of South America - what could be more captivating? It isn't often one can tie a coin to a single historical event so directly!

Here is a painting of this very battle, done in oil by Samuel Scott in the mid-1700's, shortly after the event itself:

14400.jpg.0d682066c31b27b4ac84a8da3bbf8378.jpg

 

Anyone else have any LIMA coins?

I have a low grade that I found in a 50 cent junk box in the 80s. I'll have to dig it out.  I remember doing a little research and found the story interesting. It's one of my favorite junk box finds.

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I recently acquired some coins of the Dutch East India Company. The Age of Discovery and the opening of trade routes between Europe and the Far East led to the development of some truly gigantic "private" companies, which were so powerful that they not only minted their own coins but actually maintained their own standing armies, able to conduct war and diplomacy.

Of these companies, the United East India Company - also known as the Dutch East India Company - was the largest, and one of the first. Here are a few paragraphs of history taken from the DEIC Wikipedia page:

"The Dutch East India Company (Dutch: Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie, VOC, "United East India Company") was a chartered company established in 1602 when the States General of the Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out trade activities in Asia. It is sometimes considered to have been the first multinational corporation in the world,[2] and it was the first company to issue stock.[3] It was a powerful company, possessing quasi-governmental powers, including the ability to wage war, imprison and execute convicts,[4] negotiate treaties, strike its own coins, and establish colonies.[5]

"Statistically, the VOC eclipsed all of its rivals in the Asia trade. Between 1602 and 1796 the VOC sent almost a million Europeans to work in the Asia trade on 4,785 ships, and netted for their efforts more than 2.5 million tons of Asian trade goods. By contrast, the rest of Europe combined sent only 882,412 people from 1500 to 1795, and the fleet of the English (later British) East India Company, the VOC's nearest competitor, was a distant second to its total traffic with 2,690 ships and a mere one-fifth the tonnage of goods carried by the VOC. The VOC enjoyed huge profits from its spice monopoly through most of the 17th century.[6]

"Having been set up in 1602 to profit from the Malukan spice trade, the VOC established a capital in the port city of Jayakarta in 1609 and changed the city name into Batavia (now Jakarta). Over the next two centuries the company acquired additional ports as trading bases and safeguarded their interests by taking over surrounding territory.[7] It remained an important trading concern and paid an 18% annual dividend for almost 200 years.

"Weighed down by smuggling, corruption and growing administrative costs in the late 18th century, the company went bankrupt and was formally dissolved in 1799. Its possessions and debt were taken over by the government of the Dutch Batavian Republic. The former territories owned by the VOC went on to become the Dutch East Indies and were expanded over the course of the 19th century to include the entirety of the Indonesian archipelago. In the 20th century, these islands would form the Republic of Indonesia."

(18% annually over 200 years would turn a $1 investment into almost $238 trillion!)

Though the DEIC reached its height in the late 17th century, at the time of these coin's minting it was still a mighty economic force in the East.

 

1736_DEIC.jpg.cbeb07566363833215c690e3ef3466b3.jpg

 

DEIC_1742.jpg.4d8f25cff3fe868b806ad1a6481fb2ec.jpg

 

I have a couple more DEIC coins coming, so I hope to post some more soon!

 

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Here's an oddity - the only Irish coin since the time of Henry VIII not to feature a harp.   Instead, the obverse features a profile bust of Patrick Pearse, leader of the 1916 rebellion commemorated by the coin.   The reverse has a statue of Cúchulainn tied to a standing stone to face his enemies, who only approach him when a raven lands on his shoulder and they know he's dead.

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/modern-ireland-in-100-artworks-1935-the-death-of-cuchulainn-by-oliver-sheppard-1.2154483

The 1966 10 shilling coin was issued both for circulation and as a proof - it was the only 10s coin issued in Ireland, where the largest denomination was the halfcrown (2s6d) and the first silver coin minted since 1943.   It wasn't popular and the majority of the 2 million minted were melted down.   Interestingly, they weren't demonetised until the introduction of Euro coins and notes in 2002, probably because nobody remembered that they were still officially legal tender.   After decimalisation in 1971, the 50p coin replaced the 10 shilling note and this coin.

Here's an uncirculated example and a proof example.   The proofs didn't come in capsules, but were exposed to the elements and so can become a bit grotty, like this example.   I could probably manage a better photo', though.   The uncirculated example came straight from a roll when I got it.

Weight: 18.144g   Diameter: 30.5mm   Alignment: 0h   Mintage: 2,000,000 + 10,000 proofs

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ATB,
Aidan.

Edited by akeady
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I've already posted that previously, but thought it might be appropriate to have it here too :

The siege of Mainz (source Wikipedia)

"In the siege of Mainz (German: Belagerung von Mainz), from 14 April to 23 July 1793, a coalition of Prussia, Austria, and other German states led by the Holy Roman Empire besieged and captured Mainz from revolutionary French forces. The allies, especially the Prussians, first tried negotiations, but this failed, and the bombardment of the city began on the night of 17 June.

Within the town the siege and bombardment led to stress between citizens, municipality and the French war council, governing since 2 April. The city administration was displaced on 13 July; this increased the stubbornness of the remaining population. Since a relief army was missing, the war council was forced to take up negotiations with the allied forces on 17 July; the remaining soldiers capitulated on 23 July.

Nearly 19,000 French troops surrendered at the end of the siege, but were allowed to return to France if they promised not to fight against the allies for one year. Consequently, they were used to fight French royalists in the Vendée region of France. They left the town singing La Marseillaise (also known as the Chant de guerre de l'Armée du Rhin).

The Republic of Mainz, the first democratic state on the later German territory, was subsequently dissolved. Mainz received a Prussian commander to administer the city. The bombardment had left devastating traces in the townscape: some civil buildings and aristocratic palaces like the comedy house, the electoral pleasure palace Favorite, the House of the Cathedral Provost, Liebfrauen- and the church of Society of Jesus had been destroyed, as well as St. Crucis, the Benedictine abbey St. Jacob on the citadel and the remains of St. Alban's Abbey. The cathedral had been heavily damaged.

The biggest impact of the occupation and siege was that the city's part in the old imperial electoral structure finally came to their end. Thus the events of the year 1793 also marked the end of Aurea Moguntia, the Latin nickname for the city: "Golden Mainz". The city lost its status as the electoral residence.

The shelling of Mainz was widely discussed in Europe. Many people gathered round the town in order to view the siege. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe assisted Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar during the siege and wrote a famous book about it."

During the siege, the population there had to mint in emergency for everyday use. Three denominations are known to exist, 1 sol, 2 sols and 5 sols. They're uncommon rather than rare

 

Gad66-1793-s.jpg.ea88a54047d117b5bc7ead1f798a406c.jpg

Siège de Mayence - 2 sols 1793 - Atelier de Mayence (Mainz) 

REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE / 1793 L'AN 2ᴱ Faisceau de licteur surmonté d'un bonnet phrygien, dans une couronne de chêne (variété à trois branches)
MONOYE DE SIEGE DE MAYENCE - au centre 2 SOLS en deux lignes entre trois roses
9,19 gr - 25 mm
Ref : Gadoury # 66

 

Gad66a-1793-s.jpg.6d3f66ba62acbbd7a8b1d49738ed6b53.jpg

Siège de Mayence - 2 sols 1793 - Atelier de Mayence (Mainz) 

REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE / 1793 L'AN 2ᴱ Faisceau de licteur surmonté d'un bonnet phrygien, dans une couronne de chêne (variété à rameaux simples)
MONOYE DE SIEGE DE MAYENCE - au centre 2 SOLS en deux lignes entre trois roses
7,07 gr - 23 mm
Ref : Gadoury # 66a

 

Gad67-1793-s.jpg.f54ddd21b01ae756311b59f470a3b4ec.jpg

Siège de Mayence - 5 sols 1793 - Atelier de Mayence (Mainz) 

REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE / 1793 L'AN 2ᴱ Faisceau de licteur surmonté d'un bonnet phrygien, dans une couronne de chêne
MONOYE DE SIEGE DE MAYENCE - au centre 5 SOLS en deux lignes entre trois roses
14,71 gr - 31 mm
Ref : Gadoury # 67

Q
 

Edited by Qcumbor
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This official coin was issued in Mandschukuo. The material is some kind of plastic material. 

 

1941239623_c536g(1).jpg.413c2071e7065b23faf2380cf0ac6740.jpg

Manchukuo
"Ruler": 康德, Kang De
Year: 12 (1945)
Av:
top: 滿洲帝國, mǎn zhōu dì guó (Manchu Empire).
center: 5, two dots
below: 康德十二年, kāng dé shí èr nián (Kang De, year 12)
Rv: 五分, wǔ fēn 5 (Fen), wreath pattern.
Value: 5 Fen
Material: fiber/plastic, 19.35mm, 0.94g
Literature: KM Y#A13a

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3 hours ago, shanxi said:

This official coin was issued in Mandschukuo. The material is some kind of plastic material. 

 

1941239623_c536g(1).jpg.413c2071e7065b23faf2380cf0ac6740.jpg

Manchukuo
"Ruler": 康德, Kang De
Year: 12 (1945)
Av:
top: 滿洲帝國, mǎn zhōu dì guó (Manchu Empire).
center: 5, two dots
below: 康德十二年, kāng dé shí èr nián (Kang De, year 12)
Rv: 五分, wǔ fēn 5 (Fen), wreath pattern.
Value: 5 Fen
Material: fiber/plastic, 19.35mm, 0.94g
Literature: KM Y#A13a

It is compressed fibre (Rubber and Magnesite)

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces22470.html

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